What kind of white banded crystal is this?

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Offline CrystalLight

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What kind of white banded crystal is this?
« on: 06/05/2011 23:19:44 »
I can not for the life of me find this stone anywhere on the Internet. i would like for all of you smart dudes/dudettes to help me. thank you very much in advance


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« Last Edit: 07/05/2011 02:42:29 by CrystalLight »

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Offline RD

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Re: What kind of white banded crystal is this?
« Reply #1 on: 06/05/2011 23:32:48 »
Rose quartz  [?]

[attachment=14554]

                                                                                 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quartz#Rose_quartz
« Last Edit: 06/05/2011 23:35:13 by RD »

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Offline CrystalLight

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Re: What kind of white banded crystal is this?
« Reply #2 on: 07/05/2011 02:10:58 »
Theres no such thing as banded rose quartz to my knowledge

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Offline JimBob

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Re: What kind of white banded crystal is this?
« Reply #3 on: 07/05/2011 02:23:48 »
It is agate. Agate is quartz deposited at low temperature (100-500°F) in layers. The fact that someone put it into a tumbler and smoothed the surface (or that the smoothness may even be natural - wonder of wonders - rules out any softer pinkish hued material. Rose quartz forms at higher temperatures, usually in hydrothermal veins.
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Offline OokieWonderslug

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What kind of white banded crystal is this?
« Reply #4 on: 07/05/2011 03:48:35 »
It is agate. Agate is quartz deposited at low temperature (100-500F) in layers. The fact that someone put it into a tumbler and smoothed the surface (or that the smoothness may even be natural - wonder of wonders - rules out any softer pinkish hued material. Rose quartz forms at higher temperatures, usually in hydrothermal veins.

I used to dig quartz crystals out of a layer of ground in West Virginia. They were crystals and have lots of mud and water inclusions and are a nice smoky brown color. Though many are perfectly clear and double terminated.

 The layer is about two inches thick and is between two layers of sandstone. It never occurred to me that they could be a form of agate.

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Offline CrystalLight

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What kind of white banded crystal is this?
« Reply #5 on: 07/05/2011 05:23:03 »
Thanks for the info guys great help. Also the dark spot you see is dirt

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Offline RD

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What kind of white banded crystal is this?
« Reply #6 on: 07/05/2011 12:38:43 »
Theres no such thing as banded rose quartz to my knowledge

The elephant carving, which is described as rose quartz, has transparent and milky bands ...

[attachment=14556]

Quote
Rose quartz is not popular as a gem it is generally too clouded by impurities to be suitable for that purpose.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quartz#Rose_quartz
« Last Edit: 07/05/2011 12:44:54 by RD »

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Offline Bass

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What kind of white banded crystal is this?
« Reply #7 on: 07/05/2011 17:34:39 »
I used to dig quartz crystals out of a layer of ground in West Virginia. They were crystals and have lots of mud and water inclusions and are a nice smoky brown color. Though many are perfectly clear and double terminated.

 The layer is about two inches thick and is between two layers of sandstone. It never occurred to me that they could be a form of agate.

Agate is cryptocrystalline (extremely fine-grained) quartz.  If you found visible (megascopic) quartz crystals, they didn't form as agate.

I agree with JimBob- the banding looks like agate/opal.
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