why don't bread crumbs go mouldy?

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paul.fr

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why don't bread crumbs go mouldy?
« on: 18/01/2008 22:44:50 »
If i leave a slice of bread in the bread bin, quite quickly it will begin to go mouldy. Yet there are crumbs in there that are...lets say...older than the bread, they show no signs of mould!
why is that?

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Offline Soul Surfer

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why don't bread crumbs go mouldy?
« Reply #1 on: 19/01/2008 00:00:40 »
Breadcrumbs probably dry out too quickly and you need moisture to encourage mould growth
Learn, create, test and tell
evolution rules in all things
God says so!

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Offline JimBob

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why don't bread crumbs go mouldy?
« Reply #2 on: 19/01/2008 02:07:53 »
The cockroaches like to graze on bread mold.

The mind is like a parachute. It works best when open.  -- A. Einstein

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Offline rosalind dna

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why don't bread crumbs go mouldy?
« Reply #3 on: 19/01/2008 11:26:19 »
Probably because the loaf of bread is dense and still has the moisture
(milk & water) that is made with might encourage the mould, whereas
the breadcrumbs are all separated and dry.
Rosalind Franklin was my first cousin and one my life's main regrets is that I never met this brilliant and beautiful lady.
She discovered the Single DNA Helix in 1953, then it was taken by Wilkins without her knowledge or agreeement.

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Offline iko

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why don't bread crumbs go mouldy?
« Reply #4 on: 19/01/2008 14:03:55 »
Probably because the loaf of bread is dense and still has the moisture
(milk & water) that is made with might encourage the mould, whereas
the breadcrumbs are all separated and dry.

Rosalindna is exactly right: mould need moisture to grow.




...from another forum:  http://www.moldbacteria.com/myblog/2005_07_01_moldbacteria_archive.html 
Quote
...
Indoor Mould: Which is the Bread Moulds?

People will normally talk of bread mould. But which mould is the bread. Bread mould could be any of the moulds that commonly occur on bread. Some of the common bread moulds are Rhizopus stolonifer, Chrysonilia sitophila (red bread mould), species of Aspergillus, species of Penicillium, and Monascus ruber. However, any of the indoor moulds can grow on damp bread.

Bread moulds can cause significant losses in bakeries and stores. An outbreak of bread contamination by mould would require careful investigation of the whole bread making and storage processes to identify the source of contamination.

...from THIS forum:
In 1928 Alexander Fleming discovered accidentally that a mould (Penicillium notatum) contaminating left over cultures of bacteria was actually inhibiting bacterial growth. He got published his observation in a scientific journal and almost forgot about it.
Later on two pathologists in London, Florey and Chain, managed after months of hard work and no money (IIWorld War 1939)to grow a little amount of penicillium using large culture containers (fermentators).  Purified penicillin could cure lethal bacterial infection in mice/rats.
Those basic experiments led to further development of penicillin producing techniques and to extraordinary results in human bacterial infections.
After several years the scientist and the two pathologists got the Nobel Prize for Medicine.

http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/courses/mb427/2001/projects/02/antibiotics.htm

PostScriptum: but only A.Fleming will be remembered in History.
(When you find something, publish first...and forget about the rest of the hard work!)

« Last Edit: 19/01/2008 14:10:21 by iko »