Can I have MY 34Gig back please?

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paul.fr

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Can I have MY 34Gig back please?
« on: 21/09/2008 18:07:15 »
I have this new external hard drive, it should be 500gig but it is only 466gig! Where is the other 34? Can I have it back?

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Offline LeeE

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Can I have MY 34Gig back please?
« Reply #1 on: 21/09/2008 23:51:17 »
No you can't - it's the overhead for the filesystem you're using.
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Offline Nobody's Confidant

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Can I have MY 34Gig back please?
« Reply #2 on: 22/09/2008 14:21:25 »
If I find it, I'm keeping it. I would kill for 34 Gigs.
Nothing is absolute. It takes a thousand people to make a stereotype, only one to grind it into the dust.

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Offline techmind

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Can I have MY 34Gig back please?
« Reply #3 on: 22/09/2008 21:35:39 »
I have this new external hard drive, it should be 500gig but it is only 466gig! Where is the other 34? Can I have it back?

This is probably the difference between how hard-disk manufacturers calculate their gigabytes (substantially decimal, based on 1000's) and how the OS calculates its gigabytes (substantially binary, (for this question) based on 1024's).

Whenever people discover this for the first time they feel short-changed, but it's just life.

Marketing people over-sell the product because all their competitors are. The OS's calculate in numbers of sectors or larger blocks, each of which are powers of 2 (for computational/storage efficiency / minimum overhead).

I believe there's about 1.073 "manufacturer's gigabytes" to an "OS gigabyte".

This makes sense:
 mnfr GB = 1000x1000x1000 bytes = 1000000000 bytes
 OS GB = 1024x1024x1024 bytes = 1073741824 bytes

This is pretty much the ratio given in the question (500/466 = 1.07296...).

The loss due to filing system (at least on a freshly formatted, empty drive) is pretty minimal.
« Last Edit: 22/09/2008 21:40:27 by techmind »
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paul.fr

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Can I have MY 34Gig back please?
« Reply #4 on: 23/09/2008 17:07:40 »
But I WANT it back!

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Offline Don_1

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Can I have MY 34Gig back please?
« Reply #5 on: 23/09/2008 17:47:09 »
Well you can't have it, can you!

Now go & stand in the corner and say 'I won't be giga greedy any more' 100 times.... Tch!
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paul.fr

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Can I have MY 34Gig back please?
« Reply #6 on: 23/09/2008 21:04:18 »
Can i just say it 66 times and class the others as overhead?

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Offline Nobody's Confidant

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Can I have MY 34Gig back please?
« Reply #7 on: 24/09/2008 14:03:52 »
Funny.
Nothing is absolute. It takes a thousand people to make a stereotype, only one to grind it into the dust.