Can rocks get worms?

  • 8 Replies
  • 2928 Views

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

*

Offline CliffordK

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 6321
  • Site Moderator
    • View Profile
Can rocks get worms?
« on: 09/01/2013 22:31:37 »
Can rocks get a case of worms?

[attachment=17388]

[attachment=17390]
« Last Edit: 10/01/2013 01:29:42 by CliffordK »

*

Offline RD

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 8185
    • View Profile
Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #1 on: 10/01/2013 02:26:30 »
Maybe "tubular stalactites" in a previous life.

Quote
A helictite is a speleothem found in limestone caves ... They are usually made of needle-form calcite and aragonite. Forms of helictites have been described in several types: ribbon helictites, saws, rods, butterflies, "hands", curly-fries, and "clumps of worms."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helictite

"Soda Straws" (tubular stalactites) and Helictites ...

http://www.sterling-adventures.co.uk/blog/2012/01/23/were-going-on-a-helictite-hunt/
« Last Edit: 10/01/2013 03:10:41 by RD »

*

Offline OokieWonderslug

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • 93
    • View Profile
Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #2 on: 10/01/2013 02:29:00 »
Sure that is not some really old hamburger?

*

Offline Don_1

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 6890
  • A stupid comment for every occasion.
    • View Profile
    • Knight Light Haulage
Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #3 on: 10/01/2013 11:46:26 »
This picture of a piece of a Martian meteorite caused quite a stir when it was found in 1984.



"Its a worm, a Martian worm!" was the cry of many. But it was later identified as being an inorganic structure.

Ah well, so much for the Martian Worm.
If brains were made of dynamite, I wouldn't have enough to blow my nose.

*

Offline CliffordK

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 6321
  • Site Moderator
    • View Profile
Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #4 on: 10/01/2013 23:25:43 »
I was wondering what would happen if one of the early Martian probes had found a rock like mine, with only the ability to take photos of it, and no ability for further analysis.  Would NASA have built a billion dollar rocket just to retrieve the one rock?

The Martian worm rock, of course, is microscopic.  The first photo above is close to real size.

I'm not sure I would call these Helictites, but they could have been formed by a similar mineral deposit growth process.

*

Offline RD

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 8185
    • View Profile
Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #5 on: 11/01/2013 06:34:54 »
I'm not sure I would call these Helictites, but they could have been formed by a similar mineral deposit growth process.

If it is speleothem it should bubble/dissolve in acid.
[ if you're going to try that do be careful with acid, e.g. wear safety glasses ]
« Last Edit: 11/01/2013 06:40:18 by RD »

*

Offline Lab Rat

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • 54
    • View Profile
Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #6 on: 11/01/2013 14:23:48 »
Do you know what the matrix is that the worm-like structures are in.  I ask this because, due to the color and the amorphous qualities of some of the matrix, perhaps it is a rock, etc. covered in amber?  This could explain why some parts of the rock appear to have been living at one time.  Some of the most notable parts that could be amber I have circled in red.  Please note the similarities between the circled parts and the pictures I have posted.  Any ideas?

2nd picture from: http://www.diamonds1000.com/1017/ [nofollow]
3rd picture from: http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread354128/pg1 [nofollow]
Sorry that the first picture is so small- the file was too large at first.  You may need to use the original for reference.
« Last Edit: 11/01/2013 14:44:23 by Lab Rat »

*

Offline CliffordK

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 6321
  • Site Moderator
    • View Profile
Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #7 on: 11/01/2013 15:46:03 »
We had always called them agates.  Colors are usually translucent yellows and opaque whites.
They are often associated with petrified wood including one that my mother has that is a beautiful cast of petrified wood (I don't have a photo of that one now).

Anyway, I have wondered if it could be Amber instead.  I probably won't burn the above specimen, but I may hunt down a smaller piece and try a flame test.

*

Offline Bill S

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • 1880
    • View Profile
Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #8 on: 18/01/2013 21:09:26 »
I have a specimen of chalcedony that looks exactly like wax that has run down the side of a candle.  If this specimen is rotated through 90 deg. there would be a similarity.
There never was nothing.