What Has Happend At This This Beachy Flat Thing ? What Is It ?

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Offline neilep

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Wocha Peeps,

I'm Neil, how are ewe ?

I'm Ok...just getting over a cold !..I do enjoy these chit chats !

Anyway,

see this flat beachy thing ?

[attachment=4989]

What is it ?..why is it ?..how is it ?

ewe see, I just do not know...I want to though !

Ewe can tell me, I'm a qualified sheep !



Thanks


neil
Thinker Of Beachy Flat Things
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Men are the same as women, just inside out !

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Offline JnA

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these?

"The fractures are in three sets, one set runs almost north, another east north east, and a third discontinuous set north north west. These last two sets produce the tiled appearance. The flatness of the pavement is due to initial erosion by waves carrying sand and gravel and nearer to the cliff, to chemical action by sea water. The rocks which absorb sea water during high tide dry out during low tide causing salt crystals to grow and disintegrate the rocks - a process which produces shallow basins'."

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Offline Karen W.

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So do you mean that it is basically forming that ridge , or a shallow basin as in your pictures...???

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline Barrettia

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Hi Neil,

In your first picture, the 'flat thing' is parallel to the strat in the cliffs. So it looks like a resistant bed within a more easily eroded succession (where is the picture from?)

On the seaward edge you can see erosion going on beneath the bed as well.

The fractures are joints, and joints commonly form in two directions due to stresses in the earth. Often two prominent joint sets at about 90 degrees form, as you see in your second photo.

I hope this is useful,

Simon

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Offline neilep

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these?

"The fractures are in three sets, one set runs almost north, another east north east, and a third discontinuous set north north west. These last two sets produce the tiled appearance. The flatness of the pavement is due to initial erosion by waves carrying sand and gravel and nearer to the cliff, to chemical action by sea water. The rocks which absorb sea water during high tide dry out during low tide causing salt crystals to grow and disintegrate the rocks - a process which produces shallow basins'."




Thanks Jna, I can't tell if what ewe have shown is the same as what I have displayed but it looks very close. How fascinating that it's all down to a natural process and not some dodgy builders practicing on the coastline ! [;)]
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Offline neilep

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So do you mean that it is basically forming that ridge , or a shallow basin as in your pictures...???

Hi Karen, sorry Mam, are ewe asking me ?
Men are the same as women, just inside out !

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Offline neilep

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Hi Neil,

In your first picture, the 'flat thing' is parallel to the strat in the cliffs. So it looks like a resistant bed within a more easily eroded succession (where is the picture from?)

On the seaward edge you can see erosion going on beneath the bed as well.

The fractures are joints, and joints commonly form in two directions due to stresses in the earth. Often two prominent joint sets at about 90 degrees form, as you see in your second photo.

I hope this is useful,

Simon

Hey Simon (WELCOME TO THE SITE!  [:)])

I wish I knew where the picture was from. My 12 year old daughter gave it to me on a memory stick that her school provided. She's supposed to identify what it is. I'm NOT doing her homework by the way. I want to know for myself.

Yes, your information is very useful indeed and muchly appreciated !

So, is that what it's called  ?..a Resistant Bed ? It'll be intersted what daughter brat will come up with ! [:D]

Thanks Simon

Neil
Men are the same as women, just inside out !

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Offline Bass

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Hey Simon (WELCOME TO THE SITE!  [:)])

I wish I knew where the picture was from. My 12 year old daughter gave it to me on a memory stick that her school provided. She's supposed to identify what it is. I'm NOT doing her homework by the way. I want to know for myself.

Yes, your information is very useful indeed and muchly appreciated !

So, is that what it's called  ?..a Resistant Bed ? It'll be intersted what daughter brat will come up with ! [:D]

Thanks Simon

Neil


Simon refers to this as a "resistant bed"- we rockers call flat-lying sedimentary layers "beds" (YAWN!!  even the names the soft-rockers use make you want to nap).  For some reason, this particular layer is more resistant to erosion than the surrounding layers of rock (maybe harder sandstone?)- hence it is a "resistant bed"  As the softer beds underneath are eroded by wave action on the seaward side, this layer will collapse and retreat back towards the shore.
Old enough to have a grandson
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Offline JimBob

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Hey Simon (WELCOME TO THE SITE!  [:)])

I wish I knew where the picture was from. My 12 year old daughter gave it to me on a memory stick that her school provided. She's supposed to identify what it is. I'm NOT doing her homework by the way. I want to know for myself.

Yes, your information is very useful indeed and muchly appreciated !

So, is that what it's called  ?..a Resistant Bed ? It'll be intersted what daughter brat will come up with ! [:D]

Thanks Simon

Neil


Simon refers to this as a "resistant bed"- we rockers call flat-lying sedimentary layers "beds" (YAWN!!  even the names the soft-rockers use make you want to nap).  For some reason, this particular layer is more resistant to erosion than the surrounding layers of rock (maybe harder sandstone?)- hence it is a "resistant bed"  As the softer beds underneath are eroded by wave action on the seaward side, this layer will collapse and retreat back towards the shore.

Look, you Wilber, this be could very well be a flat-lying basalt layer that was erupted sub-aerially and then covered by sedimentary rocks. DO you realize that economic value derived from sedimentary rocks far outstrips that of those things you play around with. Why, cement alone brings in more money annually than your minerals. And then there is gypsum, borax, salt, both Na and K salts, and aggregates such as gravel and sand. There is so much more economic value from sedimentary rocks that a fledgling company might just decide that it isn't worth the time and effort to go after stuff from say, oh, ... how about slag. So watch your insults dude or you might bee looking at trees for the rest of your life.

Oh my, I didn't even mention the economic value from oil and gas. How remiss I am. Tisk, tisk.

And did you notice those resistant dike-like things - one at the top of the picture and the other at the bottom of the picture in straight part of the cobble paving the beach after the curve of the inlet?

I will admit it could be limestone but I would place a bet on the basalt rather than limestone.
The mind is like a parachute. It works best when open.  -- A. Einstein

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Offline Barrettia

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Hi all, thanks for a welcome to the site, lots of discussion, and I hope I can be useful,

Ressitamt stratum (OK, layer or bed, whatever you want to use) could be a sandstone or a limestone in a succession of mudstones (or uncemented sandstones).

Although it could be an igneous rock, it appears to be relatively thin. It is therefore not a lava, but could be a sill (i.e. an igneous rock intruded paralell to bedding)

Does anybody guess, or know, where the picture is from?

Simon

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Offline Karen W.

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What Has Happend At This This Beachy Flat Thing ? What Is It ?
« Reply #10 on: 25/10/2008 03:04:25 »
So do you mean that it is basically forming that ridge , or a shallow basin as in your pictures...???

Hi Karen, sorry Mam, are ewe asking me ?

Whoops.. No sorry Kind Sir was referring to JnA's Post....:)

The ride in your picture looks totally different then the one in JnA's.. so I guess I did not see the similarities as you guys do...

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline Karen W.

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What Has Happend At This This Beachy Flat Thing ? What Is It ?
« Reply #11 on: 25/10/2008 03:13:44 »
Hi Neil,

In your first picture, the 'flat thing' is parallel to the strat in the cliffs. So it looks like a resistant bed within a more easily eroded succession (where is the picture from?)

On the seaward edge you can see erosion going on beneath the bed as well.

The fractures are joints, and joints commonly form in two directions due to stresses in the earth. Often two prominent joint sets at about 90 degrees form, as you see in your second photo.

I hope this is useful,

Simon

Welcome Simon! Enjoy the site..

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline JnA

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What Has Happend At This This Beachy Flat Thing ? What Is It ?
« Reply #12 on: 25/10/2008 03:19:34 »
So do you mean that it is basically forming that ridge , or a shallow basin as in your pictures...???

Hi Karen, sorry Mam, are ewe asking me ?

Whoops.. No sorry Kind Sir was referring to JnA's Post....:)

The ride in your picture looks totally different then the one in JnA's.. so I guess I did not see the similarities as you guys do...

Neil's picture looks much like the place where I took my picture (although it's not) ..   another view


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Offline JimBob

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What Has Happend At This This Beachy Flat Thing ? What Is It ?
« Reply #13 on: 26/10/2008 01:50:42 »
Hi all, thanks for a welcome to the site, lots of discussion, and I hope I can be useful,

Ressitamt stratum (OK, layer or bed, whatever you want to use) could be a sandstone or a limestone in a succession of mudstones (or uncemented sandstones).

Although it could be an igneous rock, it appears to be relatively thin. It is therefore not a lava, but could be a sill (i.e. an igneous rock intruded paralell to bedding)

Does anybody guess, or know, where the picture is from?

Simon

I realize this - I was just giving this upstart Bass a bad time. Our discussions sometimes - well, more than sometimes - include remarks made as if this site were really one big field trip and were having a lot of beer and fun. Start insulting people, it will earn you high marks from the rest of us!!
The mind is like a parachute. It works best when open.  -- A. Einstein

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Offline Bass

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What Has Happend At This This Beachy Flat Thing ? What Is It ?
« Reply #14 on: 26/10/2008 01:41:08 »
BELCHHHH!!

(takes another gulp)

Pass the beer nuts, JB.
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Offline neilep

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What Has Happend At This This Beachy Flat Thing ? What Is It ?
« Reply #15 on: 26/10/2008 07:36:44 »
Wocha Peeps,

I'm Neil, how are ewe ?

I'm Ok...just getting over a cold !..I do enjoy these chit chats !

Anyway,

see this flat beachy thing ?

[attachment=4989]

What is it ?..why is it ?..how is it ?

ewe see, I just do not know...I want to though !

Ewe can tell me, I'm a qualified sheep !



Thanks


neil
Thinker Of Beachy Flat Things
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx






THANK EWE ALL for your continued  assistance to this thread.
A quick note to my daughters geography teacher (who, also happens to be my old geography teacher ) reveals this:


  This amazing wave-cut platform is Broad Bench. The photograph is taken from 897791, looking south from the path leading to Tyneham Cap, on the way to Gad Cliff.
     

 

Coasts Kimmeridge Bay Broad Bench Dorset Purbeck Erosion Wave Cut Platform



Erhmm..is this what ewe're all talking about ?

THANK EWE all again !!
Men are the same as women, just inside out !

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Offline JimBob

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What Has Happend At This This Beachy Flat Thing ? What Is It ?
« Reply #16 on: 27/10/2008 00:17:28 »
Then the bench or wave eroded platform is a hard dolomite. - MgCaCO3
The mind is like a parachute. It works best when open.  -- A. Einstein

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Offline JimBob

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What Has Happend At This This Beachy Flat Thing ? What Is It ?
« Reply #17 on: 27/10/2008 00:19:51 »
By the way, Thank you for your latest contribution, Bass. I knew I could count on you to do all the drinking my doctor has forbidden me. I very much appreciate your efforts.

The mind is like a parachute. It works best when open.  -- A. Einstein