Naked Science Forum

On the Lighter Side => New Theories => Topic started by: Malick GM on 05/10/2017 07:15:09

Title: Could this describe covalent bonds?
Post by: Malick GM on 05/10/2017 07:15:09
Sir i also have a theory and as we have heard bonded electrons make their own small orbit in which they start rotating
like in this image attached
But i don't think so i have another theory that the Bonded Electrons Revolve in both Atom's orbits but in a 8-Fashioned Motion Style!!!
Title: Re: Could this describe covalent bonds?
Post by: evan_au on 05/10/2017 18:44:18
This is the section of the forum for New Theories.

Please describe what VB, MO and MCAS mean.
Title: Re: Could this describe covalent bonds?
Post by: Kryptid on 05/10/2017 21:35:45
The electrons in a hydrogen atom's ground state only occupy the 1s orbital, which is known to be spherical in shape. When two hydrogen atoms bond, the two 1s orbitals overlap to produce a sigma bonding and sigma antibonding orbital. In the ground state, only the bonding orbital is occupied (with two electrons). The shape of the sigma bonding orbital is a prolate ellipsoid.

Orbitals are a bit more complicated for larger molecules, but the bonding in diborane does somewhat resemble your provided image.
Title: Re: Could this describe covalent bonds?
Post by: jeffreyH on 06/10/2017 12:33:30
It is useful to actually know how the orbitals are determined.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_orbital
If you don't understand quantum mechanics then it's time to study before you state a 'new theory'.
Title: Re: Could this describe covalent bonds?
Post by: jeffreyH on 06/10/2017 12:36:27
This is the sort of thing.
https://quantummechanics.ucsd.edu/ph130a/130_notes/node129.html
Title: Re: Could this describe covalent bonds?
Post by: puppypower on 09/10/2017 11:40:37
One basic observation about covalent bonds is connected to the electromagnetic force; EM force. The EM force is a mini unified force composed of electrostatic and magnetic aspects. Covalent bonds shift the EM force toward the magnetic side of the EM force.

Covalent bonds use shared electrons, which should increase the electrostatic repulsion for one or both of the atoms. However, because of the opposite spin and opposite movement; a charge in motion gives off a magnetic field, the magnetic fields become more attractive and more than overcome the electrostatic repulsion. The magnetic side of the EM forces becomes dominant.

This criteria of covalent bonds shifting the EM force toward magnetic does not allow all atoms to form covalent bonds, but limits covalent bonds to only certain atoms. For example, atoms that form ions; metal halides and metal oxides, will  shift the EM force to the electrostatic aspect of the EM force.

When ions are dissolved in water, the magnetic aspect of the EM force, of waters covalent bonds, is able to influence the electrostatic aspect of the salt, until a hybrid EM force forms in water at the salt-water interface. This can be different for different ions.

In the case of sodium and potassium cations, sodium ions promotes covalent bonding; kosmotropic, at the level of hydrogen bonding; magnetic, while potassium ions promotes electrostatic bonding; chaotropic, at the level of hydrogen bonding. The cell's membrane segregates these two EM affects, to maintain an EM field gradient which is a critical part of life.





This means that not all atoms can form covalent bonds since the magnetic aspects is not always optimized under the conditions of covalent electron sharing.