Shahriar S. Afshar's Quantum mechanical experiment

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Offline qpan

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What does everyone think about this experiment which apparently disproves the Copenhagen and Many Worlds interpretations of Quantum Mechanics?

Details:
http://www.kathryncramer.com/wblog/archives/000674.html

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Offline McQueen

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Re: Shahriar S. Afshar's Quantum mechanical experiment
« Reply #1 on: 18/08/2004 22:23:22 »
quote:
Originally posted by qpan

What does everyone think about this experiment which apparently disproves the Copenhagen and Many Worlds interpretations of Quantum Mechanics?


I had visited the site , and although I agree in principle with what tha article says , my objection to the experiment is that it is still on the same vague easily disputable plane as othe QM experiments including the double slit experiment. I hope to come up with a more easily verifiable and irrefutable proof , that wave-particle duality is a myth. Also QM has accepted for many years that the concept of empty space does not exist and that an aether of sorts exists at all points in space. This is the constant  interaction of fields resulting in the creation and annihilation of "virtual" electron-positron pairs. Yet when one considers that the energy needed to create a quantum entangled pair under normal circumstances is about 1.5 MeV , it is straining credulity to imagine that energies as small as 10-19eV can result in the same interaction taking place. However an aether of some sort or the other must exist , everyone is coming to the same conclusion. My own feeling is that if an aether of any type exists it has to be a "virtual" photon aether.The existence of such an aether would completely invalidate all such exeriments as the double slit experiment.
« Last Edit: 18/08/2004 22:30:19 by McQueen »
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Offline tweener

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Re: Shahriar S. Afshar's Quantum mechanical experiment
« Reply #2 on: 18/08/2004 23:37:39 »
The article states clearly that the experiment has not been verified.  I'd wait for verification from several reputable scientists before claiming anything has been "proven".

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Offline qpan

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Re: Shahriar S. Afshar's Quantum mechanical experiment
« Reply #3 on: 19/08/2004 09:39:08 »
quote:
Originally posted by McQueen

Quote
Originally posted by qpan

Also QM has accepted for many years that the concept of empty space does not exist and that an aether of sorts exists at all points in space. This is the constant  interaction of fields resulting in the creation and annihilation of "virtual" electron-positron pairs. Yet when one considers that the energy needed to create a quantum entangled pair under normal circumstances is about 1.5 MeV , it is straining credulity to imagine that energies as small as 10-19eV can result in the same interaction taking place.



Surely Hawking radiation is proof that these electron-positron pairs are being created?

What about the Casimir Effect (the small attractive force between two parallel mirrors in a vacuum)? This effect requires the formation and destruction of virtual pairs of particles too doesn't it?

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Offline McQueen

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Re: Shahriar S. Afshar's Quantum mechanical experiment
« Reply #4 on: 19/08/2004 22:37:44 »
quote:
Surely Hawking radiation is proof that these electron-positron pairs are being created?

In this case the energies involvbe are compatible with the forming of quantum pairs.
The casimir force would equally well with a "virtual" photon field , since it is primarily thought to do with EM and photons.
“Sometimes a concept is baffling not because it is profound but because it’s wrong.”