Plasma curvature of space time

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Offline jaiii

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Plasma curvature of space time
« on: 28/06/2011 09:41:08 »
Hello.

How is spacetime curved so that when he worked on it:

1st normal neutral matter
2nd plasma.   

Thank

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Offline imatfaal

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Plasma curvature of space time
« Reply #1 on: 28/06/2011 15:27:32 »
Jaii - this is complicated stuff, you need to be a little more precise. 

there are parts of the stress-energy tensor that rely on the electromagnetic tensor - but this is not something we can easily (or at all) calculate.  we tend to calculate curvature in very special and rarified situations that ease the pain of the maths - what is it that you really want to know, it might be something we can help with or it might be something that we cannot tell at this moment!
Thereís no sense in being precise when you donít even know what youíre talking about.  John Von Neumann

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Offline Supercryptid

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Plasma curvature of space time
« Reply #2 on: 28/06/2011 21:55:36 »
I don't think a gas being in a plasma state would affect the way space-time curves much, if it all. I'm not aware of there being any gravitational effects associated with the Sun (which is a giant ball of plasma) that are not associated with the Earth (a ball of mostly neutral matter) that can't be explained purely by size/mass/rotational rate differences between the two.
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Offline Mr. Data

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Plasma curvature of space time
« Reply #3 on: 28/06/2011 23:54:45 »
I don't think a gas being in a plasma state would affect the way space-time curves much, if it all. I'm not aware of there being any gravitational effects associated with the Sun (which is a giant ball of plasma) that are not associated with the Earth (a ball of mostly neutral matter) that can't be explained purely by size/mass/rotational rate differences between the two.

I've read work, a while ago now, that Plasma physics predicts certain phenomenon about the universes curvature quite well. I cannot say much on it, as I have not investigated it to a great degree... but there are many ways for the universe to have begun, which may imply a plasma or a gas, and all that depends on initial conditions of the universe, and any post phenomena.