how does DNA react in a blood transfusion?

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Offline echochartruse

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how does DNA react in a blood transfusion?
« on: 03/11/2009 00:55:50 »
I would just like to know what happens to DNA when blood is fransfered from one person to another.
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Offline Nizzle

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how does DNA react in a blood transfusion?
« Reply #1 on: 03/11/2009 08:22:05 »
Not much. The DNA isn't swimming around freely in blood. It's packaged within cells (red and white blood cells) and it stays within these cells during a transfusion.

Should a cell rupture during transfusion and should DNA swim around freely in the blood, it would be cleaned up/recycled by phagocytes
« Last Edit: 03/11/2009 08:38:26 by Nizzle »
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Offline Bored chemist

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how does DNA react in a blood transfusion?
« Reply #2 on: 03/11/2009 18:40:56 »
There's not a lot of DNA in red blood cells.
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Offline Nizzle

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how does DNA react in a blood transfusion?
« Reply #3 on: 04/11/2009 09:01:45 »
Oh right -_-

how st00pid of me [:)]
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Offline chris

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how does DNA react in a blood transfusion?
« Reply #4 on: 05/11/2009 02:52:28 »
There's actually very little intact DNA in a blood transfusion; this is because all blood is now leucodepleted; that is, the nucleated white cells are removed (to reduce the risk of prion disease transmission), and the blood is also zapped with ionising radiation to denature any viruses that might be present.

Chris
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