Is there an alternative to glass that doesn't block UV?

  • 5 Replies
  • 6258 Views

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

*

Offline Don_1

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 6890
  • A stupid comment for every occasion.
    • View Profile
    • Knight Light Haulage
Does anyone know of a substitute for glass which does not filter out UV rays?
« Last Edit: 05/09/2008 09:13:17 by chris »
If brains were made of dynamite, I wouldn't have enough to blow my nose.

*

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 2331
  • KIS Keep It Simple
    • View Profile
Re: Is there an alternative to glass that doesn't block UV?
« Reply #1 on: 30/08/2008 12:13:43 »
Check out the quartz crystal used in UV sterilization for Koy Carp and ponds.
Science is continually evolving. Nothing is set in stone. Question everything and everyone. Always consider vested interests as a reason for miss-direction. But most of all explore and find answers that you are comfortable with

*

Offline Don_1

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 6890
  • A stupid comment for every occasion.
    • View Profile
    • Knight Light Haulage
Re: Is there an alternative to glass that doesn't block UV?
« Reply #2 on: 31/08/2008 12:08:50 »
I was really thinking of some sort of polycarbonate or plastic sheeting.

It had occurred to me that a greenhouse with glass will filter out UV rays, and might have a detrimental effect on plants grown in it.

My tortoises enjoy natural sunlight and need UV a & b rays, sitting in a greenhouse in sunny but cold weather conditions would not give them the rays they require, so they have to go under UV lamps. This is costly and environmentally unfriendly. So I thought it might be that commercial growers may use some form or glass substitute in order to give certain plants UV rays that they would ordinarily receive if grown outdoors.

I suppose it asks the question, do plants grown in greenhouses suffer from a lack of UV rays?

Perhaps I should pose this question elsewhere!!!
« Last Edit: 31/08/2008 12:11:14 by Don_1 »
If brains were made of dynamite, I wouldn't have enough to blow my nose.

*

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 8740
    • View Profile
Re: Is there an alternative to glass that doesn't block UV?
« Reply #3 on: 31/08/2008 13:30:54 »
Most plastics, and polycarbonate in particular, will absorb UV better than glass does.
As far as I know plants don't need UV.
Please disregard all previous signatures.

*

Offline RD

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 8171
    • View Profile
Re: Is there an alternative to glass that doesn't block UV?
« Reply #4 on: 31/08/2008 13:48:06 »
UV is generally harmful to plants, but there are exceptions...

Quote
Both plants and phytoplankton vary widely in their sensitivity to UV-B. When over 200 agricultural plants were tested, more than half showed sensitivity to UV-B light. Other plants showed neglible effects or even a small increase in vigor. Even within a species there were marked differences; for example one variety of soybean showed a 16% decrease in growth while another variety of the same soybean showed no effect [R.Parson]. An increase in UV-B could cause a shift in population rather than a large die-off of plants.   
http://www.nas.nasa.gov/About/Education/Ozone/radiation.html
« Last Edit: 31/08/2008 13:57:38 by RD »

*

Offline techmind

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • 934
  • Un-obfuscated
    • View Profile
    • techmind.org
Is there an alternative to glass that doesn't block UV?
« Reply #5 on: 07/09/2008 22:10:02 »
Check out the quartz crystal used in UV sterilization for Koy Carp and ponds.

Quartz is the classic material to use for windows (eg within scientific instruments) which need to pass UV as well as visible wavelengths.
Unfortunately, window-pane sized pieces of quartz-glass sheet are prohibitively expensive (probably 100's of UK pounds).
"It has been said that the primary function of schools is to impart enough facts to make children stop asking questions. Some, with whom the schools do not succeed, become scientists." - Schmidt-Nielsen "Memoirs of a curious scientist"