How do painkillers work?

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Offline DoctorBeaver

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How do painkillers work?
« on: 27/01/2009 23:20:43 »
I've got different kinds of painkillers including co-codamol, voltarol & tramadol. How do they work?
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Offline Chemistry4me

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #1 on: 27/01/2009 23:27:06 »
How do they work?
You mean painkillers in general or the ones that you have mentioned?

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Offline DoctorBeaver

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #2 on: 27/01/2009 23:28:28 »
In general and those I've got.
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Offline Chemistry4me

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #3 on: 27/01/2009 23:34:43 »
At the site of injury, the body produces prostaglandins that increase pain sensitivity. Messages about tissue damage are picked up by receptors and transmitted to the spinal cord via small myelinated fibers and very small unmyelinated fibers. From the spinal cord, the impulses are carried to the brainstem, thalamus, and cerebral cortex and ultimately perceived as pain.

Aspirin, which acts primarily in the periphery, prevents the production of prostaglandins.
Acetaminophen is believed to block pain impulses in the brain itself. Local anesthetics intercept pain signals traveling up the nerve. Opiate drugs, which act primarily in the central nervous system, block the transfer of pain signals from the spinal cord to the brain.

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Offline DoctorBeaver

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #4 on: 27/01/2009 23:36:29 »
Thank you. So which category do co-codamol & voltarol fall into? I know tramadol are opiate-based.
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Offline Chemistry4me

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #5 on: 27/01/2009 23:38:32 »
Quote
Co-codamol (BAN) is a non-proprietary name used to denote a compound analgesic, a combination of codeine phosphate and paracetamol (acetaminophen).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Co-codamol

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Offline DoctorBeaver

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #6 on: 27/01/2009 23:40:14 »
Thank you again
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Offline Chemistry4me

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #7 on: 27/01/2009 23:41:39 »
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Voltarol Emulgel contains Diclofenac: Diclofenac is one of a group of medicines called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics (NSAIDs) which reduce pain and inflammation.
http://www.superliving.co.uk/pharmacy/voltarol-emulgel-50g-p-3.html?Itemid=3&Itemid=3


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Offline Chemistry4me

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #8 on: 27/01/2009 23:43:35 »
Similar to acetaminophen.

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Offline Chemistry4me

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #9 on: 27/01/2009 23:44:22 »
Voltarol Emulgel contains Diclofenac: Diclofenac is one of a group of medicines called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics (NSAIDs) which reduce pain and inflammation.
http://www.superliving.co.uk/pharmacy/voltarol-emulgel-50g-p-3.html?Itemid=3&Itemid=3

Is that the one you are taking?


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Offline Chemistry4me

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #10 on: 27/01/2009 23:56:06 »
Here is a more detailed explaination

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Diclofenac works by blocking the action of a substance in the body called cyclo-oxygenase (COX). Cyclo-oxygenase is involved in the production of various chemicals in the body, some of which are known as prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are produced by the body in response to injury and certain diseases and conditions, and cause pain, swelling and inflammation. Diclofenac blocks the production of these prostaglandins and is therefore effective at reducing inflammation and pain.
http://www.tiscali.co.uk/lifestyle/healthfitness/health_advice/netdoctor/archive/100002791.html


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Offline DoctorBeaver

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #11 on: 28/01/2009 00:24:26 »
My diclofenac is in tablet form. Little orangey-brown thingies.
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Offline OldDragon

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #12 on: 28/01/2009 11:19:41 »
What I find interesting, is that you say both aspirin and volterol/diclofenac block the production of prostaglandins. Why then is aspirin (stated to act primarily in the periphery) more effective as an anti-inflammatory and painkiller for me, than almost ever other medication that I've been prescribed over the years?

I'm also prescribed Tramadol and various other combination drugs, including codeine phosphate, Gabapentin and so on. However, I wonder if conditions that result in chronic pain, being masked by whatever is taken to address that, always has a cause that the body has no ability to heal, and therefore by addressing the pain, the underlying condition progresses because of activities continuing to be undertaken that one would not undertake if in pain, therefore one actually makes some conditions worse and prevent the body's ability to heal itself?



Pain Promotes Growth - Suffering is Optional.

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Offline Chemistry4me

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How do painkillers work?
« Reply #13 on: 28/01/2009 11:24:29 »
Perhaps... I'm not too sure...

However, I wonder if conditions that result in chronic pain, being masked by whatever is taken to address that, always has a cause that the body has no ability to heal, and therefore by addressing the pain, the underlying condition progresses because of activities continuing to be undertaken that one would not undertake if in pain, therefore one actually makes some conditions worse and prevent the body's ability to heal itself?