How do you think snow helps to form rivers?

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Offline Makiyo781

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How do you think snow helps to form rivers?
« on: 11/04/2005 00:28:39 »
How do you think snow helps to form rivers?
 

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Offline tweener

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Re: How do you think snow helps to form rivers?
« Reply #1 on: 11/04/2005 19:49:26 »
It melts into water, enough of which makes a river.

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Offline Ultima

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Re: How do you think snow helps to form rivers?
« Reply #2 on: 11/04/2005 22:42:53 »
Would glaciers come into this at all?

wOw the world spins?
wOw the world spins?

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Offline tweener

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Re: How do you think snow helps to form rivers?
« Reply #3 on: 18/04/2005 19:09:36 »
If the snow doesn't melt from year to year, then a glacier is formed.  Glaciers also flow, but slowly compared to water.  When they get to a point they melt, then the water runs off into a river (or the sea, depending on where the glacier is located).

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Offline Quantum cat

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Re: How do you think snow helps to form rivers?
« Reply #4 on: 18/04/2005 22:57:58 »
Snow melts, and runs away in the steepest gradientit can find. The water erodes the soil/rock and a deeper higher gradient is formed. eventually so much is eroded is forms a long cavity where all the water goes and voila you have a spring river.
 

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Offline Exodus

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Re: How do you think snow helps to form rivers?
« Reply #5 on: 19/04/2005 10:52:20 »
quote:
Originally posted by Quantum cat

Snow melts, and runs away in the steepest gradientit can find. The water erodes the soil/rock and a deeper higher gradient is formed. eventually so much is eroded is forms a long cavity where all the water goes and voila you have a spring river.



gradient is not the only factor to consider... the hardness of the lithology is also key, easily eroded material will also divert water flow...