Naked Science Forum

On the Lighter Side => New Theories => Topic started by: RobC on 10/01/2019 08:02:24

Title: Could our universe have an antimatter partner?
Post by: RobC on 10/01/2019 08:02:24
Neil Turok and his colleagues at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics are suggesting that an anti-universe before the Big Bang when time ran backwards and was dominated by antimatter instead of matter.

They say it naturally explains the existence of dark matter.
Title: Re: Could our universe have an antimatter partner?
Post by: mad aetherist on 10/01/2019 10:32:52
Neil Turok and his colleagues at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics are suggesting that an anti-universe before the Big Bang when time ran backwards and was dominated by antimatter instead of matter. They say it naturally explains the existence of dark matter.
They wouldnt have a clue what a universe was, what a bigbang was, what time is, & what anti-matter is, & what dark matter is, ie they are Einsteinists, or in Turok's case a Stringist.
There is no such thing as time, therefore time cant run forwards, & therefore it can hardly be said to run backwards.
I think that there might be several kinds of dark matter (& Turok's dark matter is sure to be krapp). But if u give me a link or something to their stupid paper i will be able to say more. Ok i found it.
https://physicsworld.com/a/our-universe-has-antimatter-partner-on-the-other-side-of-the-big-bang-say-physicists/

Turok adds that quantum uncertainty means that universe and antiuniverse are not exact mirror images of one another – which sidesteps thorny problems such as free will.
But problems aside, Turok says that the new model provides a natural candidate for dark matter. This candidate is an ultra-elusive, very massive particle called a “sterile” neutrino hypothesized to account for the finite (very small) mass of more common left-handed neutrinos. According to Turok, CPT symmetry can be used to work out the abundance of right-handed neutrinos in our universe from first principles. By factoring in the observed density of dark matter, he says that quantity yields a mass for the right-handed neutrino of about 5×108 GeV – some 500 million times the mass of the proton.

Turok describes that mass as “tantalizingly” similar to the one derived from a couple of anomalous radio signals spotted by the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA). The balloon-borne experiment, which flies high over Antarctica, generally observes cosmic rays travelling down through the atmosphere. However, on two occasions ANITA appears to have detected particles travelling up through the Earth with masses between 2 and 10×108 GeV. Given that ordinary neutrinos would almost certainly interact before getting that far, Thomas Weiler of Vanderbilt University and colleagues recently proposed that the culprits were instead decaying right-handed neutrinos.

Turok, however, points out a fly in the ointment – which is that the CPT symmetric model requires these neutrinos to be completely stable. But he remains cautiously optimistic. “It is possible to make these particles decay over the age of the universe but that takes a little adjustment of our model,” he says. “So we are still intrigued but I certainly wouldn’t say we are convinced at this stage.”

Yes, its worse than i could have imagined.
However nominating neutrinos as candidates for dark matter is ok.  Neutrinos are made of two photons whose fields cancel. And whereas if a free photon bits its own tail & forms a loop & becomes an elementary particle (electron quark etc) then if a neutrino does the same thing we have a dark elementary particle, however a DEP will not be able to form an atom (ie a dark atom). 
500 million times the mass of a proton is a worry. I would accept say that a dark electron was twice the mass of an electron.
Title: Re: Could our universe have an antimatter partner?
Post by: Bored chemist on 10/01/2019 11:08:34
Neil Turok and his colleagues at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics are suggesting that an anti-universe before the Big Bang when time ran backwards and was dominated by antimatter instead of matter. They say it naturally explains the existence of dark matter.
They wouldnt have a clue what a universe was, what a bigbang was, what time is, & what anti-matter is, & what dark matter is, ie they are Einsteinists, or in Turok's case a Stringist.
There is no such thing as time, therefore time cant run forwards, & therefore it can hardly be said to run backwards.
I think that there might be several kinds of dark matter (& Turok's dark matter is sure to be krapp). But if u give me a link or something to their stupid paper i will be able to say more. Ok i found it.
https://physicsworld.com/a/our-universe-has-antimatter-partner-on-the-other-side-of-the-big-bang-say-physicists/

Turok adds that quantum uncertainty means that universe and antiuniverse are not exact mirror images of one another – which sidesteps thorny problems such as free will.
But problems aside, Turok says that the new model provides a natural candidate for dark matter. This candidate is an ultra-elusive, very massive particle called a “sterile” neutrino hypothesized to account for the finite (very small) mass of more common left-handed neutrinos. According to Turok, CPT symmetry can be used to work out the abundance of right-handed neutrinos in our universe from first principles. By factoring in the observed density of dark matter, he says that quantity yields a mass for the right-handed neutrino of about 5×108 GeV – some 500 million times the mass of the proton.

Turok describes that mass as “tantalizingly” similar to the one derived from a couple of anomalous radio signals spotted by the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA). The balloon-borne experiment, which flies high over Antarctica, generally observes cosmic rays travelling down through the atmosphere. However, on two occasions ANITA appears to have detected particles travelling up through the Earth with masses between 2 and 10×108 GeV. Given that ordinary neutrinos would almost certainly interact before getting that far, Thomas Weiler of Vanderbilt University and colleagues recently proposed that the culprits were instead decaying right-handed neutrinos.

Turok, however, points out a fly in the ointment – which is that the CPT symmetric model requires these neutrinos to be completely stable. But he remains cautiously optimistic. “It is possible to make these particles decay over the age of the universe but that takes a little adjustment of our model,” he says. “So we are still intrigued but I certainly wouldn’t say we are convinced at this stage.”

Yes, its worse than i could have imagined.
However nominating neutrinos as candidates for dark matter is ok.  Neutrinos are made of two photons whose fields cancel. And whereas if a free photon bits its own tail & forms a loop & becomes an elementary particle (electron quark etc) then if a neutrino does the same thing we have a dark elementary particle, however a DEP will not be able to form an atom (ie a dark atom). 
500 million times the mass of a proton is a worry. I would accept say that a dark electron was twice the mass of an electron.
OK, so, either you are right, or everybody else is.

Which do you think we will bet on?
(BTW, the bit about neutrinos being two coupled photons doesn't work on grounds of spin and mass)
Title: Re: Could our universe have an antimatter partner?
Post by: mad aetherist on 10/01/2019 12:46:25
OK, so, either you are right, or everybody else is. Which do you think we will bet on? (BTW, the bit about neutrinos being two coupled photons doesn't work on grounds of spin and mass)
I am thinking that i might be correct or they might be correct or none of us are correct (or all of us are correct)(unlikely). In effect u are saying that i am on my own, no, i reckon that about a half of scientists are not happy with standard science, & a large chunk of them are ok with aether.
If i were u i would bet on the Einsteinists -- they own the casino & the bank. But who would u bet with -- & who would decide.
Neutrinos being coupled photons, if that doesnt work then i would have a closer look at the work.
Title: Re: Could our universe have an antimatter partner?
Post by: Bored chemist on 10/01/2019 12:47:18
i reckon...
Prove it.
Title: Re: Could our universe have an antimatter partner?
Post by: mad aetherist on 10/01/2019 12:50:19
i reckon...
Prove it.
Easy, every proper MMX ever done shows an aetherwind. Hencely SR & GR are krapp. And most scientists know this.
Einsteinology is a religion. It reminds me that years ago a survey showed that 1 in 14 denizens of theusofa answered that they were atheist. But a follow up of those that had answered to being hard core Christians showed that 1 in 16 admitted to being closet atheists. More modern surveys give numbers like 20% of Christians & 30% of denizens.
Jews are mostly atheist, because the religious part of it is not important to them, the race language history etc bit is why they are happy to go along with it. But the fundamentalist sect might be 1% atheist.
Einsteinology is more cultish than Christianity, if u dont kowtow u loose your job, your funding, your telescope time, your access to mainstream journals, etc.  So the figures must be even higher. I daresay that hardcore Einsteinists might be say 10%, scientists that are hardcore (but closet) aetherists might be 10% (& the number admitting to being aetherist would be 0%), & agnostics say 80% (& the number admitting this would too be nearnuff 0%). A cult if i ever saw one. Not a lot of difference to Scientology.
In godly religions being an agnostic makes u an atheist, but in science being an agnostic doesnt mean that u are an aetherist, but i think that if u think it out a bit better u will agree that it does make u an aetherist of some kind or another (what with every non-Einsteinian theory involving some sort of fundamental underlying excited fluid or string or something, a kind of aether theory).  And even Einstein was an aetherist in the end.