Identify this rock/mineral?

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Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #50 on: 13/11/2007 20:53:24 »




Quote from: Bass
You might question your clever book then, Apatite (calcium phosphate) is non-metallic

**throws book away **

I give up

...this round that is

***goes looking on amazon for another rock book***


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Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #51 on: 13/11/2007 21:01:49 »
Is it noticeably dense?
Close to, but a bit more dense than hematite (iron oxide) Fe2O3

I was right I thought it looked like iron oxide but I thought I was wrong with the quartz so I kept my mouth shut! LOL Dang... I should have said it! LOL!LOL! I actually collected rocks for years, but my son got into 5th grade and I donated my collection to the school as they had nothing to teach the kids as they had very few rocks and I had tons! LOL... I wish I still had them...... They were cool... Is it possible to miss your rock collection??? LOL My old friends! LOL... Better go before I dig myself a hole and fossilize!

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Offline frethack

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« Reply #52 on: 14/11/2007 02:42:53 »
Quote
Good thought, Molly would be proud of you.


Hehehe...a very subtle hint.  I didnt get it until I looked up the streak and hardness.

Molybdenite...MoS2

Hardness of 1 to 1 1/2
Specific Gravity 4.7 to 4.8
Perfect cleavage, inelastically flexible, with a hexagonal crystal system
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Offline frethack

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« Reply #53 on: 14/11/2007 02:46:18 »
btw Alandriel...you might try the Handbook of Rocks Minerals & Gemstones by Walter Schumann.  I like it quite a bit.  Not the best, but very well organized and cheap.
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Offline Bass

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« Reply #54 on: 14/11/2007 05:40:38 »
Frethack pulls the rabbit out of the hat!  Twice!  In a row! 

Careful, or we might force you out of the closet for your geological leanings.  I thought surely someone would guess argentite.  I'll have to save that one for another day.
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Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #55 on: 15/11/2007 11:31:39 »
Argentite. Right - lol - did the naming of that have anything to do with Argentina by any chance?

Thanks Frethack I'll definitely chase up that book recommendation.


Now.......................


may I ??

What is *this* (from my collection)






100 points to the one that can name the rock and place where I've found it (or rather haggled it from some native kids).
And a box of choccies to the one that names me the fishies (been dying to know for years!)
 [;D]

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Offline Bass

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« Reply #56 on: 16/11/2007 00:08:27 »
Cool fish!  They don't look deformed, so my guess for rock type is shale or siltite (not metamorphosed).  Old lake beds? 
Paleontology is not my area- so can't help with the fishies.  JimBob is better at this soft rock stuff, maybe he can help?
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Offline JimBob

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« Reply #57 on: 16/11/2007 01:00:38 »
The best I can do is to say the fish are Teleost - bony ray finned fish. I never was any good at Vertebrate Paleontolgy.

In the NEW order of life - as opposed to the one I learned in the dark ages just after Linnaeus started work, these are classified as --

Kingdom:    Animalia
Phylum:    Chordata
Class:     Actinopterygii
Infraclass:    Teleostei

As for the rock; without doubt sedimentary and it looks like there may be some evaporate deposits (alabaster??) in it. Does the white stuff seem fairly soft - i.e., is it readily scratchable  Knowing the location of your book, Red Sea Sebkah deposits, Egypt to Horn of Africa  - with carbonates and silt - alternately out of water part of the year or longer and then brief periods of holding water that connected to a larger source of water, probably salty, the obvious Red Sea.

Then again, You could have gotten it from the Gobi Desert. What do I know?
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Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #58 on: 16/11/2007 13:49:14 »

Gobi desert!?!   *******sighhhh *****   I wish

But yeah, it seems you know 'my book' too well and have a good fix on location LOL.
I got it from Syria - not exactly Red Sea but close enough.

Teleost - bony raw fish is a good enough fix for me and enough to go reference hunting. Cheerio!

PM me your addy and I shall keep my promise; name your fav choc poison or be surprised.
 [;D]

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Offline JimBob

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« Reply #59 on: 16/11/2007 17:12:02 »
BUT what about the rock - is it even close? - limestone, shale & possible anhydrite?
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Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #60 on: 19/11/2007 16:43:19 »
I have NO idea - *YOU* are the expert!  [;D]

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Offline JimBob

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« Reply #61 on: 20/11/2007 01:13:49 »
Then I am right

(I'll look at it next summer on my trip to London.)
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Offline Bass

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« Reply #62 on: 20/03/2008 00:55:08 »
Identify the blue-black mineral in the schist matrix.

[attachment=2534]

hint: hardness varies depending on direction
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Offline JimBob

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« Reply #63 on: 20/03/2008 18:56:12 »
Tourmaline
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Offline Bass

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« Reply #64 on: 20/03/2008 22:06:40 »
not!

see hint
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Offline Exodus

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« Reply #65 on: 22/03/2008 19:09:02 »
Argentite. Right - lol - did the naming of that have anything to do with Argentina by any chance?

Thanks Frethack I'll definitely chase up that book recommendation.


Now.......................


may I ??

What is *this* (from my collection)






100 points to the one that can name the rock and place where I've found it (or rather haggled it from some native kids).
And a box of choccies to the one that names me the fishies (been dying to know for years!)
 [;D]


hmmm yes, i've seen one of those before, its a fossilised fish tank.

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Offline JimBob

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« Reply #66 on: 22/03/2008 20:39:05 »
Smart Ar.....
The mind is like a parachute. It works best when open.  -- A. Einstein

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Offline frethack

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« Reply #67 on: 26/03/2008 15:19:47 »
How about Kyanite?
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Offline Bass

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« Reply #68 on: 26/03/2008 17:15:44 »
I knew I could count on frethack! 
Kyanite's hardness varies from 5 to 7 depending on the crystal direction.  The mineral is an aluminum silicate Al2SiO5, and is a polymorph of two other minerals- sillimanite and andalusite (that is, they have the same chemical composition, but form different crystals).

Metamorphic mineral that typically forms in high aluminum sedimentary rocks (shales) that undergo changes due to high temperatures/pressures.
« Last Edit: 27/03/2008 20:20:17 by Bass »
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Offline frethack

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« Reply #69 on: 26/03/2008 22:52:02 »
Never thought Id hear myself say this, but I cant wait for mineralogy :)

Theres a good chance Ill be moving to JimBobs neck of the woods soon.  Barring some funkiness with my credits, I should be UT bound.

Ill have to find a few mineral pics to post!
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Offline Bass

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« Reply #70 on: 27/03/2008 00:05:52 »
Good luck at UT!

Keep in mind that all the really interesting minerals are hard-rock (metamorphic-igneous).  Don't be swayed by those lazy soft-rockers.
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Offline JimBob

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« Reply #71 on: 27/03/2008 01:25:00 »
Hook 'em Horns!!!! They are on to the next round of March Madness.

I haven't been able to do much of anything for the past two weeks. My father became rater ill at the nursing home and died last Friday as a result. His funeral is tomorrow. He was almost 91. After I finish the Eulogy I am giving I will post it, probably Saturday or Sunday, depending on family obligations. It is something I want to do.

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Offline frethack

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« Reply #72 on: 27/03/2008 02:44:53 »
My condolences.
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Offline JimBob

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« Reply #73 on: 27/03/2008 02:59:10 »
Thank you.
The mind is like a parachute. It works best when open.  -- A. Einstein

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Offline frethack

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« Reply #74 on: 27/03/2008 20:12:14 »
Sillimanite and Kyanite are idex minerals to determine metamorphic grade, but is a(n?)dalusite also?  (I suppose I could look it up, but that would be less fun  [:)] )
« Last Edit: 27/03/2008 20:14:12 by frethack »
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Offline Bass

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« Reply #75 on: 27/03/2008 20:21:45 »
The short answer- yes.

The presence of andalusite indicates certain temperature/pressure conditions- different from sillmanite and kyanite.
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Offline Bass

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« Reply #76 on: 21/06/2008 17:43:35 »
Two minerals, one orangish red, the other yellow (ignore black matrix rock)

[attachment=3424]
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Offline JimBob

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« Reply #77 on: 22/06/2008 16:38:02 »
realgar and orpiment

if substrait isn't important, then the minerals are probably hydrothermal in origin.
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Offline Bored chemist

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« Reply #78 on: 22/06/2008 19:42:51 »
Nice colour. Planning to poison anyone?
Please disregard all previous signatures.

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Offline JimBob

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« Reply #79 on: 22/06/2008 21:24:20 »
i read a lot of Agatha Christi.
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Offline Bass

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« Reply #80 on: 23/06/2008 00:56:53 »
From one of the sed-hosted epithermal gold deposits in northern Nevada.  Orpiment and realgar (arsenic sulfides) are indicator minerals for these sorts of deposits.
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Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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« Reply #81 on: 23/06/2008 08:46:58 »
i read a lot of Agatha Christi.
Jimbob.We live near Greenway. Agatha's home. It is on the River Dart in a beautiful setting with impressive gardens. Her tennis court is behind a walled in garden. We frequently walk the dogs down there and enjoy a cup of coffee in the café.

There is a huge clock above her place and I remember seeing the same picture of the clock somewhere else, possibly on a cover of one of her books.

The courtyard is granite cobblestones (3 times above background gamma radiation levels)

I will put some pictures on photobucket for you.
Science is continually evolving. Nothing is set in stone. Question everything and everyone. Always consider vested interests as a reason for miss-direction. But most of all explore and find answers that you are comfortable with

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Offline Evie

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« Reply #82 on: 15/09/2008 21:53:17 »
I want a new picture!!!   Pretty please? [:X] [:X]
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Than are dreamt of in your philosophy."
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Offline Bass

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« Reply #83 on: 16/09/2008 00:51:31 »
Really don't have time for this, but since you asked so nicely....
What is the pink mineral?

[attachment=4618]

[attachment=4620]

I'll be back in 2-3 days, have fun with it till then.

Not so subtle hint:  Not flourite
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Offline Evie

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« Reply #84 on: 16/09/2008 16:20:25 »
Rhodochrosite?
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Offline Bass

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« Reply #85 on: 17/09/2008 06:33:39 »
Ahhh

Good guess, probably would have been my first guess as well.  But sorry, no Mn.
But as you have guessed, it is a secondary mineral (formed during weathering of another mineral).  When looking for deposits containing this metal, this mineral is the blooming key.
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Offline Evie

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« Reply #86 on: 17/09/2008 15:44:10 »
Jeez...your hints have got my head going in a few different directions, but I guess I'll throw out another idea and see if it sticks...


Apatite?  [???]
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Offline frethack

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« Reply #87 on: 18/09/2008 03:27:22 »
I happen to poke my nose up from my books (4 tests in three days...just finished my sed rocks exam today) and - lo and behold - another mineral!  Ill take a stab in the dark at it.

How about Erythrite (the pink) and Cobaltkoritnigite (the purple).

Both secondary minerals in cobalt bearing deposits (Cobalt blooms).

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Offline Evie

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« Reply #88 on: 18/09/2008 16:12:32 »
I happen to poke my nose up from my books (4 tests in three days...just finished my sed rocks exam today) and - lo and behold - another mineral!  Ill take a stab in the dark at it.

How about Erythrite (the pink) and Cobaltkoritnigite (the purple).

Both secondary minerals in cobalt bearing deposits (Cobalt blooms).



Ah, that sounds good!

My minerology is so rusty (no pun intended), but that's why I love this thread. It makes me exercise my flaccid brain muscles!
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Offline Bass

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« Reply #89 on: 20/09/2008 19:30:19 »
I see that frethack can concentrate on his mineralogy while the old curmudgeon is drinking mint juleps in Kentucky.  Nice going!

Erythrite, or "cobalt bloom" is the main indicator for cobalt deposits.  Just so happens that two days after I posted this, I ran across erythrite in a place that shouldn't have any cobalt:

[attachment=4664]

(my digital camera seems to have a problem distinguishing blue from purple- the dark blue is actually purple erythrite) [???]
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Offline Bass

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« Reply #90 on: 20/09/2008 19:45:48 »
An easy one.

This mineral's crystal form is hexagonal (six sided) prisms:

  [attachment=4666]

image from mindat.org

impurities make valuable gemstones.
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Offline frethack

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« Reply #91 on: 21/09/2008 22:28:34 »
Im guessing its something like this...




I need to take a photography course...no matter what camera I use, my closeups are always blurry...grrr.  As soon as I can learn to take a photograph, Ill post a couple of minerals.

Anyway...Corundum :)

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Offline JimBob

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« Reply #92 on: 23/09/2008 22:51:14 »
I see that frethack can concentrate on his mineralogy while the old curmudgeon is drinking mint juleps in Kentucky.  Nice going!

At least he posted this answer from his own computer, not my computer workstation on which he WAS SUPPOSED TO HAVE BEEN WORKING!!!!! He has committed this sin and then, when caught, blatantly said the time WILL appear on his next time sheet. Uppity young brat. Working with ArcGIS stuff is what he was to have been doing  - no. digitizing gravity data, that's it.
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Offline frethack

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« Reply #93 on: 24/09/2008 00:39:53 »
Hehehe...not just the time JimBob, but the burger as well...double meat, double cheese.  Youre lucky I didnt get any grease on my shirt...I just might have included the dry cleaning!  [;D]
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Offline Pyroxene88

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« Reply #94 on: 14/11/2008 02:27:57 »
Here's a rock for you guys to ID! I'm not positive on what it is exactly, and any information it would be great!



Yes, the slab is wet because it still has saw marks that makes it hard to see what it is.

newbielink:http://pics.livejournal.com/spoinger/pic/0001zatt/ [nonactive]

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Offline JimBob

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« Reply #95 on: 14/11/2008 03:05:36 »
The substrait is carpet. I know that. Geeze!

The other thing looks like part of a very spoiled and moldy specked trout.

Oh, by the way, I HATED mineralogy so I became a sedimentologist by default. And don't blame me for not knowing. Without me, all you hard rock guys would be freezing in the dark and riding horses - no heating oil, no coal, no natural gas = no heaters, energy or internal combustion engines. 

In fact I deserve a vote of thanks!

By the way did your wife give you any grief for getting the diamond saw oil on the carpet?????

Oh, By the way

WELCOME TO TNS !!!!! Hope you enjoy, join the fray, and add another rock nut to the mix!

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Offline frethack

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« Reply #96 on: 14/11/2008 05:05:18 »
Without any information on hardness and using the carpet fibers for scale, Im going to venture a guess of Aventurine, though the possible presence of cleavage might suggest otherwise.

Any chance for a closeup pic of the dried sample?  Hard to tell if the dark and purple patches are crystals or inclusions.  Maybe even pics of the uncut side?

« Last Edit: 14/11/2008 05:06:56 by frethack »
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Offline RD

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« Reply #97 on: 14/11/2008 05:22:28 »
Pyroxene88's sample...

[attachment=5282]
« Last Edit: 14/11/2008 05:24:03 by RD »

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Offline Bass

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« Reply #98 on: 14/11/2008 16:27:06 »
Purple-brown mineral appears to be harder and better crystallized than green-- probably garnet family.

My initial quick impression is eclogite.

But with no strongly developed planar mineral orientation, possibly skarn?  Where did you collect this specimen?
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Offline JimBob

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« Reply #99 on: 15/11/2008 16:06:16 »
He found it in California or the Grenville province.

I suspect this is probably the sorosilicate idocrase, otherwise known as vesuvianite (also called Calforniaite) Since the associated minerals of green idocrase are garnets, calcite, wollastonite (one of these white minerals filling some of the fractures,) diopsid (dark linear non-garnet-lookng mineral) and serpentine. The cutting oil changes the actual colors. There is a ghost of hexagonal garnet crystal form on the left of the specimine just beyond the end of the white-filled vein.

From the carpet, I would guess that it is from the Grenville Province - unless it is from Italy.


See - I'm not as dumb as I look. I can be reasonably conversant in mineralogy (I can use a search engine) - and I keep you sissies warm.
« Last Edit: 18/11/2008 01:31:08 by JimBob »
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