How thick is the ice covering the surface of Europa?

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Offline Titanscape

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Europa must have a very thick layer of ice since even under the great mass of frozen water the pressure factor which is due to gravity is much less from that little world's gravity. So the ice must be quite thick. Was it 120km or what?

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« Last Edit: 19/06/2008 15:14:25 by chris »
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Offline LeeE

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Re: How thick is the ice covering the surface of Europa?
« Reply #1 on: 18/06/2008 20:56:57 »
Heh, and three years later...

It's uncertain whether Europa is entirely frozen or whether there's liquid water under a frozen outer layer although the current wikipedia article states "Recent magnetic field data from the Galileo orbiter showed that Europa has an induced magnetic field through interaction with Jupiter's, which suggests the presence of a subsurface conductive layer. The layer is likely a salty liquid water ocean." and also "The crust is estimated to have undergone a shift of 80, nearly flipping over (see true polar wander), which would be unlikely if the ice were solidly attached to the mantle."

Full article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europa_%28moon%29
...And its claws are as big as cups, and for some reason it's got a tremendous fear of stamps! And Mrs Doyle was telling me it's got magnets on its tail, so if you're made out of metal it can attach itself to you! And instead of a mouth it's got four arses!

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Offline ukmicky

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How thick is the ice covering the surface of Europa?
« Reply #2 on: 30/06/2008 02:04:00 »
Quote
"The layer is likely a salty liquid water ocean."

Which then begs the question ,where did the liquid layer get its salt from