What would be the consequence of the Earth spinning the other way?

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Offline chris

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If Earth were spinning in the opposite direction, what would be the consequence?

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Offline Ophiolite

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Theories on planetary formation might well be radically different.
Observe; collate; conjecture; analyse; hypothesise; test; validate; theorise. Repeat until complete.

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Offline Nizzle

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Australia would be one of the last countries to celebrate the new year :)
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but this one doesn't

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Offline Ophiolite

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We're not taking this seriously, are we?
Observe; collate; conjecture; analyse; hypothesise; test; validate; theorise. Repeat until complete.

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Offline CZARCAR

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more wobbling?

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Offline Ophiolite

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Why would there be more wobbling? I'm not saying there wouldn't be, but I can't see a mechanism.

I suppose the collision between Theia and the proto-Earth would have been different in character and that might have altered the size and orbit of the resultant moon, which would have imfluenced the degree of stability imparted to the Earth's axial tilt and precession.
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Offline CliffordK

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Your toilet would flush backwards!!!  Kind of like going "Down Under".  [xx(]

There would be a greater progression of hurricanes and cyclones from west to east rather than east to west, so Florida and the Eastern USA would be relatively immune to cyclones, but California and the Western USA would get hammered by them, as well as Spain, Portugal and Europe.

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Offline syhprum

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That is of course assuming the continents would all be as they are now quite possibly they would all be down south.
syhprum

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Offline CZARCAR

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polarity of magnetic poles?

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Offline yor_on

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Most planets spin the same way but Venus and Uranus does not. And I think we've found the same phenomena elsewhere in the universe. And that the swirl in the toilet goes a defined way is only a fairy tale, as far as I know?
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Offline SeanB

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The sun would rise in the west and set in the east, the day length would be different slightly. Aside from that probably nothing much else, though tides would be different, depending if the moon was also rotating in the same direction as it currently is.

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Offline acecharly

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You would not have asked this question as its probable that dinosaurs would still be roaming the world as the asteroid that killed them may not have hit and even so would have made a different entry point, that is if however if there arrival was not also affected by the reverse spin.

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Offline chris

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The sun would rise in the west and set in the east, the day length would be different slightly. Aside from that probably nothing much else, though tides would be different, depending if the moon was also rotating in the same direction as it currently is.

SeanB, why would day-length be different?
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Offline Nizzle

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The sun would rise in the west and set in the east, the day length would be different slightly. Aside from that probably nothing much else, though tides would be different, depending if the moon was also rotating in the same direction as it currently is.

SeanB, why would day-length be different?

Don't get that either. It would only be different if the speed of rotation would change..
Roses are red,
Violets are blue.
Most poems rhyme,
but this one doesn't

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Offline syhprum

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At present the Moon orbits the Earth in the same way that the Earth rotates , if the Earth rotated in the opposite direction the gravitational interaction between the two would increased presumably gradualy slowing the Earths rotation.
syhprum

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Offline CliffordK

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As far as the length of day...
If the earth rotated the same speed...  the length of day would still be slightly different.

As the earth orbits the sun, in one year, we loose one rotation of the earth.

On the other hand, if the earth rotated the opposite way, we would gain a day with every orbit around the sun, so days would be slightly shorter, and the year would be 2 days longer.

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Offline syhprum

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Good thinking, that did not occur to me. Puts me in mind of the Jules Verne story "Around the world in eighty days"
« Last Edit: 27/03/2012 11:22:19 by syhprum »
syhprum