Naked Science Forum

Non Life Sciences => Physics, Astronomy & Cosmology => Topic started by: talanum1 on 17/06/2020 12:07:47

Title: Why are Jupiter's Gasses not Evenly Mixed?
Post by: talanum1 on 17/06/2020 12:07:47
Why are Jupiter's gasses not mixed into a single even color?
Title: Re: Why are Jupiter's Gasses not Evenly Mixed?
Post by: chiralSPO on 17/06/2020 16:35:42
Probably similar reasons that the Earth has cloudy parts and non-cloudy parts of the atmosphere.

There are differences of course, but the underlying physics (and/or chemistry) is the same: there are differences in temperature and pressure throughout the atmosphere (and to a much greater extent for Jupiter than here!), and that leads to changes in phase (solid/liquid/gas/plasma) for the various components in the atmosphere, and that leads to local changes in composition (ie precipitation), as well as weather patterns (Jupiter has some very impressive storms, polar vortices, and jet streams). The belts and zones on Jupiter are a manifestation of the jet streams.

See more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmosphere_of_Jupiter
Title: Re: Why are Jupiter's Gasses not Evenly Mixed?
Post by: Europan Ocean on 22/06/2020 15:04:45
Perhaps the gravity separates them by weight and density... Only later are they stirred up by storms, and currents.