How does the game operation work?

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Cody

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How does the game operation work?
« on: 20/01/2011 03:30:04 »
Cody asked the Naked Scientists:
   
how does the game "Operation" work?

Cody

What do you think?
« Last Edit: 20/01/2011 03:30:04 by _system »

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Offline Daerana

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How does the game operation work?
« Reply #1 on: 25/01/2011 02:40:06 »
Basically, the game works by creating a simple circuit.  The battery, light, buzzer, metal edges on the body and metal tweezers are connected by wires yet the wires do not go in a full circle.  ie. imagine that each part is like on a chain yet it wont work unless the chain is done up and goes in a full circle.  This is called a complete circuit.  To complete the circuit the metal of the tweezers must touch the metal edge of the body.  This connection works the same as a switch would in a simple circuit such as turning on a light.  When the circuit is complete the light and buzzer turn on from the power in the battery.  However, if the circuit is not complete this can't happen.

Hope this helps.

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Offline RD

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How does the game operation work?
« Reply #2 on: 25/01/2011 07:06:05 »
To complete the circuit the metal of the tweezers must touch the metal edge of the body. 
 This connection works the same as a switch would in a simple circuit such as turning on a light.

It's a long time since I played operation, but isn't there a latch circuit involved:
 even though the metal-metal connection may only be made momentarily the buzzer and light stay on until reset.
 
I may be wrong, like I said it's been a long time.
« Last Edit: 25/01/2011 07:09:35 by RD »

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Offline Geezer

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How does the game operation work?
« Reply #3 on: 25/01/2011 07:29:34 »
I think you are right. Here's a simpler version - 

[diagram=620_0]
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Offline RD

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How does the game operation work?
« Reply #4 on: 25/01/2011 08:03:31 »
A couple of 555 timer circuits would do it : one to make a latch and  one to make a buzzer.


« Last Edit: 25/01/2011 08:08:58 by RD »

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Offline Geezer

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How does the game operation work?
« Reply #5 on: 25/01/2011 18:07:22 »
My "drawing" is a latch
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Offline RD

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How does the game operation work?
« Reply #6 on: 25/01/2011 23:28:45 »
My "drawing" is a latch

The block diagram symbol for a latch is a rectangle: here is the RS latch in the 555 timer IC (coloured) ...

[attachment=13839]


More (rectangular) latch symbols here ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flip-flop_%28electronics%29#Implementation
« Last Edit: 26/01/2011 01:13:24 by RD »

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Offline Bored chemist

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How does the game operation work?
« Reply #7 on: 26/01/2011 06:55:35 »
Geezer's diagram, while spectacularly unclear, is a latch.
Perhaps more importantly, I think that game might have been going longer than the 555.
If so, I wonder what the original electronics were.
« Last Edit: 26/01/2011 06:57:52 by Bored chemist »
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Offline RD

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How does the game operation work?
« Reply #8 on: 26/01/2011 07:07:49 »
I wonder what the original electronics were.

Could be made with a pair of transistors ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Flipflop_by_trexer.png
« Last Edit: 26/01/2011 07:17:27 by RD »

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Offline Geezer

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How does the game operation work?
« Reply #9 on: 26/01/2011 21:22:08 »
Pretty much anything with more than unity gain could be used. That might be a couple of transistors, a relay, or a non-inverting logic buffer.

However, I have a vague recollection that the buzzer sounded for a bit, then shut itself off. If that's true, then a latch won't quite hack it. We'll need a monostable of some sort. That could be done with some sort of resistor/capacitor network to produce a time constant, combined with a couple of transistors, a relay, or a non-inverting logic buffer.

As relays tend to be a lot more expensive than transistors, I'd think it's most likely they used a couple of cheap transistors.
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Offline Geezer

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How does the game operation work?
« Reply #10 on: 27/01/2011 07:47:56 »
With lots more detail.

[attachment=13848]
There ain'ta no sanity clause, and there ain'ta no centrifugal force Šther.