Naked Science Forum

Life Sciences => Physiology & Medicine => Topic started by: Donnah on 17/07/2020 01:13:23

Title: What is the best form of calcium supplementation for osteoporosis?
Post by: Donnah on 17/07/2020 01:13:23
What is the most absorbable form, and what's the difference between calcium and elemental calcium? How do vitamins D and K factor in? How much bone density can be recovered?
Title: Re: What is the best form of calcium supplementation for osteoporosis?
Post by: alancalverd on 17/07/2020 09:24:31
I've been working with a group that uses static loading to stimulate bone mass regrowth. No matter what supplements you take, if there is no mechanical stress on the bone, it won't regenerate - this is the problem with extended space flight.

Provided the cancellous bone hasn't completely degenerated and there is no underlying infection, static force against a spring for a few minutes a week seems to work very well to prevent osteoporosis and to some extent recover lost bone mass. The equipment looks a bit like a weight-training gym but the "weights" don't move and the spring force is self-calibrated against your own muscles. 

The recommendation is a normal diet and maybe 15 - 30  minutes per week in the "gym".
Title: Re: What is the best form of calcium supplementation for osteoporosis?
Post by: Colin2B on 17/07/2020 15:38:59
....... static force against a spring for a few minutes a week seems to work very well to prevent osteoporosis and to some extent recover lost bone mass.
What what level or range of resistance are you using?
Title: Re: What is the best form of calcium supplementation for osteoporosis?
Post by: alancalverd on 17/07/2020 21:14:14
For each exercise you simply push, pull, lift or whatever against a spring and a strain gauge for about 30 seconds, so the force you exert is up to you and is recorded. The exercises are designed to stress the skeleton rather than work the muscles, hence there is very little movement (around a centimeter or two) or repetition, unlike ordinary weight training. Natural self-competitiveness makes you want to at least repeat and preferably exceed your baseline at each visit, which generally happens, but the real target is to increase bone density, not muscle mass. And it seems to work.