What is the fastest wind?

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Offline GlentoranMark

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What is the fastest wind?
« on: 04/07/2010 15:32:06 »
I want to know all things windy.

What is the fastest wind recorded and can it be beaten?

Is there any sort of a limit that winds can reach?

Where is the windiest place on the planet?

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Offline Geezer

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What is the fastest wind?
« Reply #1 on: 04/07/2010 19:01:48 »
Mount Washington in New Hampshire used to hold the record, but I think it was beaten recently.
There ain'ta no sanity clause, and there ain'ta no centrifugal force Šther.


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Offline Geezer

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What is the fastest wind?
« Reply #3 on: 05/07/2010 09:11:53 »
JimBob has also been known to develop wind that approaches supersonic speeds.
There ain'ta no sanity clause, and there ain'ta no centrifugal force Šther.

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Offline neilep

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What is the fastest wind?
« Reply #4 on: 05/07/2010 10:56:49 »
Baked beans and Bourbon...produces mini hurricanes !
Men are the same as women, just inside out !

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Offline LeeE

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What is the fastest wind?
« Reply #5 on: 06/07/2010 07:40:49 »
In our solar system, storm winds as high as 600 m/s (2,100 km/h) have been recorded on Neptune.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptune

However, it seems that in general, more typical wind speeds are lower, between 20 m/s - 400 m/s (72 km/h - 1440 km/h).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptune#Climate

...And its claws are as big as cups, and for some reason it's got a tremendous fear of stamps! And Mrs Doyle was telling me it's got magnets on its tail, so if you're made out of metal it can attach itself to you! And instead of a mouth it's got four arses!

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Offline GlentoranMark

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What is the fastest wind?
« Reply #6 on: 06/07/2010 21:45:34 »
In our solar system, storm winds as high as 600 m/s (2,100 km/h) have been recorded on Neptune.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptune [nofollow]

However, it seems that in general, more typical wind speeds are lower, between 20 m/s - 400 m/s (72 km/h - 1440 km/h).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptune#Climate [nofollow]



Sorry I didn't phrase the question correct I was of course referring to our planet Earth.

Just as an added Astronomy question, can there be winds on the Sun?

Thanks to all who have responded so far, fascinating stuff.

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Offline tommya300

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What is the fastest wind?
« Reply #7 on: 07/07/2010 09:05:16 »
In our solar system, storm winds as high as 600 m/s (2,100 km/h) have been recorded on Neptune.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptune

However, it seems that in general, more typical wind speeds are lower, between 20 m/s - 400 m/s (72 km/h - 1440 km/h).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptune#Climate



Sorry I didn't phrase the question correct I was of course referring to our planet Earth.

Just as an added Astronomy question, can there be winds on the Sun?

Thanks to all who have responded so far, fascinating stuff.
Does the sun have an atmosphere?
If so would any atmospheric turbulence be considered in a catagory called "wind?"
« Last Edit: 07/07/2010 09:18:43 by tommya300 »

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Offline tommya300

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What is the fastest wind?
« Reply #8 on: 07/07/2010 09:17:14 »
In our solar system, storm winds as high as 600 m/s (2,100 km/h) have been recorded on Neptune.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptune

However, it seems that in general, more typical wind speeds are lower, between 20 m/s - 400 m/s (72 km/h - 1440 km/h).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptune#Climate



"Winds in Saturn's upper atmosphere can reach speeds of 1,800 kilometers (1,118 miles) per hour near its equator. In contrast, the strongest hurricane-force winds on Earth top out at about 396 kilometers (246 miles) per hour. These super-fast winds, combined with heat rising from within the planet's interior, cause the yellow and gold bands visible in Saturn's atmosphere."

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/whycassini/planet.html