Electric vehicles.

  • 4 Replies
  • 2573 Views

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

*

Offline Pumblechook

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • 569
    • View Profile
Electric vehicles.
« on: 09/12/2007 18:00:07 »
Impractical with the technology we have today?

*

lyner

  • Guest
Electric vehicles.
« Reply #1 on: 09/12/2007 18:06:17 »
Presumable you are not referring to trains and trams?

*

Offline Pumblechook

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • 569
    • View Profile
Electric vehicles.
« Reply #2 on: 09/12/2007 18:08:04 »
Only vehicles which have to store or produce their own electricity. 

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Electric vehicles.
« Reply #3 on: 09/12/2007 19:00:20 »
Impractical with the technology we have today?

Impractical for what?

If you are doing a journey of 10 to 20 miles a day, then we already have some vehicles that do that (more two wheeled vehicles than 4 wheeled vehicles, although we have both).  If you are looking to travel 200+ miles a day, then we are not there yet.

In fact, we have had electric milk floats (5mph max, local journeys only) since I was a child, over 40 years ago, and I don't know how much before that, and they are still around today).

*

Offline techmind

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • 934
  • Un-obfuscated
    • View Profile
    • techmind.org
Electric vehicles.
« Reply #4 on: 09/12/2007 20:38:06 »
But with electric vehicles you still have to charge them up, and (unless you really believe 100% renewable energy is a reality any time soon) you've simply moved the pollution elsewhere - not eliminated it. Sure, car engines aren't that efficient... but neither is electricity generation in thermal power stations.
One good advantage of electric cars for about-town (stop-start) journeys is that you can use regenerative braking to reclaim the kinetic energy when you have to brake, rather than merely dumping it as heat in the brake-pads/discs. (In normal braking of a typical car from 30mph to rest, you dissipate enough energy to boil a mug of water from each wheel.)
"It has been said that the primary function of schools is to impart enough facts to make children stop asking questions. Some, with whom the schools do not succeed, become scientists." - Schmidt-Nielsen "Memoirs of a curious scientist"