What is a Monoblade Helicopter?

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pete soule

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What is a Monoblade Helicopter?
« on: 09/09/2009 10:30:03 »
pete soule asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Monoblade Helicopter

Listening to a naked podcast on a walk-- maybe a month old by the time I get it on my player----

One of the many facest of  my website has the REAL dope on monoblade helicopter

http://www.faiclsocal.info/271/nostalgia/otherindex.htm

Go to the link above and click on "McCutchen" ---US PhDstudent at cambridge - world record for model helicopter -- all in the early 60s!!

check it out
:-))

What do you think?

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Offline Karsten

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What is a Monoblade Helicopter?
« Reply #1 on: 12/09/2009 13:58:00 »
A helicopter with only one blade.
I got annoyed with looking
at my own signature

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Offline Don_1

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What is a Monoblade Helicopter?
« Reply #2 on: 12/09/2009 14:59:25 »
He seems to have been studying the seeds of the Sycamore (Maple).

All very well for a small seed, but for a man made helicopter....... I don't think so.
If brains were made of dynamite, I wouldn't have enough to blow my nose.

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Offline AllenG

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What is a Monoblade Helicopter?
« Reply #3 on: 14/09/2009 23:16:16 »
In model airplane a mono-blade prop was used in the 1930s. Dick Korder was the first to use them to my knowledge.
It was a single blade with a counter balance on the opposite side of the axel.
The thought was that a rotating single blade would cut through cleaner air than a double bladed prop and be more efficient.  My Korder Wakefield model does climb very well so there may be validity to the theory.

Mono-blades have also found applications in motorized sailplanes.  They typically use a retracting prop and a mono-blade being smaller is easier to accommodate in the sailplane's fuselage when stowed during non-powered flight.