Naked Science Forum

On the Lighter Side => That CAN'T be true! => Topic started by: esquire on 07/08/2019 02:01:06

Title: Word salad: How well do laymen understand Bell's theorem?
Post by: esquire on 07/08/2019 02:01:06
with two filters at 90 degrees perpendicular, light is blocked and reflected back. since no light can passed it is laterally diffused.  when the second filter is turned to 45 degrees. 50% of the light is pass through, 50% is reflected back into the incoming light from the first filter.
this creates a qausi photonic wave capacitance.

when second filter is at 22.5 degrees, the light that passes through the second filter is at 85% not 75%. the additional 10% of light is a result of a larger gate and the immediate effect of the reflected light not yet diffused laterally.

when the two filters are at a 45% angle the gate is smaller and the diffusing process between filters is more prone to lateral leakage.

when a third filter is inserted betwen the first two filters. the reflected light becomes more apparent and an increase in  brightness is observed.

the reflected light with the incoming light is now sourced between the first and middle filter and the middle and last filter. the middle filter acts as a gate and a reflector between the flow of incoming and reflected light pools/reservoirs. brightness is not a measure of light it is a measure of reflected light.

the directionality of the incoming light is a straight line. the directionality of the reflected light is slightly diverted. this diversion creates a larger spread of illumination between the polarized filters. this accounts for leakage but it also accounts for larger illuminated surfaces between filters, which in turn increases brightness.

so adding additional filters is merely increasing the the reflected light between filters which increases brightness.

at what point will brightness supercede polarization? any arc welder knows the answer.

not certain that the example given is applicable to bell's theorem.
Title: Re: Word salad: How well do laymen understand Bell's theorem?
Post by: evan_au on 07/08/2019 06:34:12
Quote from: esquire
this creates a qausi photonic wave capacitance.
This creates a quasi nonsensical word salad.
Title: Re: Word salad: How well do laymen understand Bell's theorem?
Post by: Colin2B on 07/08/2019 06:42:17
Quote from: esquire
this creates a qausi photonic wave capacitance.
This creates a quasi nonsensical word salad.
Agreed. Par for the course for this poster.
Title: Re: Word salad: How well do laymen understand Bell's theorem?
Post by: esquire on 07/08/2019 14:34:25
Quote from: esquire
this creates a qausi photonic wave capacitance.
This creates a quasi nonsensical word salad.
Agreed. Par for the course for this poster.

can't be true! then quantum by its own definition can't be true.

Title: Re: Word salad: How well do laymen understand Bell's theorem?
Post by: yor_on on 07/08/2019 15:52:31
Bell's theorem is a statistical proof. That's also what makes it so hard to assimilate.

" A typical experiment involves the observation of particles, often photons, in an apparatus designed to produce entangled pairs and allow for the measurement of some characteristic of each, such as their spin. The results of the experiment could then be compared to what was predicted by local realism and those predicted by quantum mechanics.

In theory, the results could be "coincidentally" consistent with both. To address this problem, Bell proposed a mathematical description of local realism that placed a statistical limit on the likelihood of that eventuality. If the results of an experiment violate Bell's inequality, local hidden variables can be ruled out as their cause." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell_test_experiments

But this explanation seems pretty good. And as a bonus :) Discuss 'many worlds' considered from it too.
Do notice that ::))

https://www.quora.com/What-is-an-intuitive-explanation-of-Bells-theorem?share=1