God real or not

  • 617 Replies
  • 235938 Views

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

*

Offline Carolyn

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 3761
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #300 on: 31/08/2006 02:41:41 »
quote:
Originally posted by Non_Believer

Annoyed? So you're telling me you got offended by a harmless post? Seriously. How old do you have to be to not get offended by something on the internet? Which in turn, you don't have to read, but do anyways. How mature of an adult, perhaps? That in itself is a form of ignorance. To get offended by something you don't have to read, but chose to read. Yes, emotional feelings are hard to control on your own, but you still chose to read my post even further, to make yourself even more annoyed. It's like reading a book on opinions, and then throwing it away because it annoyed you and you thought it was garbage of a book but kept on reading it when it still flustered you. It is something stupid to get annoyed over, and let your emotions fluster over something so small.



Actually what annoys me is that you are on a forum where there are people of all different races and beliefs.  People generally get along rather well here.  Instead of trying to understand or accept those differences you choose to call people names and remain argumentative.  Are you not able to have a discussion without being insulting? Somehow I doubt that you can.  Everything you've written is dripping with arrogance and disdain.  One more thing that annoys me is this.  You have the nerve to call people you know nothing about ignorant, when you are proof that the Florida School system has gone to hell in a handbasket.  Print it out, take it to your english teacher and ask him what he thinks.

Carolyn
Carolyn

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #301 on: 31/08/2006 03:11:41 »
quote:
Originally posted by Non_Believer
Maybe this should be handled maturely, lets end this post with a sincere "Goodbye". We all have our opinions, and let it be at that, I don't believe in God, George is more intelligent than I am (maybe because of age and have learned more?), and Carolyn believes in God.

[:)]



Thank you for that.

Without being angry, or trying to be patronising, I would suggest the first thing you should learn is how little anyone (including me) can ever really know, and none of us should ever assume we have, the definitive answer to any question.

The second thing, having realised that, is to have a little tact in how you approach these things (it saves a lot of embarrassment and heartache all around at the end of the day).

Besides that, whether you choose to say goodbye (which, bye the way, actually is a corruption of “God be with ye”) is up to you, but you are more than welcome to stay.

You are right that it takes a brave and honest man to admit when they have made a mistake -and you have my respect for that.



George

*

Offline Carolyn

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 3761
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #302 on: 31/08/2006 03:33:38 »
quote:
And I'm not much like other people, you have proven me wrong in many places (yes, being proved wrong is good for me, lets me learn even more), but still realize, I'm just a teenager with an opinion.


Steven - I sincerely apologise to you. I didn't mean to be so harsh, I was just trying to make a point.  Nothing wrong with making mistakes as long as we learn from them.  Saying that you are just a teenager implies that you aren't, for lack of a better word, valuable.  You are valuable and your opinion matters, whether I agree with you or not.

quote:
My English teacher is an idiot to a major degree, and I have many people who will agree to that. But no I can have a normal discussion without being insulting. I do come off insulting because of how I feel about the ideas of God, religion, and science. Most people can't take something without getting offended. And I can much agree with you on the Florida School System, I have not fully lived this school system, but many others.

I'm pretty sure as an American yourself, you are in the same damn basket of idiots as we're all in. This whole country is full of ignorance, and it drips with it. We know nothing about respect, and I've grown up never getting respect, so I barely give any respect back to anyone who asks for it.

But as this is the internet, I have ALL rights to say what I want, and how I feel about something, wether I get nasty about it or not.


This just made me laugh.  I get the feeling you have a wonderful sense of humor, I just missed it.  Sorry I didn't see it.  I also live in Florida, and have one child in the FL school system, and one that's graduated and is off in college.  It is a challenge making sure my kids don't get behind the 8 ball when it comes to an education in Florida. You mentioned that you went to school outside of Florida too?  Have you had to take that awful FCAT yet?  If so, I hope you did well.  If not, good luck.

Steven - I'm sorry you haven't been shown respect.  I hope that changes for you very soon.

quote:
I'll mistreat the use of the internet, I'll abuse the hell out of it. For my own purpose. You and everyone else on this forum, I can give less care for. Your opinions (some great at that) don't matter to me. No one that I don't know that isn't close to me is just an itch on the arm to me. Forums of this such don't matter, you people don't matter.


Yes, these forums do matter.  I've learned alot here and have made some good friends.  And although I've disagreed and argued with you, you should know that you and your opinion matter.  Hope you stick around and check out some other topics.
quote:

Maybe this should be handled maturely, lets end this post with a sincere "Goodbye". We all have our opinions, and let it be at that, I don't believe in God, George is more intelligent than I am (maybe because of age and have learned more?), and Carolyn believes in God.


Something we can agree on.  George is more intelligent than most of us.

Carolyn



Carolyn

*

Offline Non_Believer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • 21
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #303 on: 31/08/2006 03:34:59 »
Thanks and I will stay here, maybe not posting much though.
 

*

Offline Non_Believer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • 21
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #304 on: 31/08/2006 03:44:08 »
quote:
Originally posted by Carolyn

quote:
And I'm not much like other people, you have proven me wrong in many places (yes, being proved wrong is good for me, lets me learn even more), but still realize, I'm just a teenager with an opinion.


Steven - I sincerely apologise to you. I didn't mean to be so harsh, I was just trying to make a point.  Nothing wrong with making mistakes as long as we learn from them.  Saying that you are just a teenager implies that you aren't, for lack of a better word, valuable.  You are valuable and your opinion matters, whether I agree with you or not.

quote:
My English teacher is an idiot to a major degree, and I have many people who will agree to that. But no I can have a normal discussion without being insulting. I do come off insulting because of how I feel about the ideas of God, religion, and science. Most people can't take something without getting offended. And I can much agree with you on the Florida School System, I have not fully lived this school system, but many others.

I'm pretty sure as an American yourself, you are in the same damn basket of idiots as we're all in. This whole country is full of ignorance, and it drips with it. We know nothing about respect, and I've grown up never getting respect, so I barely give any respect back to anyone who asks for it.

But as this is the internet, I have ALL rights to say what I want, and how I feel about something, wether I get nasty about it or not.


This just made me laugh.  I get the feeling you have a wonderful sense of humor, I just missed it.  Sorry I didn't see it.  I also live in Florida, and have one child in the FL school system, and one that's graduated and is off in college.  It is a challenge making sure my kids don't get behind the 8 ball when it comes to an education in Florida. You mentioned that you went to school outside of Florida too?  Have you had to take that awful FCAT yet?  If so, I hope you did well.  If not, good luck.

Steven - I'm sorry you haven't been shown respect.  I hope that changes for you very soon.

quote:
I'll mistreat the use of the internet, I'll abuse the hell out of it. For my own purpose. You and everyone else on this forum, I can give less care for. Your opinions (some great at that) don't matter to me. No one that I don't know that isn't close to me is just an itch on the arm to me. Forums of this such don't matter, you people don't matter.


Yes, these forums do matter.  I've learned alot here and have made some good friends.  And although I've disagreed and argued with you, you should know that you and your opinion matter.  Hope you stick around and check out some other topics.
quote:

Maybe this should be handled maturely, lets end this post with a sincere "Goodbye". We all have our opinions, and let it be at that, I don't believe in God, George is more intelligent than I am (maybe because of age and have learned more?), and Carolyn believes in God.


Something we can agree on.  George is more intelligent than most of us.

Carolyn







Ugh, the FCAT, I have only one left to take, Science FCAT (I'm in 11th). I've lived in Texas, Missouri, North Carolina, and a native from Georgia. Florida is just about the worst place I have lived (there is probably worse, I just haven't experienced them). Respect with me has always been an issue, as in my beliefs, and just how I am (music and clothing). But the respect is coming around better than what it used to be. But I'll check out the other forums here and all. Gonna go watch some of that mindless TV that is out there, and work on a little homework. Good night.
 

*

Offline Non_Believer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • 21
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #305 on: 31/08/2006 06:59:37 »
Bill Hicks - It Seems So Plausible: http://youtube.com/watch?v=-qmglGWMsdk
« Last Edit: 31/08/2006 07:00:09 by Non_Believer »
 

*

ROBERT

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #306 on: 01/09/2006 16:42:46 »
Perhaps this thread is the correct place for this story, (I have moved it from Chat).

" Medical practices blend health and faith
 

By Rob Stein

Updated: 10:03 a.m. ET Aug. 31, 2006
Sandwiched between a swimming pool store and a spice shop on Lee Highway in Fairfax, the Tepeyac Family Center looks like any other suburban doctor's office. But it isn't.

The practice combines "the best of modern medicine with the healing presence of Jesus Christ," a brochure at the reception desk announces. An image of the Madonna greets every patient. Doctors, nurses and staff gather to pray each day before the first appointments.
 
The center is one of a small but growing number of practices around the country that tailor the care they provide to the religious beliefs of their doctors, shunning birth-control and morning-after pills, IUDs and other contraceptive devices, sterilizations, and abortions, as well as in vitro fertilization. Instead, doctors offer "natural family planning" -- teaching couples to monitor a woman's temperature and other bodily signals to time intercourse.."
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14576677/

« Last Edit: 01/09/2006 16:43:14 by ROBERT »

*

Offline Non_Believer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • 21
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #307 on: 01/09/2006 22:48:18 »
That's odd, because most Christians, and some just God believers (ones who believe, but don't have a religion), don't believe in medical help; but not all obviously.
 

*

Offline Non_Believer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • 21
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #308 on: 02/09/2006 21:59:15 »
It's more like a lot, rather than most.
 

*

Offline cranial_implant

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • 96
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #309 on: 02/09/2006 22:58:24 »
I have to say that I am a non believer too.

My head is not what it used to be.
My head is not what it used to be.

*

ROBERT

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #310 on: 04/09/2006 17:21:18 »
quote:
Originally posted by ROBERT

 
The center is one of a small but growing number of practices around the country
 that tailor the care they provide to the religious beliefs of their doctors

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14576677/




If the practice was Buddhist would it include a veterinarian ? [:)]
« Last Edit: 04/09/2006 17:24:57 by ROBERT »

*

Offline Mjhavok

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 468
    • View Profile
    • http://cantmakeadifference.blogspot.com
Re: God real or not
« Reply #311 on: 05/09/2006 05:47:10 »
Prove I exists mm.

Cogito ergo sum
Steven
_______________________________________________________________
In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

*

Offline Mjhavok

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 468
    • View Profile
    • http://cantmakeadifference.blogspot.com
Re: God real or not
« Reply #312 on: 05/09/2006 05:50:04 »
Solipsism is metaphysical mumbo jumbo. If you take solipsisms into account then you can prove nothing. Hence what is the point. You may aswell be nihilistic.

Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more; it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.
« Last Edit: 05/09/2006 05:52:17 by Mjhavok »
Steven
_______________________________________________________________
In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

*

Offline Titanscape

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • 785
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #313 on: 27/09/2006 15:34:25 »
God is more than real, the source of the space, time and matter and cogniscience of it, cogniscience of self and God. It is formed from and according to Him. We are like cartoons or Trons in God's formation.

God is like a universe of strange dimensions and processes who is much bigger and surrounds the vast space which to him is like a bowl.

Or again the universe is like God's brain fluid, in the space widening from the spinal cord into the brain.

A place of comparative simplicity. Of free wills and their creations within His.

God is the higher reality.

He speaks and we can hear it and all can read the Bible. That is I heard my secret thoughts revealed, and my conscience was cleansed. I was convicted I needed more. I got more, I fell to the ground. My fears were driven away, I drank living water... Things I read about in the Gospel, I experienced.

It makes sense to say reality comes from something, not nowhere or nothing. It comes from God, order and cogniscience, good and evil.





Titanscape
« Last Edit: 27/09/2006 15:41:05 by Titanscape »
Titanscape

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #314 on: 27/09/2006 20:16:24 »
quote:
Originally posted by Mjhavok
Solipsism is metaphysical mumbo jumbo. If you take solipsisms into account then you can prove nothing.



Solipsism is far from mumbo jumbo, but it is a philosophical issue rather than a scientific one.

Ofcourse, if one takes solipsism into account, one can prove nothing beyond one's own conceptual existence (and technically, one can also argue that everything else also conceptually exists, only one cannot prove the physical existence of anything beyond oneself, and while one may reasonably assume one's own physical existence, one cannot prove anything about the nature of that existence).

You are right that taking solipsism into account highlights the limitations of what may be proven absolutely, and thus highlights that no matter what science one tries to perform, one must make some assumptions.  This does not invalidate science, it merely places some limits on science, and limits upon knowledge in any form.



George

*

Offline bostjan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 107
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #315 on: 28/09/2006 08:16:44 »
I think solipsism is such an extreme philosophy, that it attracts a lot of attention.  From a purist's standpoint, however, you must define something as reality in order to even talk about reality clearly, thus solipsism, upon it's assumption that reality cannot be seen nor sensed in any way, leaves reality undefined, and cannot speak clearly of reality, which is the very thing it intends to make us aware of.  Therefore, in my opinion, by this argument, it is useless to any form of science.

God, can be argued along the same lines.  If we define god such that god exists everywhere, yet cannot be sensed, thewn the very idea of god is merely a plaything with no basis on any logical or scientific process.  If you define god in a way that has something to do with logic or science, then there would be some way to find god.  But as long as we are uncertain in our terms of what we are looking for, there will be no means of finding.  In the cases where gods have been defined as something tangible, evidence has always disproved their existence.
 

*

ROBERT

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #316 on: 28/09/2006 17:19:25 »
« Last Edit: 28/09/2006 17:19:49 by ROBERT »

*

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • 20602
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #317 on: 28/09/2006 22:13:17 »
OMG Robert...that's amazing !!..........some bloke never finished his drink !!! [:)]

Men are the same as women, just inside out !
Men are the same as women, just inside out !

*

Offline gecko

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 196
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #318 on: 29/09/2006 02:38:28 »
who is that, ted nugent?
 

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #319 on: 29/09/2006 02:44:54 »
quote:
Originally posted by bostjan
I think solipsism is such an extreme philosophy, that it attracts a lot of attention.  From a purist's standpoint, however, you must define something as reality in order to even talk about reality clearly, thus solipsism, upon it's assumption that reality cannot be seen nor sensed in any way, leaves reality undefined, and cannot speak clearly of reality, which is the very thing it intends to make us aware of.  Therefore, in my opinion, by this argument, it is useless to any form of science.


Solipsism is extreme, but no more so than the concept of infinity, or the infinitesimal – neither can exist in reality, yet are valid ways to explore concepts at the limits.
As you say, any 'reality', as a scientist would understand it, must include assumptions.  What solipsism demonstrates is that it is in fact impossible to have a substantial reality without some arbitrary assumptions.
quote:

God, can be argued along the same lines.  If we define god such that god exists everywhere, yet cannot be sensed, thewn the very idea of god is merely a plaything with no basis on any logical or scientific process.  If you define god in a way that has something to do with logic or science, then there would be some way to find god.  But as long as we are uncertain in our terms of what we are looking for, there will be no means of finding.  In the cases where gods have been defined as something tangible, evidence has always disproved their existence.


There is much of the above I agree with, but not everything.
Science and logic are not the same thing.  One can apply logic to concepts that are not inherently scientific, although the converse is not true, science cannot exist in a context devoid of logic.
It is quite possible to speculate upon the notion of a God that is logical, but I would agree that it is not possible to speculate upon the notion of a God that is consistent with science.
I also agree that most of the modern definitions of God are extremely woolly to say the least, and this does inhibit any proper logical debate about God.



George

*

Offline bostjan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 107
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #320 on: 01/10/2006 07:41:41 »
Sorry to speak frankly, but there is very little logical about god.  He is argued to be every opposing extreme in monotheistic religion as well as pantheistic religions, which cover most modern religions.  I never intended to say that science and logic are the same.  They are tools, which together help us understand nature.  Science without logic existed in early greek and egyptian history.  Logic exists without science.

Solipsism is essentially the philosophical scepticism of science.  I'm taking much liberty to paraphrase it as such, but the belief that what we measure and observe is not to be trusted is the same to me.

The extremism of infinity is absolutely different from how i mean the term to describe a philosophy or rhetoric.  Perhaps 'radical' would be a more fitting term.  The way it claims that we cannot claim anything about the outside world is taking a simple fact that observations are tainted by the observer- to the maximum tangible level.

Ok, back to the logical issues with debating god- a logical implication A implies B may be true if A is false or if both A and B are true - and if the truth of A actually tells you about the truth of B, yet in theological arguments, people often try to use this to prove B, which is unprovable by use of A that is simply true but has nothing to do with B.  I.E.- Look at how beautiful a butterfly is!  The beauty of the butterfly must mean there is a god!  or  The bullet just barely missed me so there must be a god!
 

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #321 on: 01/10/2006 20:53:30 »
quote:
Originally posted by bostjan
Sorry to speak frankly, but there is very little logical about god.  He is argued to be every opposing extreme in monotheistic religion as well as pantheistic religions, which cover most modern religions.


Most people who speak of God are not logicians, and do not attempt to create a logically cohesive view of God.  This does not mean it is not possible to create a logically cohesive philosophy that includes the notion of a God (this does not make the philosophy scientific, but it can nonetheless be logically cohesive).
quote:

Solipsism is essentially the philosophical scepticism of science.  I'm taking much liberty to paraphrase it as such, but the belief that what we measure and observe is not to be trusted is the same to me.
The extremism of infinity is absolutely different from how i mean the term to describe a philosophy or rhetoric.  Perhaps 'radical' would be a more fitting term.  The way it claims that we cannot claim anything about the outside world is taking a simple fact that observations are tainted by the observer- to the maximum tangible level.


I don't disagree with you, but I don't see how it invalidates that extreme.

quote:

Ok, back to the logical issues with debating god- a logical implication A implies B may be true if A is false or if both A and B are true - and if the truth of A actually tells you about the truth of B, yet in theological arguments, people often try to use this to prove B, which is unprovable by use of A that is simply true but has nothing to do with B.  I.E.- Look at how beautiful a butterfly is!  The beauty of the butterfly must mean there is a god!  or  The bullet just barely missed me so there must be a god!


But, again, you are arguing that because some people (even many people) abuse logic in trying to create a view of God, that therefore there cannot be a logical model that includes the concept of God.



George

*

Offline bostjan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 107
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #322 on: 02/10/2006 03:32:41 »
I have yet to see one logical explanation that even comes close to proving the existance of any spirit (non-material) being.  If you define god as 'the supreme being who was creator of the universe and is now ruler of the universe,' then there are plenty of things, in the abstract sence, which would possibly fit the definition, such as gravity, energy, or time, but to say there is some personified creature that rules the universe is really non sequitor, as far as I'm concerned.  It just doesn't make any sense.  Why does there have to be someone ruling the universe?  What exactly do they do to execute this rule?  What exactly does the existance of this person explain?

There does not have to be.  The rules of nature govern the behaviour of the universe.  Nothing.  The existance of god does not explain anything.  As a scientist, I have no interest in theories that raise more unanswerable questions and explain nothing observable.  If I was a philosopher, I would probably be intrigued…
 

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #323 on: 02/10/2006 04:09:55 »
quote:
Originally posted by bostjan
I have yet to see one logical explanation that even comes close to proving the existance of any spirit (non-material) being.



I think you missed what I said.  The issue of proof is another matter.  What I said is that one can develop a logically consistent system that includes a God – this is not to say that in any scientific sense one can 'prove' the existence of God.

I have always said one cannot have a scientific system that includes God.  I am not sure whether one can regard anything that is counter-scientific as provable, in that most people here would regard 'proof' as being something scientific.

quote:

but to say there is some personified creature that rules the universe is really non sequitor, as far as I'm concerned.  It just doesn't make any sense.  Why does there have to be someone ruling the universe?  What exactly do they do to execute this rule?  What exactly does the existance of this person explain?

There does not have to be.  The rules of nature govern the behaviour of the universe.  Nothing.  The existance of god does not explain anything.  As a scientist, I have no interest in theories that raise more unanswerable questions and explain nothing observable.  If I was a philosopher, I would probably be intrigued…



Science deals with certain questions, but only those questions.

There are generally regarded as 5 types of question – who, where, why, what, and how.  Science deals with what and how, and not much else.  For a scientist, or an engineer, this is enough; but it is hopelessly inadequate to a judicial system.  The judicial system is primarily concerned with who; and how, or why, is only needed insofar as it helps show 'who' is responsible, but beyond that, 'how' is not pertinent to the judicial system, and 'why' is only slightly pertinent.  Thus, while science has dismissed the notion of God, since nothing in the concept of religion has much relevance to 'how'; but the judicial system retained the notion of an 'act of God', because that explains 'who', but it does so at the expense of ignoring the 'how' – but as I said, the judiciary is not that concerned with 'how'.

Again, as you say, the anthropomorphism surrounding the notion of God is arbitrary, but again, since the notion of God does not try to explain 'how', or even 'what'; thus it is rather arbitrary what God may or may not be.

I know that the above is inherently unscientific, because science can never ignore 'how'; but I always said that God can never fit into the scientific model.  All I said is that there are models where God can perform a valid logical function.



George

*

Offline tony6789

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 1127
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #324 on: 03/10/2006 21:23:09 »
this topic is still going?! jeez

NEVER! underestimate youth
LCPL Hart USMC 6400 I Level Avionics

*

Offline bostjan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 107
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #325 on: 04/10/2006 05:42:00 »
I always thought engineers were curious about how things worked and physicists in why they worked, but this is immaterial.

What logical model relies on the existance of god?
 

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #326 on: 04/10/2006 12:01:10 »
quote:
Originally posted by roarer
I tell you...I ONLY use the words "soul mode" and "body mode" NOT  because I am religious..but because there are NO other words I can think of to distinguish between the two. I suppose I can define those "states"..is that the right word?.....like "death"...and "life"..or something similiar. But I bet that even if I used these words....they would be challenged.
Now to the defintion of death. What does medical science define the state where the heart stops and the brain is starved of oxygen..if it is NOT death? Is there a medical or scientific definition of this and if so what is it called?



OK, let us get back to a more mechanistic, and less semantic, view of this.

The human being is essentially composed of information – the information within the DNA, and the information within the brain.

In theory, the DNA can survive in a dormant state for quite long periods of time (although not for eternity).  Whether a person reconstructed from dormant DNA is still the same person is debatable, and comes down to the question whether two identical twins are really two people or one person (in normal usage they would be regarded as two separate people, and thus it implies that the reconstruction of a human being from dormant DNA does not amount to the reconstruction of the same person, but of a clone that, while sharing the same DNA, is a separate life to the person who may have 'died').

That leaves the information within the brain.  Clearly, like the DNA, so too, information will (at least partially) remain in the brain even as the brain is starved of the means to live.  The functioning of the brain is the ability to process the information; just as the functioning of the cells of the body is to process the information stored in the DNA
quote:
Originally posted by bostjan
I always thought engineers were curious about how things worked and physicists in why they worked, but this is immaterial.



Engineers are concerned how to make things work, while physicists are concerned with how things do work.  Neither are concerned with why (i.e. the purpose for) the universe is as it is.  In fact, scientists and engineers are equally disdainful of the very notion of asking 'why').

quote:

What logical model relies on the existance of god?



There are two different aspects of this.

As I indicated above, while the question of 'relies' may be extreme (on can always find other ways of expressing it), but the judicial system finds the notion 'act of God' to be useful within its model.

But, as has been indicated often enough here, 'God' is simply a word, and the difficulty is to associate a precise meaning to it.

One can use the word to define a range of ideas, or equally, if the word is out of favour, one can use a different word to associate with an idea that might previously have been considered as God.  There are many examples of the substantially same idea being rehabilitated by use of a different name because the old name has become socially unacceptable.

As I said, in my view, the main value of the notion of God is to answer the question 'who?' to things that were not the creation or responsibility of humans.  It is a little like when mathematician asks about the square roots of numbers that are not real positive numbers, so they create the notion of 'imaginary numbers', numbers that can have no physical existence, but are useful to answer a question that can be asked, but cannot otherwise be answered.

Ofcourse, where one can say the problems start is when one applies arbitrary attributes to the notion of God that go beyond it's simple purpose.  When one starts trying to imagine physical manifestations of this metaphysical idea (e.g. imagining a human 'son of God'), then it does somewhat stretch the plausibility of the idea.




George
« Last Edit: 04/10/2006 12:05:19 by another_someone »

*

Offline bostjan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 107
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #327 on: 05/10/2006 06:12:07 »
'Act of God' is a phrase with no pure logical motives.

I don't see how we can be in disagreement as to how a word with no specified meaning has anything to do with logic.  Logic is cut and dried.

Logic: "a science that deals with the principles and criteria of validity of inference and demonstration : the science of the formal principles of reasoning," "something that forces a decision apart from or in opposition to reason"

See my point?  From what do you infer or demonstrate the existance of god?  Notice the word 'science in the dictionary definition of 'logic?'
 

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #328 on: 05/10/2006 10:16:39 »
quote:
Originally posted by bostjan
'Act of God' is a phrase with no pure logical motives.



Ofcourse it has a logical meaning.

The role of the judiciary is to attribute blame for a particular misadventure.  If that blame cannot be attributed to any human entity, then it needs some target for that blame, and God is a useful target to attribute blame (or responsibility) for that which cannot be attributed to a human.  In that context, God becomes a generic abstract substitute for a human.

quote:

I don't see how we can be in disagreement as to how a word with no specified meaning has anything to do with logic.  Logic is cut and dried.

Logic: "a science that deals with the principles and criteria of validity of inference and demonstration : the science of the formal principles of reasoning," "something that forces a decision apart from or in opposition to reason"

See my point?  From what do you infer or demonstrate the existance of god?  Notice the word 'science in the dictionary definition of 'logic?'



If you are willing also to accept theology as a science, then maybe so; but it is certainly not a science in the way that I had intended to use the word (i.e. as a study of the physical environment as we perceive it).  Logic is the study of the abstract, not of the physical; hence why I distinguished it from science.  I would accept that logic is a branch of mathematics (or at least that formal logic is such), but while mathematics is a necessary tool of science, I would not regard mathematics to be a component of science in and of itself (although we have have here another issue about whether 'a science' may be different from 'science').



George

*

Offline bostjan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 107
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #329 on: 06/10/2006 08:02:00 »
Mathematics is a branch of science as much as chemistry is.  Physics is also a tool used in chemistry, does that make it not a branch of science?

BTW, physics is the study of the physical environment as we percieve it.  Science is merely the study of the nature of things, including life (biology), the earth (geology), chemicals (chemistry), and numbers (mathematics) and much more.

And there is nothing logical about making up a person to put blame onto for a misadventure.  Just read what you said 'generic substitute for human.'  There is no logic in making a wild assumption to make up for circumstances you cannot explain.  Logic would require starting with something and deducing a result with a sound explaination, not just pulling something out of the blue.

Anyway, I do not see 'God' being endicted for any of these judicial decisions.  Does the court get a priest to take a deposition from the Bible to get 'God's' testimony?  Or do they consult a Rabbi about the Torah?  Perhaps an Imam for the Koran, or get all three together and see how much agreement you get.  As I said, there is no pure logical motive behind the phrase 'Act of God,' it's merely a poorly worded phrase with a vague meaning.
 

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #330 on: 06/10/2006 11:34:56 »
quote:
Originally posted by bostjan
Mathematics is a branch of science as much as chemistry is.  Physics is also a tool used in chemistry, does that make it not a branch of science?



Physics is a different model to chemistry, and although one has the intermediate model of physical chemistry, chemists have long practised chemistry without being concerned by physics.

quote:

BTW, physics is the study of the physical environment as we percieve it.  Science is merely the study of the nature of things, including life (biology), the earth (geology), chemicals (chemistry), and numbers (mathematics) and much more.



Firstly, mathematics is much more than merely the study of numbers.  Number theory is the study of numbers, but there is also set theory, boolean logic, geometry, calculus, and endless other branches of mathematics.

Secondly, mathematics has very little to do with 'things', it is only about ideas and the manipulation of the abstract.  One cannot conceive of experimental mathematics, and one does not seek to verify mathematical theory by observation of the natural world.  Unlike physics, chemistry, or biology; mathematics need only be shown to be internally consistent in order to show correctness, and need not be shown to be consistent with any observation of the external.

As I say, if you are going to regard mathematics as a science, then you should also regard theology as a science (after all, it is an 'ology' – i.e. a branch of knowledge, and if you do not regard correlation with observation as a prerequisite for science, then all knowledge, however far removed from physical observation, must be regarded as equal).

quote:

And there is nothing logical about making up a person to put blame onto for a misadventure.  Just read what you said 'generic substitute for human.'  There is no logic in making a wild assumption to make up for circumstances you cannot explain.  Logic would require starting with something and deducing a result with a sound explaination, not just pulling something out of the blue.



Read what I said.  There is as much logic in inventing a God for situations that cannot be explained otherwise as there is in inventing imaginary numbers for numbers that do not fit into the established order that existed before that invention.

Theoretical science is all about invention of ideas to fill in the gaps in knowledge.  The difference between science and other branches of knowledge is that the theory is then tested against observation (as I said, this is not possible with mathematics, because we do not have observational or experimental branches of mathematics).

No-one can rightly say that string theory and various theories involving 10 or 11 dimensional space are anything but 'wild assumptions' to make up for circumstances that one cannot explain.  At present, they remain wild assumptions until such time as someone can invent an observational experiment that might provide some observational support for these 'wild assumptions'.  That we require these observational experiments is what we regard as 'scientific methodology', and that to me is what distinguishes what I would regard as 'science' from 'mathematics', 'logic', 'philosophy, or 'theology'.

quote:

Anyway, I do not see 'God' being endicted for any of these judicial decisions.  Does the court get a priest to take a deposition from the Bible to get 'God's' testimony?  Or do they consult a Rabbi about the Torah?  Perhaps an Imam for the Koran, or get all three together and see how much agreement you get.  As I said, there is no pure logical motive behind the phrase 'Act of God,' it's merely a poorly worded phrase with a vague meaning.



Historically, papal power was very real.  In historical terms, the courts were answerable to the King, the King (in European terms) was answerable (at least in theory, if not always in practice) to the Pope, who was then in theory answerable to God.  This ofcourse was one of the reasons so many Kings and Princes of Europe so quickly embraced protestantism, because in the protestant model the King was no longer answerable to the Pope.

It is still the case in this country that the Head of State (although one must distinguish between Head of State and source of government) is also the Head of the Church of England, and thus at least nominally (although no longer in reality) the Government does refer to the local church leader, since the nominal source of secular government is also the nominal head of religion.

Certainly, there are laws in Israel that have come about because of consultation within rabbinical authority (the very notion of which day is regarded as the Sabbath, is a secular law that has its origins in religion, and hence the Muslim countries regard Friday as the day of the Sabbath, Israel regards Saturday, and the countries with a Christian history regard Sunday).  The Israeli law of return assumes that people of a Jewish tradition have a right to migrate to Israel where others do not, and while there is debate in Israel about how to define a Jew, there is no question that religious authorities have their part to play in that debate.  In Islamic countries, there is much debate about the role of sharia law.

In all of the above cases, the legal authorities have either referred to religious authorities in order to 'get God's testimony' as you put it.

'Act of God' is by no means a poorly worded phrase, although you may argue that in an increasingly secular society, it is increasingly an anachronistic phrase.

Interestingly, many people still resort to anthropomorphic notions of 'nature' and 'the Environment', as if they were talking about God; so in many ways, the role of God has not really changed, only the name has changed.  When people say something is 'unnatural', it is as if they say it is contrary to God's law (in the world of science, there is no such thing as unnatural, anything that may be observed must be natural, even if it is observed only as an artifice of human endeavour).  When people talk about harming the Environment, or the Environment fighting back at us, these are all anthropomorphic ideas that have no meaning in science.  The very notions of 'good' and 'bad' are in some way religious notions – in science, things merely are as they are, there is no value judgement of 'good' and 'bad'.



George

*

Offline bostjan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 107
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #331 on: 07/10/2006 09:44:22 »
I'll keep this short.

First off, Chemists who ignore the laws of physics will never go anywhere, since a reaction is determined by entropy and energy.

Second, imaginary number have a vast logical motive behind them.  They are well defined and their behaviour is completely predictable.  'God,' on the other hand, is poorly defined and is completely unpredictable.

Third, it is easy and plausible to test theories in mathematics.  Simplest example: 2+2=4, take two rocks and throw them in with two more rocks and count how many rocks there are.  There is no such thing in the field of theology.  Certainly, most of the details of string theory have not been tested at all, but it is a very new theory in comparison with theological theories such as Judaism and Christianity.

Last, I appreciate the long explainations, but have to disagree with many points you make.  I fail to see how there is any reasonable ammount of logic involved in any concept of god, and I still have yet to see any logical deduction using god that makes the least ammount of sense.
 

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #332 on: 07/10/2006 23:56:07 »
quote:
Originally posted by bostjan
First off, Chemists who ignore the laws of physics will never go anywhere, since a reaction is determined by entropy and energy.



This is, strictly speaking, not true.

If you had said that the laws of chemistry must be consistent with the laws of physics, then I would agree with you; but the whole point about chemistry as a separate discipline is that a chemist does not have to carefully calculate the energy of each electron within a hydrogen and chlorine atom in order to work out how the two will react, but rather takes a higher level model that does ignore the low level physics, and simply says that there is a certain amount of energy that is released by a reaction between hydrogen and chlorine.  The chemist uses a different model to the physicist, but since they are both scientists, the two models must be consistent with each other.

quote:

Second, imaginary number have a vast logical motive behind them.  They are well defined and their behaviour is completely predictable.  'God,' on the other hand, is poorly defined and is completely unpredictable.



I do not disagree that God is poorly defined, and more critically, there are many different definitions of God.  What I am saying is that if someone chooses to define God with less ambiguity, then it is quite possible to build a coherent logical model using many possible closely defined concepts of God.

One of the roles of theology is precisely to try and narrow down these ambiguities (just as scientists try and ever more closely narrow down the ambiguities of the observed world).

I accept that in practice, because there is no experimental verification possible with the notion of God, thus religion is substantially polluted with political expediency, but I would also suggest the same is true of Environmentalism.

quote:

Third, it is easy and plausible to test theories in mathematics.  Simplest example: 2+2=4, take two rocks and throw them in with two more rocks and count how many rocks there are.



I would suggest there are many branches of mathematics, such as aspects of set theory, that is anything but easy to prove.  You are confusing mathematics, which is a very broad discipline, with simple arithmetic of real numbers.

In fact, it can be proven that mathematics must be an incomplete discipline

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6del%27s_incompleteness_theorems
quote:

Gödel's first incompleteness theorem is perhaps the most celebrated result in mathematical logic. It states that
    For any consistent formal theory that proves basic arithmetical truths, it is possible to construct an arithmetical statement that is true 1 but not provable in the theory. That is, any theory capable of expressing elementary arithmetic cannot be both consistent and complete.



Gödel's second incompleteness theorem can be stated as follows:
    For any formal theory T including basic arithmetical truths and also certain truths about formal provability, T includes a statement of its own consistency if and only if T is inconsistent.




The above explains why mathematicians keep expanding the field of mathematics, since if mathematics is to remain consistent, then it must always remain incomplete.

You may, interestingly, argue the exact converse with the notion of God – that anyone who proposes God as part of a theory that is complete, must inevitably have a theory that is inconsistent.  If you want a theory of God that is consistent, then it too must remain incomplete.

Set theory is another theory that seeks completeness, and so has some problems with inconsistency:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russells_paradox
quote:

Let M be "the set of all sets that do not contain themselves as members". Formally: A is an element of M if and only if A is not an element of A.

Nothing in the system of Frege's Grundgesetze rules out M being a well-defined set. If M contains itself, M is not a member of M according to the definition. If M does not contain itself, then M has to be a member of M, again by the very definition of M. The statements "M is a member of M" and "M is not a member of M" cannot both be true, thus the contradiction



Another interesting logical variation of the Russell paradox is the Grelling-Nelson paradox:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grelling-Nelson_paradox
quote:

Definition


Define the adjectives "autological" and "heterological" as follows:
  1. An adjective is autological if and only if it describes itself. For example "short" is autological, since the word "short" is short. "Sophisticated" and "pentasyllabic" are also autological.
  2. An adjective is heterological if and only if it does not describe itself. Hence "long" is a heterological word, as is "monosyllabic".

All adjectives, it would seem, must be either autological or heterological, for each adjective either describes itself, or it doesn't. The Grelling-Nelson paradox arises when we consider the adjective "heterological".
To test if the word 'foo' is autological you can ask: Is 'foo' a foo word? If the answer is 'yes', 'foo' is autological. If the answer is 'no', 'foo' is heterological.
Is 'heterological' a heterological word? If the answer is 'yes', 'heterological' is autological (leading to a contradiction). If the answer is 'no', 'heterological' is heterological (again leading to a contradiction).
There is no consistent answer to the question: Is the word "heterological" heterological? On the one hand, if the word "heterological" is heterological, then it does not describe itself. Since the fact of it not describing itself does, in fact, describe it, it is autological, which means it isn't heterological. On the other hand, if the word "heterological" is not heterological, then it must be autological, which means it describes itself, and therefore it must be heterological. Either case leads to the contradiction that the word "heterological" is both heterological and not heterological, which is impossible.

Analysis


The Grelling-Nelson paradox can be translated into Bertrand Russell's famous paradox in the following way: identify each adjective with the set of objects to which that adjective applies. So, for example, the adjective "red" is equated with the set of all red objects. In this way, the adjective "pronounceable" is equated with the set of all pronounceable things, one of which is the word "pronounceable" itself. Thus, an autological word is understood as a set, one of whose elements is the set itself. The question of whether the word "heterological" is heterological becomes the question of whether the set of all sets not containing themselves contains itself as an element.



The only way out of Russell's paradox is by deliberately excluding certain sets, and thus making set theory incomplete.

This question of inconsistency and incompleteness also pertains directly to the issue of any argument against the notion of God.  If the argument against God depends upon the argument that the concept of God is inconsistent with science, then that must assume that science is both consistent and complete.  If science is allowed to be inconsistent, then there can be no contradiction in a concept that is merely inconsistent with science, since science itself is inconsistent.  If science is incomplete, then this allows the concept of God to exist outside of science because of the incompleteness of science.

None of this is to say that one cannot show that a particular concept of God might not be inconsistent with the accepted domain of science, only that one must nonetheless accept that there will always remain certain concepts (and thus certain possible views of God) that while not consistent within science is not contradicted by it.

quote:
Originally posted by bostjan
Certainly, most of the details of string theory have not been tested at all, but it is a very new theory in comparison with theological theories such as Judaism and Christianity.



Truth is not about how old or how new a theory is.  Some theories can take centuries to prove, (no reason why others would not take millennia to prove), while others are proven in days.

In any event, I was deliberately not talking about Judaism or Christianity, only about the abstract notion of God.  Actual implementations of religion are as much about politics as about theology, and I was not trying to argue the absolute truth of the Bible (or even any particular part of it) – I was merely trying to say that it is possible to have a logically consistent theological doctrine, even though such a doctrine must exist outside of science (but, as I have said, being outside of science is not a proof of illogicality).

If you are trying to answer the question whether God, in any particular context, is a logical concept or not; then that is a general question that is much wider than whether Judaism or Christianity accurately describes a logically consistent implementation of a God.  You cannot prove the illogicality of the general merely by proving the illogicality of the specific, unless you can first demonstrate that the specific in fact can be mapped completely on to every possible general case.  Are you wishing to try and pove that the Judao/Christian model of a God can in fact be mapped onto every other conceivable model of God?  I have seen no formal attempt to make such a proof.

quote:

Last, I appreciate the long explainations, but have to disagree with many points you make.  I fail to see how there is any reasonable ammount of logic involved in any concept of god, and I still have yet to see any logical deduction using god that makes the least ammount of sense.



Thinking about set theory, I would try and phrase it so:

If God be the set of all things that do not belong to any known set of things.  This ofcourse leads to issues that if something belongs to God, and if God is a known thing, then such a thing cannot belong to the set known as God – hence God cannot be in the set of known things.

This explains why, as our knowledge of the world increases, so the number of things that do not belong to the a set of known things diminishes, but it can never reach zero (except by violating the consistency of science – back to Gödel's first incompleteness theorem).



George
« Last Edit: 08/10/2006 01:39:11 by another_someone »

*

Offline bostjan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 107
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #333 on: 08/10/2006 01:34:41 »
I'm sorry, but it is true.  Whether you calculate the energy of each electron, which no one does for realistic molecules anyway, mind you, or you measure it with a calorimeter, you are measuring the energy and using thermodynamics, which is a branch of physics.  Even as you use these measurements to predict whether a reaction will go or not, depends on the laws of thermodynamics.  As a double major in chemistry and physics, I could tell you that nearly every branch of chemistry is concerned with the laws of physics.

Arithmetic is a branch of mathematics, I only used the example I did for simplicity.  If I can show one counterexample to the assumption that there are no experimental tests for mathematics, I prove that assumption false.

Claiming to know something in the set of unknown things is, itself, a paradox, so if god is in the set of unknown things, there cannot exist such a thing as theology, as it is the knowledge of an unknown thing.

Surely these are things you cannot disagree with outright.

Mind you, it's nothing against religion, but I stick to the argument that there is little to no logic involved in them.  Explaininig set theory to a person who has taken two courses at the upper undergraduate level in set theory  is going to convince them neither that mathematics is not a science nor that the notion of god is a logically based axiom.
 

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #334 on: 08/10/2006 04:26:52 »
quote:
Originally posted by bostjan
Whether you calculate the energy of each electron, which no one does for realistic molecules anyway, mind you, or you measure it with a calorimeter, you are measuring the energy and using thermodynamics, which is a branch of physics.  Even as you use these measurements to predict whether a reaction will go or not, depends on the laws of thermodynamics.  As a double major in chemistry and physics, I could tell you that nearly every branch of chemistry is concerned with the laws of physics.



That the laws of chemistry can be mapped to the laws of physics, I do not argue with; but they are distinct and different laws - otherwise, why waste time and resources having separate subjects – why not just call them both 'physics'?  The reason why they are different subjects is because they present different models, each model having its own virtues.

quote:

Arithmetic is a branch of mathematics, I only used the example I did for simplicity.  If I can show one counterexample to the assumption that there are no experimental tests for mathematics, I prove that assumption false.



But who has said that “there are no experimental tests for mathematics”?

What you said earlier was “it is easy and plausible to test theories in mathematics”.  I read this to mean that all mathematics is amenable to experimental tests, not merely that some was.  I did not question that some mathematics was amenable to experimental tests, and thus you have not contradicted me by disproving that “there are no experimental tests for mathematics”.

quote:

Claiming to know something in the set of unknown things is, itself, a paradox, so if god is in the set of unknown things, there cannot exist such a thing as theology, as it is the knowledge of an unknown thing.

Surely these are things you cannot disagree with outright.



Knowing about something is not the same as knowing the thing itself.

In any event, I did not require that God belong to set of things that belong to God.

quote:

Explaininig set theory to a person who has taken two courses at the upper undergraduate level in set theory  is going to convince them neither that mathematics is not a science nor that the notion of god is a logically based axiom.



While I accept that I did not know what to level your knowledge of set theory extends to (apparently substantially greater than my own), but then neither was I trying to teach you set theory, merely highlighting certain pertinent aspects of it.  You are totally at liberty to correct any errors I have made, but I hope that my venture into the field was not so deep as to lead me into serious error, merely deep enough to demonstrate my points.



George

*

Offline bostjan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 107
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #335 on: 08/10/2006 09:32:05 »
Ah, but this is all I said in the first place, that physics is a powerful tool for chemistry as is mathematics, and that a good chemist relies on models that do not ignore the laws of physics.

Quote from: George
One cannot conceive of experimental mathematics, and one does not seek to verify mathematical theory by observation of the natural world.

Perhaps I misunderstood this statement?  Much but certainly not all mathematics has been tested.  Any theory of the natural world based on a mathematical model can be used as an example.  If mathematics was not useful in the natural world for experiment and observation, experimental scientists would be wasting their time to learn mathematics, yet it seems they take great pains to understand as much of the subject as they can.  If it were not for the geometries of Minkowski, we could not have the theories of General Relativity, which have been tested observationally many times and hold very consitent.

I suppose we have reached the point where any argument made by either of us will just be taken by the other to reinforce our own positions, so that we remain divided no matter what points are presented here.  My stance that god concepts have little to do with the branch of science known as logic remains firm, and you are unrelenting in the least to acknowledge this stance.  This is precisely why I included a pre-emptive apology in that statement.
 

*

Offline Mjhavok

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 468
    • View Profile
    • http://cantmakeadifference.blogspot.com
Re: God real or not
« Reply #336 on: 11/10/2006 01:27:11 »
Has anyone purchased Richard Dawkins latest book "The God Delusion". He has also started a website (www.richarddawkins.net) which is the RDF (Richard Dawkins Foundation for Science and Reasoning). Very Interesting book and website. You should check it out if you are interested in the topic of this thread

-Steven

_______________________________________________________

Religion is an insult to human dignity. With or without it you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things. But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion.

-Steven Weinberg
Steven
_______________________________________________________________
In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

*

Offline RMorty

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • 17
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #337 on: 18/10/2006 02:33:13 »
quote:
Originally posted by another_someone

quote:
Originally posted by Mjhavok
Solipsism is metaphysical mumbo jumbo. If you take solipsisms into account then you can prove nothing.



Solipsism is far from mumbo jumbo, but it is a philosophical issue rather than a scientific one.

Ofcourse, if one takes solipsism into account, one can prove nothing beyond one's own conceptual existence (and technically, one can also argue that everything else also conceptually exists, only one cannot prove the physical existence of anything beyond oneself, and while one may reasonably assume one's own physical existence, one cannot prove anything about the nature of that existence).

You are right that taking solipsism into account highlights the limitations of what may be proven absolutely, and thus highlights that no matter what science one tries to perform, one must make some assumptions.  This does not invalidate science, it merely places some limits on science, and limits upon knowledge in any form.



George




  Well, I have noticed an annoying re-occurence of this word for about the past page or so of this thread. It is being used to shoot holes in peoples scientific knowledge.  BUT here is what I think. Solipsism is only able to be applied to everything as a whole. But reality only goes as far as each and every one of our perceptions of the world through our senses. So if I say we are on a planet moving through space around a big ball of fire we call the sun and you say "prove it.... but you can't because solipsism means that what you see could be bull**** and you are in your own little world that dosent exist at all its just a figment of your imagination"  in response to that I say that it is possible that maybe there is nothing. No sun, no planet no universe BUT! I see it and THAT is what we define as reality.  Solipsism can only be used if you are looking at reality from the outside in.  

  What I am saying is that maybe it isn't what we perceive, as not being real.  Maybe you would need to look at it as reality not being real, but we still have a reality, so therefore the sun and earth are real.

  This response goes all the way back to the original post made that mentioned Solipsism and was shooting holes in somones opinion.
 

*

Offline RMorty

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • 17
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #338 on: 18/10/2006 02:46:46 »
Something I find sort of funny is the number of different religions, and a lot of them beleive that thier god(s)or the lack thereof, is/are the only god(s).  In that case a lot of people must be wrong! Right?  

  So if only a small group is right does that mean we all go to hell? Even christians that had protestant denominations.  If everyone really thought religion was important they wouldn't get angry with eachother and decide to split off and make thier own modified version of the religion.

Let me use roman catholics as an example.  They were the original christian religion.  After that I beelive it was the Episcopal church that allowed divorce because some king in England wanted a divorce.  After that more protestant religions were made.  In that case does that mean that anyone who isn't a strict roman catholic is going to hell?

  My point being is that it would be silly to say that so many good people are doomed for hell because they dont beleive in the right religion.  Also, there are good people who are athiest etc.  So does that mean that if there is a hell, it will be filled with a ton of cool people who had good morals and led good lives but simply missed a minute detail like confessing thier sins with thier mouth?

  So for all the christians who beleive jews, muslims and homos will all go to hell, guess what! All of the people who beleive in different christian religions better watch out because if God's word is "written in stone" then one group of y'all are right and the rest are screwed eh?

 See, that sounds kinda silly, now dosen't it?
 

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #339 on: 18/10/2006 02:59:58 »
quote:
Originally posted by RMorty
  What I am saying is that maybe it isn't what we perceive, as not being real.  Maybe you would need to look at it as reality not being real, but we still have a reality, so therefore the sun and earth are real.



I am not quite sure I understand what you are saying, or whether it conflicts with anything I have said.

If what you are saying is that we need to define an arbitrary reality as being an arbitrary absolute starting point, I have no problem with this.  All I was trying to say is that you cannot state any reality as being guaranteed to be the only possible reality; but that does not stop you from selecting a reality as something that you choose (out of expediency) as being real (assuming you actually exist [:)]).

You may arbitrarily define a Sun and Moon to be real in order to accord with your perception of them, but this does not mean that you can demonstrate with total certainty that the Sun and Moon are a unique physical reality, only that they provide a pragmatic solution to your perceptions of reality.



George

*

Offline gecko

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 196
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #340 on: 18/10/2006 05:05:08 »
cant we all just come to our senses and realize theres no god?
 
i mean really. knock it off!
 

*

Offline bostjan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 107
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #341 on: 18/10/2006 08:24:05 »
roman catholics were not the 'original' christian religion.  that'd be the twelve disciples.  the coptic christians are much closer than roman catholics to the practices of the disciples.

but yeah, that's a great point!  what if only jehovah's witnesses are right?
 

*

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: God real or not
« Reply #342 on: 18/10/2006 13:11:32 »
quote:
Originally posted by bostjan

roman catholics were not the 'original' christian religion.  that'd be the twelve disciples.  the coptic christians are much closer than roman catholics to the practices of the disciples.

but yeah, that's a great point!  what if only jehovah's witnesses are right?



Technically, the twelve disciples were Jews, not Christians.  Exactly where one draws the historic line between early Christianity and Judaism is difficult.  Clearly, by the time the Roman Empire adopted Christianity (and not Judaism) they were separate, but what the Roman Empire adopted was what we now regard as the Greek Orthodox form of Christianity, but by the time that was adopted there were already many different variants of Christianity (in fact, since there was not prior to Christianity becoming the State religion of the Roman Empire and standardising body for Christianity, there would have been no standard Christianity).



George

*

Offline RMorty

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • 17
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #343 on: 18/10/2006 18:53:31 »
Ah I see, I was taking the solipsism thing as being a way to say that you cant use science to disprove or prove anything because you dont know its real.

 
quote:
However, you have explained you simply meant reality is only what it is toeach of us differently. kinda?  It is a very confusing concept. i got cross eyes reading If what you are saying is that we need to define an arbitrary reality as being an arbitrary absolute starting point, I have no problem with this. All I was trying to say is that you cannot state any reality as being guaranteed to be the only possible reality; but that does not stop you from selecting a reality as something that you choose (out of expediency) as being real (assuming you actually exist ).


I got a little confused, but I now see you meant that as exactly, reality is only as real as it is to each of us.

« Last Edit: 18/10/2006 18:54:30 by RMorty »
 

*

Offline bostjan

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 107
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #344 on: 18/10/2006 19:45:07 »
quote:
Originally posted by another_someone

quote:
Originally posted by bostjan

roman catholics were not the 'original' christian religion.  that'd be the twelve disciples.  the coptic christians are much closer than roman catholics to the practices of the disciples.

but yeah, that's a great point!  what if only jehovah's witnesses are right?



Technically, the twelve disciples were Jews, not Christians.  Exactly where one draws the historic line between early Christianity and Judaism is difficult.  Clearly, by the time the Roman Empire adopted Christianity (and not Judaism) they were separate, but what the Roman Empire adopted was what we now regard as the Greek Orthodox form of Christianity, but by the time that was adopted there were already many different variants of Christianity (in fact, since there was not prior to Christianity becoming the State religion of the Roman Empire and standardising body for Christianity, there would have been no standard Christianity).



George




I have to disagree with two things you said.  Christian means literally 'follower of Christ.'  If you believe Jesus of Nazareth to be the one called 'Christ,' then a) The disciples were the first followers of Christ, because they not only followed him around, but they followed his teachings and b) the start of Christianity was the same as the start of Jesus's teachings.

It is semantical and quite a simple line of thinking.

But yes, of course the disciples were Jews.  If you read my post, I mentioned 'coptics.'  If you do a little research, you will find that the coptic denomination was spread by Jews like St. Mark and Theophilus, but I didn't say they were the first Christians, just that they are closer than Roman Catholics.
 

*

Offline RMorty

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • 17
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #345 on: 29/10/2006 06:36:11 »
Right, but did they follow the same teachings of the original bible. Whatever that may be?  What I mean is, if the 12 dudes and the roman catholics believed the same things, then are they really different at all.

  Also, what do Christians have to say about people living before Christ?  Did they all go to hell for not believing in god?  See that sounds friggin dumb! How can that be explained?
 

*

Offline simeonie

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 351
    • View Profile
    • http://www.simeonie.co.uk
Re: God real or not
« Reply #346 on: 06/11/2006 23:05:01 »
I am a christian myself =D and to be honest i dont know the answer to that question but i can deffo find out  from my pastor or something.
To be honest though perhaps they went to hell? no one deserves to go to heaven, if justice prevailed then everyone would go to hell. But God showed mercry and sent his son so that didnt have to happen.
   As the Bible seems to indicate, some people did go to heaven even before christ like before they died then went up to heaven
   I dont know for sure the answer to ur question and i am myself interested in the answer. I am just thankfull that god gave me a chance to go to heaven
----------------------
MY NAME IS NOT REALLY SIMEONIE IT IS SIMON!!!

*

Offline Mjhavok

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 468
    • View Profile
    • http://cantmakeadifference.blogspot.com
Re: God real or not
« Reply #347 on: 13/11/2006 00:26:34 »
Read "The God Delusion" By Richard Dawkins and "The End of Faith" By Sam Harris.

I think religions cons out weight any pros it may have.

People who say they find it comforting to think they will go to heaven or that when a loved one dies they go to heaven, I can totally understand that they would find comfort in this. That said, just because something is comfortable doesn't make it true. Like Richard Dawkins I care about what is true. If I had cancer I would want to know about it even if it was terminal.

In science we can't yet understand everything, we might never understand the theory of everything. Just because we don't know or can't understand something doesn't mean god did it. That is a cowardly cop out and highly insufficient.

The latest attempt by Intelligent Design and creationist nuts is to try and equate out lack of understanding of quantum mechanics to someone prove god. This is intellectual criminalism in my opinion. Just another snake oil salesman. Morally reprehensible.

My tired is over :-S.

www.richarddawkins.net is a great site for Secular, Humanists, Atheist freethinkers or anyone who feels they are the edge with regards to religion.

I'm not Richards PR agent by the way lol, just a huge fan.

"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful,without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too."
-Douglas Adams

Steven
_______________________________________________________________
In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

*

Offline gecko

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 196
    • View Profile
Re: God real or not
« Reply #348 on: 16/11/2006 21:36:04 »
this is my real advice people, if you think you need moral guidance, read aesops fables. its morals dont contradict each other like the bibles do. no one is ever brutally murdering each other cause a bully in the sky said so.
it has more complicated morals than "dont steal cause god will punish you". in fact, it involves things like not getting tricked, pacing yourself, and not taking advantage of others kindness. it doesnt rely on punishment and bribery to teach lessons.

if youre having trouble with not knowing what to believe; in general terms: study logical fallacies. read each one of them, recognize what is illogical and start to notice these arguments presented in everyday life. i have never heard "proof of god" that didnt involve a logical fallacy. but it is a good thing to have in mind no matter what your stance on god, in regards to what human beings try to convince you of.

i suggest this, because i did it. so after this, after i have learned many complex moral dillemmas and truisms to live my life by, after i know when someone is trying to lie to me or trick me, what can god do for me?
 

*

Offline Mjhavok

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • 468
    • View Profile
    • http://cantmakeadifference.blogspot.com
Re: God real or not
« Reply #349 on: 26/11/2006 17:45:51 »
When Napoleon asked the Mathematician and Astronomer Laplace where God fitted into his model of the universe, the scientist’s answer was: “II ne me faut pas de cette hypothése-la” (I have no use for that hypothesis which you mention).
Steven
_______________________________________________________________
In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.