Naked Science Forum

Life Sciences => Physiology & Medicine => Topic started by: vhfpmr on 02/02/2017 16:11:04

Title: Does the Brain Habituate to Antidepressants?
Post by: vhfpmr on 02/02/2017 16:11:04
I see people complain that they stop working after they've been on them for a while and think well, yes, why wouldn't they. The brain has evolved to habituate to its environment after all, why should antidepressants be any different to other things it habituates to?
Title: Re: Does the Brain Habituate to Antidepressants?
Post by: RD on 02/02/2017 17:12:51
"Antidepressant discontinuation syndrome (https://wikipedia.org/wiki/Antidepressant_discontinuation_syndrome)" is a euphemism for drug withdrawal (https://wikipedia.org/wiki/Drug_withdrawal) , which means adaptation has occurred.
Title: Re: Does the Brain Habituate to Antidepressants?
Post by: vhfpmr on 11/02/2017 14:14:10
"Antidepressant discontinuation syndrome (https://wikipedia.org/wiki/Antidepressant_discontinuation_syndrome)" is a euphemism for drug withdrawal (https://wikipedia.org/wiki/Drug_withdrawal) , which means adaptation has occurred.
Yes, I suppose when you put it in terms of withdrawal it's obvious, but I was thinking more in terms of the intended therapeutic effects.
Title: Re: Does the Brain Habituate to Antidepressants?
Post by: cheryl j on 21/02/2017 18:51:30
I've always wondered that as well, whether increasing the amount of a neurotransmitter might cause the number or receptors to decrease, or something along those lines. I've never been able to to find a definitive answer to whether the brain builds a kind of tolerance. Some people claim they stop working after a while, but perhaps it is just fluctuations because of situational ups and downs (they won't after all, prevent you from experiencing any grief or disappointment.) 

There is this article about it though: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antidepressant_treatment_tachyphylaxis