electronics at speed of light

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Offline erickejah

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electronics at speed of light
« on: 10/04/2009 06:27:15 »
would the electronics still work in a spaceship going at speed of light? and why? [:)]

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Offline lightarrow

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electronics at speed of light
« Reply #1 on: 10/04/2009 11:01:32 »
would the electronics still work in a spaceship going at speed of light? and why? [:)]
1. Yes.
2. For the same reason electronics work at 0 speed (at least, providing the ship is shielded against cosmic particles and radiations).
« Last Edit: 10/04/2009 11:03:08 by lightarrow »

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Offline Bored chemist

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electronics at speed of light
« Reply #2 on: 10/04/2009 17:20:26 »
No, because a ship can't get to the speed of light.
However, for a ship travelling at any speed the electronics would work because, otherwise, you would be able to sit on board the ship and say "The electronics have failed- we must be near C". However, since all velocity is relative there's no way you can judge speed from inside the ship; you need some external reference to measure it against.
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Offline lightarrow

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electronics at speed of light
« Reply #3 on: 10/04/2009 19:47:44 »
Exactly.

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Offline erickejah

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electronics at speed of light
« Reply #4 on: 10/04/2009 20:04:40 »
ok, :) but does not the electron in a cable travels at 2/3 of C?

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Offline LeeE

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electronics at speed of light
« Reply #5 on: 10/04/2009 21:55:26 »
Nope, electrons travel relatively slowly.  An electromagnetic wave can travel down a dielectric cable at up to 2/3rds 'c', but that isn't the same as the electrons moving down the conductor.

Have a look at this short wiki article:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_electricity
...And its claws are as big as cups, and for some reason it's got a tremendous fear of stamps! And Mrs Doyle was telling me it's got magnets on its tail, so if you're made out of metal it can attach itself to you! And instead of a mouth it's got four arses!