How fast will quantum processors be?

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Offline Gabe12321

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« on: 19/10/2010 18:36:28 »
I am doing a project for school and was wondering if anyone knows a equation to find out how much processing power a quantum processor will have. I know that a 30 qbit processor would be 10 terahertz and was wondering out how to find out for less qbits. Any help would be appreciated.

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Offline JP

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« Reply #1 on: 19/10/2010 23:05:08 »
Where do you get the number of 30 qbit = 10 terahertz?  Since they don't exist yet, I thought that the clock speeds would be unknown, and depend on the engineering of the system.  The main advantage, I thought, was that quantum computers could take many less operations to solve certain kinds of problems.

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Offline Geezer

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« Reply #2 on: 20/10/2010 03:04:15 »
As JP points out, they are likely to be very different animals, if they ever show up.

I suspect that anyone who is already trying to compare them with current technology in terms of MegaFlops, MungaFlips, DingleHertz or GiggleWicks knoweth naught of which they speak.
There ain'ta no sanity clause, and there ain'ta no centrifugal force ćther.

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Offline graham.d

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« Reply #3 on: 21/10/2010 16:08:35 »
The superposition of quantum states means that you can have massively parallel computing without the massive mounts of hardware. It is hard to compare such a machine with conventional computing. Quantum computers would be excellent at solving particular types of problems such as huge database searches - really anything that involves a lot of possible routes to just a few potential solutions. Conventional computers have to try each combination of input data sequentially to see if a solution emerges.


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Offline imatfaal

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« Reply #4 on: 21/10/2010 16:40:48 »
To backup Gabe, I think I have seen estimates of quantum computer speed in my reading around p v np and other difficult questions in maths.  I am sure I have seen time comparison estimates for a massively parallel q-computer for non-polynomial time problems as a fraction/function of the linear approach of a x giga-flop semi-conductor super-computer.  I think these are highly suspicious but they are out there.  Will dig out some examples. 

well what I read does turn out to be a bit dodgy "There is a common misconception that quantum computers can solve NP-complete problems in polynomial time. That is not known to be true, and is generally suspected to be false."

But others would disagree and say that NP-cpmplet problems will be solvable in polynomial time by q-computers. "In complexity theory, a famous unsolved problem is whether NP is equal to P or not. In this paper, we discuss this aspect in SAT (satisfiability) problem, and it is shown that SAT can be solved in polynomial time by means of a quantum algorithm if the superposition of two orthogonal vectors |0> and |1> prepared is detected physically." ]

Sorry Guys - I seem to have wandered totally off track

« Last Edit: 21/10/2010 16:51:43 by imatfaal »
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Offline Geezer

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« Reply #5 on: 21/10/2010 17:47:02 »
Sorry Guys - I seem to have wandered totally off track


I don't think so. That's good information.
There ain'ta no sanity clause, and there ain'ta no centrifugal force ćther.