Naked Science Forum

General Science => General Science => Topic started by: Tomassci on 01/06/2018 07:11:44

Title: The sounds of science...
Post by: Tomassci on 01/06/2018 07:11:44
Post here any science sounds.
These could be direct sound recordings, could be data sonification.

Please describe what is the sound you are posting, and please cite the source (url of source can apply).

Here is mine:

Source:https://astrosom.com/index.php (https://astrosom.com/index.php)

What you are hearing there is the redshift and blueshift of gases in Milky way. Each type is represented by some instrument. The pitch is controlled by redshift and blueshift and longevity of instrument controlled by amount of gas.
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: Marika on 01/06/2018 10:42:15

What you hear in this video is:
"Juno Captures the 'Roar' of Jupiter: NASA's Juno spacecraft has crossed the boundary of Jupiter's immense magnetic field. Juno's Waves instrument recorded the encounter with the bow shock over the course of about two hours on June 24, 2016.

Plasma Waves: Plasma waves, like the roaring ocean surf, create a rhythmic cacophony that — with the EMFISIS instrument aboard NASA’s Van Allen Probes — we can hear across space.

Saturn's Radio Emissions: Saturn is a source of intense radio emissions, which were monitored by the Cassini spacecraft. The radio waves are closely related to the auroras near the poles of the planet. These auroras are similar to Earth's northern and southern lights. More of Saturn's eerie-sounding radio emissions.

Sounds of Jupiter: Scientists sometimes translate radio signals into sound to better understand the signals. This approach is called "data sonification". On June 27, 1996, the Galileo spacecraft made the first flyby of Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede, and this audio track represents data from Galileo's Plasma Wave Experiment instrument.

Sounds of a Comet Encounter: During its Feb. 14, 2011, flyby of comet Tempel 1, an instrument on the protective shield on NASA's Stardust spacecraft was pelted by dust particles and small rocks, as can be heard in this audio track."

Source:  https://soundcloud.com/nasa/plasmaspheric-hiss  (https://soundcloud.com/nasa/plasmaspheric-hiss)
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: Tomassci on 01/06/2018 11:30:28
Source: https://datadrivendj.com/tracks/brain/ (https://datadrivendj.com/tracks/brain/)
This is representation of seizure.
As Brian says it:
However, as a brief overview, these are the primary brain wave properties I am looking at in the EEG readings and how they affect the music your hear:
Amplitude: is essentially how "tall" the waves are. In the song, when brain wave amplitude increases, more singers are added and the instruments become louder.
Frequency: is how many waves are observed over a given time. When the brain wave frequency increases, the string instruments raise their pitch.
Synchrony: is the simultaneous appearance of rhythmic or distinct wave patterns over different regions of the head over a given time. When the amplitudes and frequencies are synchronous across the whole brain, percussion instruments are introduced.

And that pieces like CZ?
They are this:
(https://datadrivendj.com/assets/img/brain/electrodes.png)
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: RD on 01/06/2018 12:46:15
Cellular automata (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellular_automaton) ... https://youtu.be/k8EfRXihiWg?t=1m50s (https://youtu.be/k8EfRXihiWg?t=1m50s)

Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: RD on 01/06/2018 13:06:30
"Hearing" a nuclear test, earthquake and meteor explosion ...


NB: It's infrasound (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infrasound) pitch-shifted so it's audible.
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: chris on 02/06/2018 10:33:25
Great idea for a thread - well done for starting it!
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: Bored chemist on 02/06/2018 10:39:45
I thought this idea was amusing when I first heard of it as a student.
http://www.chemie.uni-erlangen.de/bauer/music.html

Back then the lecturer played a couple of bits of audio- one was for a simple molecule- I think it may have been alcohol- which sounded tuneful and the corresponding sound for cholesterol which sounded like someone kicking a tin can.
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: Tomassci on 23/06/2018 09:35:01
I am back with another scimusic.
Climate symphony.
https://soundcloud.com/disobedientfilms/climate-symphony-new-piano-and-strings (https://soundcloud.com/disobedientfilms/climate-symphony-new-piano-and-string)
This is representation of climate change. There is hearing of temperatures,1f97ded0269589e6de9986986596b429.gif levels, natural disasters, and more. Sadly, I couldn't find any info on which is which.
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: linsasa on 02/10/2018 05:16:39
Thanks for sharing
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: Colin2B on 02/10/2018 08:52:12
Thanks for sharing
Well, thank you for trying to spam us. Have a complimentary ban on us.

By the way, your website link has been changed to ours.
Bye, bye
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: Bill S on 01/12/2018 13:49:28
David L Chandler (State of the Universe.  New Scientist Supplement. 09.10.2004) repored on the work of Mark Whittle of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville.  He says: “The Universe began not with a bang but with a low moan, building into a roar that gave way to a deafening hiss.”  Whittle, had reconstructed the pattern of the sound waves that would have accompanied the birth of the Universe.  He did this by studying the high resolution mapping of the cosmic microwave background radiation.  Chandler says: “Translating the observed frequency spectrum directly to sound yields tones far too low for ears to hear – some 50 octaves below middle A – but transpose the score up all those octaves and you can listen to it.

Whittle has also used the best available cosmological models to map the way the vibrations evolved over time, showing how the chords of the big bang changed over the Universe’s first million years or so.”   He says: “For perhaps its first million years, the Universe was small and dense enough that sound waves could indeed travel through it – so efficiently, in fact that they moved at about half the speed of light.”  “Contrary to its name, the big bang began in absolute silence.  But the sound soon built up into a roar whose broad-peaked notes corresponded, in musical terms, to a ‘majestic’ major third chord, evolving slowly into a ‘sadder’ minor third”. 

I don’t have a recording of this, but If you still have an analogue radio, tune it along the short wave frequency.  Some of the hiss you will hear between the stations is the sound accompanying the CMB, the remnant of the Big Bang.
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: alancalverd on 17/12/2018 17:03:19
I'm trying to find a recording of "whistlers" - audiofrequency electromagnetic waves resulting from lightning disturbances travelling along the earth's magnetic lines of force. Wikipedia has a nice spectrogram but I can't locate an audio clip. Can anyone help?
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: Bored chemist on 17/12/2018 17:26:10


http://www.astrosurf.com/luxorion/audiofiles-geomagnetosphere.htm
http://www.astrosurf.com/luxorion/audiofiles-geomagnetosphere.htm
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: Colin2B on 17/12/2018 17:58:28
I'm trying to find a recording of "whistlers"
http://www.spaceweather.com/glossary/inspire.html
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: alancalverd on 17/12/2018 18:03:04
Wonderful, thanks BC! Brought back memories of 1964, sitting in a lecture theatre at the Cavendish Lab!

Colin: I haven't got the NASA recordings to open yet, but will keep trying.
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: Loisguerra on 22/12/2018 06:15:15
Hey, Thanks for the  information.
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: bioarray on 18/01/2019 07:51:36
Recently, I am studying medical biochemical products and believe that with biotechnology, we can have a much healthier body and a better quality life. This is the subjevtI have been researching recently:Fibroblast Cells And Media
Fibroblast is a type of cell that synthesizes extracellular matrix and collagen, which form the basic framework structure of biological connective tissue in animals and play an important role in tissue repair. As well as being present as fibroblasts, these cells exist in an alternative state, as fibrocytes. Fibroblast is the term used to describe these cells when they are in an activated state. Fibrocyte refers to a state in which cells are less active. The morphology of fibroblasts depends on their function and site of action. Fibroblasts extracted from a particular location can "remember" their original location and function when transplanted to another location in the body.
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: Colin2B on 19/01/2019 12:21:25
Recently, I am studying medical biochemical products ................
Please phrase your title as a question and ask a science question in the main text. If you don’t do this in the next 24hrs your post will be removed.
Also, what relevance does it have to this section??
Title: The sounds of science
Post by: bennieAligh on 26/04/2019 12:22:52
Trust network, much like the theory in PGP.

Give weight levels of truth to bits of information. That allows a truth factor to be computed.
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: ruhhana on 05/07/2019 09:50:27
The Sounds of Science pretty much ignores the more politically incorrect side of the Beasties’ early material: There’s no sign of the pillaging brats who rode on “Paul Revere.” Instead, there’s a new single, “Alive,” which brims with straight-edge earnestness: “Don’t smoke cheeba/Can’t stand crack.” The song also acknowledges the Beasties’ unlikely new role as keepers of the hip-hop flame by sampling one of Boogie Down Productions’ mottoes: “Bringin’ back that old New York rap.” On recent albums, the Beasties have done that as well as any three MCs of the Nineties. But The Sounds of Science doesn’t convincingly make the case.
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: RidaChat on 12/07/2019 02:43:25
The sounds of Rhapsody in Grey is very relaxing. I loved listening to it.
Title: Re: The sounds of science...
Post by: thompsonmax on 12/05/2020 08:55:30
For me any classic music is sound of science