What is the greatest observed density?

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Offline itisus

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What is the greatest observed density?
« on: 24/01/2009 01:46:53 »
In theory, the Planck density is the highest possible, about 10^98 g/cm or kg/m or lb/furlong or something like that as I recall.  Has anything with a factor of 100 of that actually been verified by observation?  Of course a Planck black hole would achieve it, but that is only theoretical.  Big black holes and neutron stars are nowhere close.  Particles might -- and are often treated as points -- but I don't think there is actual evidence of it.

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Offline yor_on

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What is the greatest observed density?
« Reply #1 on: 24/01/2009 03:38:24 »
i guess that the nucleus is the densest thing 'observed'.
In particle accelerators you can see the traces of atoms ripped apart.
But that's a guess:)
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Offline Vern

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What is the greatest observed density?
« Reply #2 on: 24/01/2009 14:16:21 »
i guess that the nucleus is the densest thing 'observed'.
In particle accelerators you can see the traces of atoms ripped apart.
But that's a guess:)
I have to agree with yor_on. If you limit it to things actually observed the most dense thing has to be the atomic nucleus.