Naked Science Forum

Non Life Sciences => Physics, Astronomy & Cosmology => Topic started by: bobdihi on 13/01/2019 22:25:02

Title: When Vacuum Is Not A Vacuum?
Post by: bobdihi on 13/01/2019 22:25:02
As defined Vacuum is a space entirely devoid of matter. Does it mean when I create a vacuum in a glass bowl for example and then I drop in the bowl a flash drive for example, the space in the bowl cant be considered a vacuum as
flash drive is a matter.?
  Or vacuum cant exist in outer space as space is full of planets , stars, comets, debris....?
How do you measure a size of a vacuum? What is a smallest size of a vacuum?
Title: Re: When Vacuum Is Not A Vacuum?
Post by: alancalverd on 13/01/2019 22:44:02
A vacuum is the space between objects. The size of a vacuum is the distance between its containing surfaces. We tend to model the nucleus of an atom as a solid object, so the smallest vacuum will be the space between the nucleus and its nearest electron.
Title: Re: When Vacuum Is Not A Vacuum?
Post by: evan_au on 14/01/2019 09:08:35
Quote
As defined Vacuum is a space entirely devoid of matter
I guess that is a reasonable theoretical definition.

In practice, it is more useful to think of a vacuum in terms of the pressure of residual gas inside the chamber, it's temperature, and it's chemical/ionic composition.
- Whether you consider this a true vacuum depends on the application
- To the human body, the effects of exposure to the atmosphere of Mars (about 1% of the air pressure at Earth's surface) would be almost indistinguishable from the effects of exposure to interstellar space.
- If you are running the Large Hadron Collider, the air pressure of Mars would immediately block the proton beam.
- There are a variety of applications that require a vacuum between the atmosphere of Mars and the vacuum in the LHC
- There have been experiments put into space that delivered a better vacuum than that in the LHC. The simplest of these was a simple metal plate, orbiting the Earth at around 28,000km/h, blocking any gas molecules that might reach the experimental bay. (Of course, you need to make the metal plate out of substances that won't boil off atoms or molecules into the space behind the speeding plate...)