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Offline neilep

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« on: 11/11/2007 19:52:23 »
"Don't know why, there's no sun up in the sky
Stormy weather, since my man and I ain't together
Keeps raining all the time"

Post your piccys of weather/climate fun and joy right here !!

[attachment=1431]


PLEASE REMEMBER TO CREDIT THE SOURCE FOR ANY MATERIAL YOU POST HERE.

« Last Edit: 12/12/2007 20:50:11 by neilep »
Men are the same as women, just inside out !

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Offline neilep

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« Reply #1 on: 12/11/2007 02:06:53 »
My Own Contribution From Another Thread with TECHMINDS text !!

[attachment=1443]

This is what is known as a sundog.
This Google image-search will show many more examples: http://images.google.co.uk/images?sourceid=navclient&q=sundog

There's an explanation here: http://www.atoptics.co.uk/halo/parhelia.htm

In fact the whole of that site looks very nice, see: http://www.atoptics.co.uk/

Men are the same as women, just inside out !

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Offline Karen W.

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« Last Edit: 12/11/2007 11:41:33 by Karen W. »

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #3 on: 12/11/2007 02:25:39 »
« Last Edit: 12/11/2007 11:20:51 by Karen W. »

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline Karen W.

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« Last Edit: 20/01/2008 07:54:13 by Karen W. »

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline Bass

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« Reply #5 on: 12/11/2007 05:06:56 »
Sunset during the recent fires.  Unaltered photo, red is from smoke

[attachment=1448].
Old enough to have a grandson
Slow enough to study rocks
Thirsty enough to find a pub

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Offline Carolyn

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« Reply #6 on: 12/11/2007 18:29:58 »
This is the storm surge in our town from Hurricane Dennis in 2005.





Carolyn

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Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #7 on: 12/11/2007 21:57:55 »
Yiiikes Carolyn! Your house?!?!? I hope not.

Sundog?! Never heard of that before. Interesting! Thanks for that Neil and the links  [;D]


Lightening it is for me too Karen ...... all the way!! Especially horizontal  YAY!!!!  [O8)]





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Offline neilep

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« Reply #8 on: 14/11/2007 02:00:36 »
WATERSPOUTS


A waterspout is an intense columnar vortex (usually appearing as a funnel-shaped cloud) that occurs over a body of water and is connected to a cumuliform cloud. In the common form, it is a nonsupercell tornado over water, and brings the water upward. Also, it is weaker than most of its land counterparts

[attachment=1504]

[attachment=1506]

[attachment=1508]

[attachment=1510]




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Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #9 on: 21/11/2007 21:33:09 »

Sandstorm


This particular one in Iraq: April 26, 2005

More pics: http://www.hprcc.unl.edu/nebraska/iraq-sandstorm.html




I remember times as a kid going skiing and finding red sand on top of our Swiss mountains. That was wierd!

In Egypt we used to get seasonal sand storms called: chameseen (means 50 in arabic and referrs to a period of 50 days of westerly winds often bringing tons of sand)

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Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #10 on: 09/12/2007 21:16:38 »
Aurora borealis











.... perhaps one day I'm so lucky......

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paul.fr

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« Reply #11 on: 13/01/2008 17:03:33 »
Met office produced pressure chart for the 'great storm' of October 1987

[attachment=2038]

Quote
An intense, and almost certainly exceptional, depression crossed the coast of South Devon soon after midnight, moving quickly, and deepening rapidly, with a track across the Midlands and out towards the Humber Estuary. Some very severe conditions due to storm force winds were generated around the southern and eastern flank of the low, with gust well in excess of 70 knots, reaching a peak in the period 0300GMT to 0700GMT, with gusts to 90 knots reported along the south coast. The very stormy conditions were accompanied by some heavy rain, this rain pushing into Scotland and parts of Northern Ireland after dawn.
Clearer weather, on westerly winds, swept across southern Britain, pushing the worst of the stormy winds away into the North sea. During the afternoon the country settled down to a blustery westerly with some heavy and thundery showers developing in clusters, running especially into western and southern coastal regions and parts of southeast England. Across Scotland and northern England the skies remained cloudy, with outbreaks of mostly light rain, but troughs enhanced the showers in the northwest later in the evening with heavy rain.
It was a rather cold day in most places, although the temperatures were near normal in the southeast.

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Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #12 on: 13/01/2008 18:25:03 »
Aurora borealis











.... perhaps one day I'm so lucky......

Alandiel.. Those piccy's are so beautiful.. Would'nt that be an incredible site up close and personal! WOW! Very nice!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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paul.fr

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« Reply #13 on: 19/01/2008 23:01:00 »
This is my local power station, just a few miles down the road...oh, and it's raining...again.
[attachment=2164]

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Offline Simulated

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« Reply #14 on: 20/01/2008 01:56:10 »
That igloo one was so amazing!



Just messing!!




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Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #15 on: 30/01/2008 19:57:35 »
Sunset pictures are soooooo cliche - I know









Sunset over North Pole






















..... but still nice!  [;D]

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paul.fr

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« Reply #16 on: 08/02/2008 12:29:46 »
Polar stratospheric, Nacreous clouds, also known as "Mother of pearl clouds"
Bilal Chaudhry.

[attachment=2328]

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paul.fr

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« Reply #17 on: 16/02/2008 23:06:43 »
Lenticularis over Trentino. Italy.
Evamaria Cola.

[attachment=2370]

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Offline Simulated

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paul.fr

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« Reply #19 on: 16/11/2008 14:49:58 »
Pileus (cap) cloud, atop a cumulus cloud

[attachment=5290]

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paul.fr

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« Reply #20 on: 16/11/2008 14:53:21 »
A cumulonimbus cloud.

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Offline dentstudent

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« Reply #21 on: 18/11/2008 15:11:20 »
Pileus (cap) cloud, atop a cumulus cloud

[attachment=5290]

If it was at ground level, would it be Pileus Fog?

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Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #22 on: 25/11/2008 06:55:51 »
Hi,
[attachment=5361]

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paul.fr

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« Reply #23 on: 05/12/2008 13:53:09 »
Like me, this cloud is just lovelly!

[attachment=5530]

(a heart with an arrow through it...)

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paul.fr

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« Reply #24 on: 05/12/2008 13:54:44 »
and I thought this one looked just like the shadow vessel in Babylon 5

[attachment=5532]

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Offline dentstudent

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« Reply #25 on: 05/12/2008 14:34:56 »
or it could be a giant prawn...

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Offline maimai

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« Reply #26 on: 15/12/2008 04:16:55 »
The picture you all posted are various. One of them are landscape, I guess so because they are beautiful. Some are disaster, right? And one of these pictures look magical. This is just my feeling. How about you?

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Offline elmejor

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« Reply #27 on: 20/12/2008 06:39:49 »
some where in the Caribbean:


one of the most beautiful sunsets:
newbielink:http://www.earthforenergykits.com [nonactive]

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Offline RD

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« Reply #28 on: 20/12/2008 14:10:51 »

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Offline elmejor

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« Reply #29 on: 23/12/2008 11:54:24 »
thanx RD for giving the link to Andrew T. Young's Sunsets, thats really some study of sunsets this fellow has done. dont you think so?
newbielink:http://www.earthforenergykits.com [nonactive]

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Offline RD

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« Reply #30 on: 23/12/2008 14:07:26 »
The green flash phenomenon only lasts a few seconds, (I've never seen it, I think few people have).

I should include the usual warning here that looking at the sun can permanently damage eyesight...

Quote
The brightness changes by a factor of two every minute near sunrise and sunset,
so an error of just a minute or two can make the difference between eye safety and eye injury.
http://mintaka.sdsu.edu/GF/observing/advice.html

Looking at the sun on the monitor screen of a digital camera would be much safer: worse-case-scenario you need a new camera,
 (the camera CCD has an sun image permanently burned on to it). Unlike cameras eyes are not replaceable.
« Last Edit: 23/12/2008 14:11:32 by RD »

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Offline Simulated

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« Reply #31 on: 31/01/2009 18:03:57 »
I've taken over 140 pictures this winter so far.. Here's a few of my favorites













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Offline beem

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« Reply #32 on: 05/02/2009 19:21:58 »
Why are some people excited by the prospect of an arriving thunderstorm (despite the known and obvious risks of property damage)?

Yet some people say they feel nothing. 

I'm excited just looking at this:



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Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #33 on: 06/02/2009 05:57:55 »
Me too.. but The excitement is real excitement I enjoy the feeling in the air during a storm its presence and awesomeness is something that sends energy through your body.. everything feels alive!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline beem

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« Reply #34 on: 06/02/2009 16:29:39 »
And everything's greener after a thunderstorm!  I suppose it's the rawness of its power that is so exhilarating [:)]

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Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #35 on: 07/02/2009 00:27:32 »
Yes exactly! I feel like a little kid who wants to run outside and release lots of pent up energy when a storm comes....

Kids will do that when it storms they get to being a ball full of fire and really need to release a bit of steam to calm down.. It must do something to the human body and stir up all your molecules or something...

I love storms the louder the windier the better.. Then it becomes completely crazy.. not to afraid of storms I rather like them.. but am cautious about the lightening my cousin was struck a few times.. still living and she is fine.. but none of us no why!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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paul.fr

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« Reply #36 on: 12/03/2009 14:27:05 »
..[attachment=7431]..
On August 18, 1996, several dozen big wildfires were each burning from 40,000 to over 100,000 acres in the West. In this GOES-8 visible satellite image, the smoke plumes from the northern California blazes stand out well. The Fork Fire plume, which extended east-northeastward over 400 miles across northern Nevada, originated from a 45,000 acre blaze near Upper Lake. Smoke from ten smaller fires, close to Stanislaus forest and Yosemite NP, congealed into the southeastern plume. Upper air maps showed 40-50 knot west-southwest flow along the track of the Fork Fire plume, and 20-40 knots with the Stanislaus/Yosemite plume. (Fire locations/sizes from Reuters)

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paul.fr

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« Reply #37 on: 12/03/2009 14:29:47 »
..[attachment=7433]..
During the day on 19 Jun 1998, as on many late spring days, a sea breeze front moved inland from the Gulf coast across the Florida Panhandle and coastal bend. The cooler, relatively stable marine air behind the front was almost cloud-free, while thousands of small cumulus clouds prevailed along the front and farther inland. Sea breeze fronts often explode with thunderstorms, as vertical circulations along them lift hot and moist air upward through weak capping inversions. During this day, however, the air mass was too capped for thundertsorms along this part of the sea breeze front -- everywhere but over an intense forest fire in Suwannee County, Florida, near the town of Live Oak.

As the sea breeze front passed over the fire, the rising motion of the hot air off the fire combined with lift along the front; and a thunderstorm erupted. The smoke from that fire is a thin gray plume extending eastward from the thunderstorm in the image above. If your browser is configured for Javascript capability, you can see this process from space in this javascript loop of thunderstorm formation over the fire. [This loop will take several minutes to load on modem connections.]

Instead of aiding fire fighters with heavy rain, such storms can actually hamper fire suppression efforts by producing strong downdrafts, erratic winds, and additional lightning-started fires. In Florida, the ground and vegetation had been badly desiccated after months of scant rainfall, making conditions ideal for wildfires to start and spread.

Fires across FL during the spring of 1998 killed 3 people, destroyed at least 370 homes and vast tracts of field and forest, forcing the closure of much of I-95 and postponing the July 4 races at the Daytona speedway. Every county in the state had fires.

http://www.spc.noaa.gov/coolimg/flfirecb/index.html

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paul.fr

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« Reply #38 on: 12/03/2009 14:30:54 »
..[attachment=7435]..

Someone did not spray "silly string" all over the middlke of this satellite picture. Instead, the spaghetti-like cloud formations offshore from Washington and from Vancouver Island, BC, are cloud trails created in thin stratus by the exhaust of ships. These are loosely similar to ice-crystal clouds (contrails) generated by jet aircraft at high altitudes; except here they form clouds of water droplets. The machines producing them are much more slowly moving too, of course.

The day-long development and motion of these plumes is shown and described in more detail in this 4 MB image loop. You can track several ships by following the progress of the leading edges of their trails.

http://www.spc.noaa.gov/coolimg/shiplume/index.html

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paul.fr

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« Reply #39 on: 16/03/2009 04:16:40 »
A gallery of pictures depicting life on a Russian North Pole Drifting Station
http://nsidc.org/arcticmet/

During summer, melt ponds posed hazards to the camp. Here, a station member rows an inflatable raft in a melt pond that has formed in the middle of the camp at NP-6.

[attachment=7493]

Not all of the ice phenomena on the ice floes were naturally occurring. Station members sometimes made the most of their surroundings, witnessed in this polar bear made of snow.

[attachment=7497]

[attachment=7495]

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paul.fr

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« Reply #40 on: 17/03/2009 16:58:59 »
Lightning over Brisbane

[attachment=7527]
[attachment=7529]
[attachment=7531]

http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,23739,25199663-5018248,00.html

14,000 lightning strikes in storm - this is how they count them

March 17, 2009 11:35am

THE state's southeast recorded 82 lightning strikes every minute during Monday night's storm as 14,000 bolts lit up the sky.

The spectacular light show also resulted in 39 strokes per minute in Brisbane reported by Global Positioning and Tracking System (GPATs), an Australian company which provides lightning tracking devices and applications to the Bureau of Meteorology.

Duncan McDonald, GPAT's engineer and software developer, said the state-of-the-art system can detect the time and position of lightning under a second after it strikes.

"We have 32 lightning detection receivers around Australia, each with GPS installed in them so we know exactly where and when lightning hits," Mr McDonald said.

When lightning strikes, an electromagnetic wavefront propagates from where it hits.

The receiver catches the wavefront and calculates when it strikes.

"If at least two receivers detect the same strike, it can work out from the time of arrival where the lightning struck," he said.

Mr McDonald said lightning is so sporadic that it is difficult to calculate an average for the number of strokes per storm, even over a period of 10 years.

Along with power and insurance companies, which employ the data for research and insurance claims, mining companies are GPAT's main clients using the information collected for safety measures as lightning can cause explosions if it hits the wrong place.

The Bureau of Meteorology also is using the information collected by GPATs for further investigation on whether some of the Victorian bushfires were a result lightning strikes or arson.

Monday's severe weather with gusting winds up to 80km/h brought down trees and powerlines leaving around 17, 000 homes and businesses without power.

The Lockyer Valley, Brisbane Valley, Ipswich and surrounds and parts of the Gold Coast and hinterland were the worst hit areas.

Energex crews had restored power to more than 13,000 homes and businesses last night with the rest being reconnected at about 6.30am.

The thunderstorms should result in a slight increase in dam levels for Brisbane after 47mm fell in the Wivenhoe catchment area.

Storms lash south east - photo gallery
http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/gallery/0,23816,5037952-17382,00.html

Spectacular lightning storms - gallery
http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/gallery/0,22056,5029621-5010140,00.html#

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« Reply #41 on: 02/04/2009 14:03:22 »
#  Oldest known photograph of a tornado.
# Photo date : August 28, 1884.
# Location : 22 miles southwest of Howard, South Dakota.
# Source : National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Photo Library. Image ID: wea00206, Historic NWS Collection. Found at http://www.photolib.noaa.gov/historic/nws/wea00206.htm

[attachment=7861]

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Offline 112inky

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« Reply #42 on: 05/05/2009 16:58:19 »
Sundog?! Never heard of that before. Interesting! Thanks for that Neil and the links 
 
it's very new to me



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paul.fr

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« Reply #43 on: 11/08/2009 21:18:03 »





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Offline norcalclimber

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« Reply #44 on: 09/06/2010 20:12:31 »
Picture I took from the front deck of my house looking east at part of the Sierra Nevada mountain range:
[attachment=12191]

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Offline norcalclimber

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« Reply #45 on: 09/06/2010 20:13:18 »
Another cloud picture from my front deck:
[attachment=12193]

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Offline theonlinestuff

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« Reply #46 on: 10/06/2010 13:22:51 »
cool stuff

now em also soon going to post photos

cyrs Khan

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Offline norcalclimber

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« Reply #47 on: 10/06/2010 18:31:59 »
Another picture of clouds I took yesterday:[attachment=12209]

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Offline norcalclimber

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« Reply #48 on: 11/06/2010 05:42:02 »
More of my favorite new pics from the new camera :)

[attachment=12214]

[attachment=12216]

[attachment=12218]

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Offline tartanthing

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« Reply #49 on: 03/07/2011 16:18:37 »
Noctilucent Clouds?
I'm hoping someone can verify these pics as Noctilucent Clouds. I took them 3/7/11 at 3am, facing north in glasgow (geotagged via picasa!). I couldn't get any foreground reference points because of light pollution, but the first pic has an orange glow at the bottom from a nearby street light. They appear as the camera took them, but in reality they were a lot brighter, I am fiddling about with colour levels to try and get it closer to how it appeared.
newbielink:https://picasaweb.google.com/tartanthing/NoctilucentClouds?authkey=Gv1sRgCLzh7LHj7POH2QE [nonactive]






Just for fun here's a couple of other pics of a frosty morning on the road to Milford Sound in NZ that I took, neither of them have been adjusted.
newbielink:https://picasaweb.google.com/tartanthing/MilfordRoad?authkey=Gv1sRgCM3KuK_f3tC2cQ [nonactive]



hope the links work, if not let me know!