Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #100 on: 03/03/2007 22:56:55 »
Hi Zoey,
I don't want to slow down your enthusiasm but...
did you check the recent post about vitamins
and antioxidants by George (another_someone)?
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=6661.0
This is a really tough and delicate issue.

ikod

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #101 on: 04/03/2007 03:13:14 »
No, I hadn't read it, but thanks. Will do! What about your enthusiasm?
Zoey
 

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #102 on: 04/03/2007 05:32:24 »
 I read the report and posted a reply. If you get a copy of the report can you post some of it here? I would like to read it also.
 

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #103 on: 07/03/2007 22:55:51 »
Some conflicting reports from a search on cod liver oil and cancer.  It appears there is interest in researching this issue, but it needs to be cultivated.

  The bad news first. This one shows a potential negative link between cod liver oil use and risk of developing cutaneous malignant melanoma. Some concerns about the results are noted in the abstract.

2: Int J Cancer. 1997 May 16;71(4):600-4.

Diet and risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma: a prospective study of 50,757
Norwegian men and women.

Veierod MB, Thelle DS, Laake P.

Section of Medical Statistics, University of Oslo, Norway.
marit.veierod@basalmed.uio.no

The relationship between dietary habits and subsequent risk of cutaneous
malignant melanoma (CMM) was studied in 25,708 men and 25,049 women aged 16-56
years attending a Norwegian health screening in 1977-1983. Linkage to the Cancer
Registry of Norway and the Central Bureau of Statistics of Norway ensured a
complete follow-up until December 31, 1992. Diet was recorded through a
semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire at the time of screening, and 108
cases of CMM were identified during follow-up. Use of cod liver oil
supplementation and intake of polyunsaturated fat were associated with
significant increased risk and drinking coffee with significant decreased risk
of CMM in women. Adjusting for height, body mass index, body surface area,
education, smoking or occupational or recreational physical activity did not
change the results. No significant association was found between the incidence
of CMM and any of the dietary factors in men. Important aspects are residual
confounding by sun exposure and social class, as well as concern with multiple
comparisons.

Publication Types:
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

PMID: 9178814 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
-------------------------------------------------
Now, something looking a little more positive.
 This review speaks mostly of vitamin D in relation to development of prostate cancer. However, the author also notes growing interest in the potential role of vitamin D in other cancers as well.  The entire review is available at PubMed Central. The link to it follows this quote.

Clin Biochem Rev. 2005 February; 26(1): 21–32.
Copyright © 2005 The Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists Inc.
Vitamin D: A Hormone for All Seasons - How much is enough? Understanding the New Pressures
Howard A Morris*
Hanson Institute, Box 14 Rundle Mall Post Office, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
Corresponding author.

For correspondence: Professor Howard Morris e-mail: howard.morris@imvs.sa.gov.a
*(Professor Morris was the AACB Roman Lecturer for 2004.)

"
An area of particular interest for novel vitamin D activities is the regulation of cell growth and differentiation.  It has been recognised for over 20 years that the addition of 1,25(OH)2D to culture media for cancer cell lines produced a strong inhibition of growth.  Initially studies included breast cancer and other solid tumour cells lines.37 Particular progress has been made with the study of human prostate cancer cell lines as well as normal prostate epithelial tissue and primary prostate cancer cell cultures.  The prostate functions as a vitamin D-target organ in that normal epithelial cells express the VDR and display regulation of numerous genes by 1,25(OH)2D.  A recent complementary DNA microarray analysis of primary human prostatic epithelial cells revealed that 1,25(OH)2D up-regulated at least 38 genes and 9 were significantly down-regulated.38 The highest induction of expression was the gene for the vitamin D catabolic enzyme CYP24.  The expression of similar but not identical genes was observed in primary prostate cancer cultures.  Some of these genes modulate the mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) pathways associated with growth factor signally while others induce apoptosis or reduce cell cycling activity necessary for cell division and replication.

A study of the effect of 1,25(OH)2D on growth of a number of human prostate cancer cell lines indicated varied responses to 1,25(OH)2D with the LNCaP line being most sensitive while the DU145 cell line was unresponsive39 (Figure 5).  Further studies on the expression of the genes that determine vitamin D activity in these cell lines as well as normal prostate epithelial cells and benign prostate hyperplastic cells indicate a gradation of decreasing CYP27B1 activity as prostate epithelial cells move from normal epithelium with the highest activity through benign prostate hyperplastic epithelium with moderate activity to cancer cells with markedly repressed activity (Table 4).  Neither the expression of VDR or CYP24 demonstrates such a relationship with the development of cancer.  It is interesting that when the DU145 cancer cell, which is unresponsive to 1,25(OH)2D was treated with an inhibitor of CYP24 activity, the growth inhibition by 1,25(OH)2D was demonstrated.43 A recent immunohistochemical study of a human prostate cancer series indicated that the CYP27B1 protein was present in a significant number of these specimens.  Their data suggest that the increased expression of CYP24 or some inactivation of the CYP27B1 enzyme may be important mechanisms for reducing 1,25(OH)2D activity in many clinical prostate cancers.44

These findings all suggest that modulation of vitamin D activity through disruption of vitamin D metabolism within prostate cells may play a permissive role in the development of prostate cancer.  There is considerable epidemiological evidence that either decreased sunlight exposure or decreased vitamin D status is associated with increased risk of many cancers including prostate.  In the USA rates of cancer mortality vary inversely with exposure to sunlight (reviewed45).  A study in Finland demonstrated that men with an initial low vitamin D status were at greater risk for earlier onset prostate cancer and tumours were generally more aggressive suggesting vitamin D status may be critical during the earlier stages of prostate cancer development.  These observations have been confirmed in the United Kingdom.  Thus if a low vitamin D status is confirmed to increase the risk of prostate or any cancers, the maintenance of an adequate vitamin D status and assessment of vitamin D levels are very simple procedures that could be adopted at the population level.  Thus clinical laboratory vitamin D testing would further markedly increase.  Such a public health policy will require the identification of the level of vitamin D required to reduce the risk of cancer."
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1240026
 

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #104 on: 10/03/2007 16:55:50 »
Quote
Some conflicting reports from a search on cod liver oil and cancer.  It appears there is interest in researching this issue, but it needs to be cultivated.

  The bad news first. This one shows a potential negative link between cod liver oil use and risk of developing cutaneous malignant melanoma. Some concerns about the results are noted in the abstract.

2: Int J Cancer. 1997 May 16;71(4):600-4.

Diet and risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma: a prospective study of 50,757
Norwegian men and women.

Veierod MB, Thelle DS, Laake P.

Hi Zoey,
I couldn't check the full-text.  Reading the abstract I could not find the sun-exposure history that now seems to be crucial in making the difference: people that experienced several 'burns'  - instead of a proper suntan achieved gradually - take a much higher risk of developing a melanoma in the following decades.
Epidemiological studies seem to have a problem when cod liver oil is concerned.
As a matter of fact, things are much more complex when you get closer...
Here there is an example.


 
Predictors for cod-liver oil supplement use--the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study.

Brustad M,Braaten T, Lund E.
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromso, Norway. magritt.brustad@ism.uit.no

OBJECTIVE: To assess the use of cod-liver oil supplements among Norwegian women and to examine dietary, lifestyle, demographic, and health factors associated with use of this supplement.
DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.
SETTING AND SUBJECTS: The study is based on data from a food frequency questionnaire from 1998 answered by 37,226 women aged 41-55 y, who in 1991/1992 participated in the Norwegian component of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The Norwegian EPIC cohort was based on a random nation-wide sample of Norwegian women.
RESULTS: Cod-liver oil supplement use was reported by 44.7% of the participating women. Subjects with higher education, high physical activity level, and body mass index (BMI) in the normal range were more likely to use cod-liver oil supplements. Consumption did also increase with increased age as well as with increased reported consumption of fruits, vegetables, fatty fish, lean fish, and vitamin D (excluding the vitamin D contribution from cod-liver oil). Energy intake was higher among cod-liver oil users than nonusers. Whole-year daily users of cod-liver oil were also more likely to take other dietary supplements (OR=2.45, 95% CI: 2.28-2.62). Never smokers were more likely to use cod-liver oil supplements than current smokers.
CONCLUSION: Use of cod-liver oil is associated with several sociodemographic factors, self-reported health issues, and intake of fish, fruit, and vegetables. When assessing the relationship between cod-liver oil use and occurrence of chronic diseases potential confounders need to be considered. Cod-liver oil use seemed not to be matched with vitamin D needs. Thus, emphasis on assessing vitamin D status by measuring levels in blood should be investigated further, in particular, among people living in northern latitudes.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jan;58(1):128-36.





     
« Last Edit: 10/03/2007 22:41:54 by iko »

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #105 on: 11/03/2007 03:00:53 »
Considering the view, I wonder if I could find a sponsor to send me there to search for information?
  Wouldn't any study need to consider if the subjects take cod liver oil, vitamin D supplements, as well as determine any participant's vitamin D level?
  I did a quick search on vitamin D deficiency in Norway and it looks like many studies focus on deficiency in immigrant groups, so even that information is taking time to locate. How could study problems related to taking cod liver oil be overcome?
 

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #106 on: 11/03/2007 21:15:15 »
Considering the view, I wonder if I could find a sponsor to send me there to search for information?
  Wouldn't any study need to consider if the subjects take cod liver oil, vitamin D supplements, as well as determine any participant's vitamin D level?
  I did a quick search on vitamin D deficiency in Norway and it looks like many studies focus on deficiency in immigrant groups, so even that information is taking time to locate. How could study problems related to taking cod liver oil be overcome?


It is a bit funny to focus on deficiency in immigrant groups and 'discover' vitamin D deficiency...
They are dark skinned, wear traditional clothes designed to protect you from tropical sunlight, and I am afraid they do not take cod liver oil as nutritional supplement.
We now understand why most people from northern countries are white skinned blondies!
Their skin is probably able to make vitamin D even under moonlight...

ikod



now a bit of light for this topic from "A-Z Anything in Science..."

Phototherapy

from neonatal jaundice to psoriasis,
cutaneous GVHD and vitamin D deficiency...


ikod   [^]
 
« Last Edit: 11/03/2007 21:45:00 by iko »

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #107 on: 11/03/2007 22:34:02 »
I'm glad you put some light on the subject, too much yet remains in the shadows.
  I've been watching vitamin D reports for several years and am skeptical of some of what we are seeing in the media on this subject. The common theme is that migration from an area of adequate sunlight, Asia, Africa, especially, to Europe and North American Countries leads to development of D deficiency. This because dark skinned people require more time in the sunlight to produce adequate levels of D, and they are relocating to areas where they get less exposure or useful exposure than in their native countries.
  I'm wondering if there are other factors here that are not as well recognized or are not recieving as much press coverage. From the volume of headlines the last few years one would have to wonder how any population could have developed and thrived in the tropical climates. One would have to wonder too, how any population ever developed in Europe.
  If a focus of the studies is on a population likely to have high percentages of deficiency it makes good  news as a 'major public health problem."
   Because there would be more extensive news coverage, more of the reading public would become "aware" of deficiency and its symptoms. Their increased level of awareness may prompt them to go to the health food store and purchase vitamin D, whether or not they belong to the group making the news.
  Other deficiencies may also be affecting vitamin D levels, but are not being heavily 'marketed' at this time. These abstracts from PubMed, may shed another ray of light on the subject.
Zoey
1: Am J Clin Nutr. 1992 Sep;56(3):533-6.

Effect of iron on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D
concentrations.

Heldenberg D, Tenenbaum G, Weisman Y.

Department of Pediatrics, Hillel-Yaffe Memorial Hospital, Hadera, Israel.

In 13 of 17 infants (aged 10.5 +/- 4.3; mean +/- SD mo) with iron-deficiency
anemia, the serum 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentration was below the normal
range and in 9 of these 13 the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was below
the normal range despite the fact that these infants received 10 micrograms
vitamin D/d from the age of 1 mo. The infants were treated with intramuscular
iron dextran (Imferon). The iron-dextran treatment increased the hemoglobin and
serum iron concentrations as well as 25-hydroxyvitamin D and
24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentrations. It is known that iron deficiency
impairs fat and vitamin A intestinal absorption. Therefore, it is suggested that
absorption of vitamin D may also be impaired. This may contribute to the
development of vitamin D deficiency. Iron supplementation may have improved the
absorption of vitamin D in the small intestine and hence increased the vitamin D
concentration in the plasma.

PMID: 1503065 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6 Suppl):1725S-9S.  Links
Nutritional rickets: deficiency of vitamin D, calcium, or both?Pettifor JM.
Medical Research Council Mineral Metabolism Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital and the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. pettiforjm@medicine.wits.ac.za

Nutritional rickets remains a public health problem in many countries, despite dramatic declines in the prevalence of the condition in many developed countries since the discoveries of vitamin D and the role of ultraviolet light in prevention. The disease continues to be problematic among infants in many communities, especially among infants who are exclusively breast-fed, infants and children of dark-skinned immigrants living in temperate climates, infants and their mothers in the Middle East, and infants and children in many developing countries in the tropics and subtropics, such as Nigeria, Ethiopia, Yemen, and Bangladesh. Vitamin D deficiency remains the major cause of rickets among young infants in most countries, because breast milk is low in vitamin D and its metabolites and social and religious customs and/or climatic conditions often prevent adequate ultraviolet light exposure. In sunny countries such as Nigeria, South Africa, and Bangladesh, such factors do not apply. Studies indicated that the disease occurs among older toddlers and children and probably is attributable to low dietary calcium intakes, which are characteristic of cereal-based diets with limited variety and little access to dairy products. In such situations, calcium supplements alone result in healing of the bone disease. Studies among Asian children and African American toddlers suggested that low dietary calcium intakes result in increased catabolism of vitamin D and the development of vitamin D deficiency and rickets. Dietary calcium deficiency and vitamin D deficiency represent 2 ends of the spectrum for the pathogenesis of nutritional rickets, with a combination of the 2 in the middle.

PMID: 15585795 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #108 on: 11/03/2007 22:43:06 »
Iko,
  I guess the next obvious step is to look up iron and calcium deficiency among the same immigrant populations showing vitamin D deficiency.
Zoey
 

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #109 on: 11/03/2007 22:45:51 »
Quote
 Because there would be more extensive news coverage, more of the reading public would become "aware" of deficiency and its symptoms. Their increased level of awareness may prompt them to go to the health food store and purchase vitamin D, whether or not they belong to the group making the news.

I don't think these news come out for commercial reasons.
Vitamins are cheap and immigrants are poor:
as usual these facts are ignored by the most...

Did you get this from cod liver oil topic?
A neat study from Switzerland:

Bone and muscle pain in vitamin D deficiency

Short summary from:
G de Torrenté de la Jara, A Pécoud, and B Favrat

Female asylum seekers  with musculoskeletal pain:
 the importance of diagnosis and treatment of hypovitaminosis D.



Hypovitaminosis D is well known in different populations, but may be underdiagnosed in certain populations. We aim to determine the first diagnosis considered, the duration and resolution of symptoms, and the predictors of response to treatment in female asylum seekers suffering from hypovitaminosis D.
In a network comprising an academic primary care centre and nurse practitioners, in 33 female asylum seekers with complaints compatible with osteomalacia, hypovitaminosis D (serum 25-(OH) vitamin D <21 nmol/l) was diagnosed.
The patients received either two doses of 300,000 IU intramuscular cholecalciferol as well as 800 IU of cholecalciferol with 1000 mg of calcium orally, or the oral treatment only.
We recorded the first diagnosis made by the physicians before the correct diagnosis of hypovitaminosis D, the duration of symptoms before diagnosis, the responders and non-responders to treatment, the duration of symptoms after treatment, and the number of medical visits and analgesic drugs prescribed 6 months before and 6 months after diagnosis.
Prior to the discovery of hypovitaminosis D, diagnoses related to somatisation were evoked in 30 patients (90.9%). The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 2.53 years. Twenty-two patients (66.7%) responded completely to treatment; the remaining patients were considered to be non-responders.
After treatment was initiated, the responders' symptoms disappeared completely after 2.84 months. The mean number of emergency medical visits fell from 0.88 six months before diagnosis to 0.39 after. The mean number of analgesic drugs that were prescribed also decreased from 1.67 to 0.85.
Conclusion
Hypovitaminosis D in female asylum seekers may remain undiagnosed, with a prolonged duration of chronic symptoms.
The potential pitfall is a diagnosis of somatisation.
Treatment leads to a rapid resolution of symptoms, a reduction in the use of medical services, and the prescription of analgesic drugs in this vulnerable population.

BMC Fam Pract. 2006 Jan 23;7:4.


Comment:

Cod liver oil instead of vitamin D3 would have sorted the same effect.

It is impressive how much time it takes (1.4-2.8 months) to reach complete resolution of the symptoms: not even all patient responded, but all of them where vitamin D deficient. One patient required seven months of treatment to be free from symptoms.

Intriguing questions:

- How many times is a vitamin D deficiency suspected in an adult complaining bone and muscle pain?

- How many doctors would refer their patients' improvement to a drug injected or prescribed several months before?

- How many patients would take a drug for such a long time in spite of lack of results?

ikod
« Last Edit: 11/03/2007 22:54:28 by iko »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #110 on: 11/03/2007 23:08:39 »
Quote
1: Am J Clin Nutr. 1992 Sep;56(3):533-6.

Effect of iron on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D
concentrations.

Heldenberg D, Tenenbaum G, Weisman Y.

Department of Pediatrics, Hillel-Yaffe Memorial Hospital, Hadera, Israel.

In 13 of 17 infants (aged 10.5 +/- 4.3; mean +/- SD mo) with iron-deficiency
anemia, the serum 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentration was below the normal
range and in 9 of these 13 the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was below
the normal range despite the fact that these infants received 10 micrograms
vitamin D/d from the age of 1 mo. The infants were treated with intramuscular
iron dextran (Imferon). The iron-dextran treatment increased the hemoglobin and
serum iron concentrations as well as 25-hydroxyvitamin D and
24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentrations. It is known that iron deficiency
impairs fat and vitamin A intestinal absorption. Therefore, it is suggested that
absorption of vitamin D may also be impaired. This may contribute to the
development of vitamin D deficiency. Iron supplementation may have improved the
absorption of vitamin D in the small intestine and hence increased the vitamin D
concentration in the plasma.

Thanks dear Zoey!
I think I missed this one in the pile of vitamin D papers.
Restricted to patients who are actually taking supplements
and have a profund iron deficiency at the same time.
It's not the case of leukemia, of course, but it is quite
important in many other conditions...

ikod

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #112 on: 23/03/2007 03:54:32 »
Hey Iko,
 Those are awesome pictures! When you return, there is one question for this topic.
  A while back I mentioned having seen a map indicating in which areas of the planet the soil is zinc depleted. As I recall some of the areas were the same in which a high incindence of vitamin A deficiency and childhood blindness also were documented. At the time I was looking up information on a possible relationship between zinc deficiency and vitamin A deficiency. It seems to me that the map was from an international group monitoring nutrient deficiencies around the world. Do you have any ideas on how I might find this information-and map? It has been several moves and computers since I had this information and my reference is lost. If we can find it, it may add another [thin] thread to this discussion.
Zoey
 

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #113 on: 23/03/2007 04:28:54 »


  If an area providing food is zinc deficient, a seemingly 'good diet' may be less than adequate. From the searching tonight, could there be a link between zinc deficiency, vitamin A, and the development of leukemia?
  At the time I had the map showing areas of soil that was zinc depleted, I was getting a lot of information on Vitamin A from the Sight and Life Organization, which was involved in WHO campaigns to eradicate childhood blindness attributed to vitamin A deficiency. I had seen maps showing areas of the planet where vitamin A deficiency and childhood blindness were common. When the map on zinc deficient soil came up it seemed there might well be a correspondence, between areas of high vitamin A and zinc deficiencies.
 If we locate the map, should we look to see if there is also a correspondence between the rates of leukemia, and the areas where the soil is zinc depleted?
Zoey
Vitamin A: Zinc deficiency is thought to interfere with vitamin A metabolism in several ways: 1) Zinc deficiency results in decreased synthesis of retinol binding ...
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminA/

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-01/ef-rfc010906.php

 Public release date: 9-Jan-2006
[ Print Article | E-mail Article | Close Window ]

Contact: Garazi Andonegi
garazi@elhuyar.com
34-943-363-040
Elhuyar Fundazioa

Retinol for combating leukemia cells
This press release is also available in Spanish.

 

Vitamin A, also known as retinol, is present in milk, liver, egg yolk, butter and other foodstuffs and as carotene in vegetables that have a yellow-orange colour, such as carrots and pumpkins.

This vitamin is accumulated in the liver where it is transformed into retinoid. Given that vitamin A, as such, has no effect on our organism, it is the retinoids that are responsible for the physiological activity of the vitamin.

Retinoids take part in three processes: in cell death, in cell differentiation and in cell proliferation.

Some ten years ago the Department of Cell Biology and Histology at the University of the Basque Country initiated research into how cell death was boosted by means of retinoids. It was thought that this potential could be used in the fight against cancer cells.

Clean and programmed death

Two types of death occur in cells: necrosis and apoptosis. Necrosis defines a pathological death, i.e. a death caused by a lack or deficit within the cell such as lack of oxygen or food.

On the other hand, apoptosis is the pre-programmed death of a cell. A number of cells have to die in order that our organism function correctly: for example, when the feet of a foetus are developed in the womb of a mother, at first the fingers are united by a membrane. This membrane has to disappear and, so, the cells thereof have to die off so that the hands may develop correctly. This cellular death is programmed in the embryo genes and has a concrete function. This is apoptosis.

All cells, in fact, have the necessary information to be able to undergo apoptosis but, of course, not all cells have to die. Both internal and external stimuli are what initiate this mechanism in those cases where it is necessary. Various modulating substances are involved amongst which are the retinoids.

Boosting apoptosis

Amongst these retinoids, researchers from the University of the Basque Country chose retinamide for their investigations. Retinamide is a synthetic retinoid, i.e. our body does not produce this substance naturally.

Natural retinoids are used to treat various diseases (e.g. those of the skin) but they turn out to be quite poisonous in the doses required – they are not well tolerated. This is why synthetic retinoids are created.

Specifically, the University research team analysed the effect of retinamide in certain types of leukemia - lymphoblastic leukemias. Nowadays, samples from the Hospital de Cruces in Bilbao are used in order to get these types of leukemia cells.

Lymphoblastic leukemias are, as their name indicates, a type of leukemia that affects lymphoblasts. Lymphoblasts are large cells, precursors of lymphocytes. Malign lymphoblasts are constantly dividing and they accumulate in the bone marrow impeding the formation of blood cells. In the analyses undertaken in the laboratory, it was seen that 95 % of these malign lymphoblasts died after application of retinamide. But what is the mechanism that really triggers this death?

To explain the process, the researchers analysed the action mechanism of the retinamide at a molecular level. From the analyses it was observed that the retinamide accelerated the oxidative stress within the malign cells and that this stress triggered the mechanisms leading to apoptosis. This death is normally clean and programmed death, and, to this end, a group of enzymes cut the protein inside the cell at certain sites, leading to the death of the cell in question. The death has no effect on healthy adjacent cells, does not result in swelling and the side effects are minimal.

Thus, according to what has been shown, retinamide has great potential to eliminate the lymphoblastic cells without affecting healthy lymphocytes nor the rest of the normal cells.

Made-to-measure treatment

With the molecular action mechanism understood, researchers investigated why retinamide did not affect healthy cells and they discovered other factors to explain the phenomena. So, apart from molecular mechanisms, other factors that affect the efficacy of retinamide could be clearly seen. These and others should be taken into account if a pharmaceutical to combat leukemias based on retinamide is to be marketed.

Moreover, according to the researchers, future treatment will be patient-specific. As is well known, not all patients suffering from the same illness respond in the same way to the same treatment. This is why lines of medical and pharmaceutical research increasingly mention the need to know the genetic characteristics of each patient in order to specify suitable treatment. In the case of retinamide, treatment will also be similarly specific but, before this, the trigger mechanism of the retinamide in the cells has to be known and this research will provide key data to this end.


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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #114 on: 23/03/2007 21:59:13 »
Hi Zoey,
thanks for the vitamin A informations (I put them in my alternative-Favourites files).
Even Zinc deficiency in leukemia is interesting and I remember it has been reported long time ago: 16 citations in PubMed since the early eighties, most impressive data from Turkish docs...
I'll study a bit more this quite complicated thing. It is a REAL puzzle even for docs.
As I told you before, in the case of ALL patients eat so frantically salty foods that any zinc deficiency is probably cured in a few days!
Vitamin A and E combined had been given in the past to leukids even in my hospital (late eighties) and no positive results were reported.
Here we go again: indirect data need confirmation and long term studies if anybody in the field is vaguely interested, but the weak epidemiological evidence from the 'Shanghai report' is there, ready to be used by all of us, scared parents of a leukemia survivor.  It is ready to be applied with no risk and maybe no result, we cannot know.
Later on carnosic acid (rosemary) + vitamin D and vitamin D analogues will come, and maybe sesame seeds flavonoids (sesamin, sesamolin...did you read my posts about it?)
It is late and I have to reply to your Helicobacter connection post!
Take care

ikod
« Last Edit: 24/03/2007 00:19:56 by iko »

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #115 on: 23/03/2007 22:49:50 »
I will go back to read those posts you mention, rosemary, etc. Then we need to look at writing press releases, and letters seeking research contributions for the COL and Leukemia Awareness Campaign.
Zoey
 

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #116 on: 23/03/2007 23:10:04 »
Why do you write COL instead of CLO?
It's another mystery to me!  [;D]
ikod
« Last Edit: 23/03/2007 23:12:11 by iko »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #117 on: 24/03/2007 00:05:52 »
To realize where we are and what could be done,
this cut & paste from Complementary Med. (CLO topic)
may help...vitamindcouncil should be our lighthouse!
We might arrange to join them pretty soon.

For skeptical people searching for 'gold standard' treatments
here is reported a precious annotation by Dr. Cannell from the

http://www.vitamindcouncil.com


Vitamin D Newsletter




This is a periodic newsletter from the Vitamin D Council, a non-profit trying to end the epidemic of vitamin D deficiency.  If you don't want to get the newsletter, please hit reply and let us know.  We don't copyright this newsletter.
Please reproduce it and post it on Internet sites.
Remember, we are a non-profit and rely on donations to publish our newsletter and maintain our website.  Our pathetic finances are open to public inspections.  Send your tax-deductible contributions to:
The Vitamin D Council
9100 San Gregorio Road
Atascadero, CA 93422

Supplement
 
Some of you didn't get the last newsletter.  Here's a link.
Why is athletic performance medically important?  If you think for a minute, you'd realize that athletic performance is the same as physical performance.  What happens when physical performance is impaired?  People fall and break their hips, resulting in death, disability, or nursing home admission.  Many people don't realize how fatal falls can be in the elderly.  In 2003, the CDC reported 13,700 persons over 65 in the USA died from their falls, and 1.8 million ended up in emergency rooms for treatment of nonfatal injuries from falls.  Falls cause the majority of hip fractures, which - if they don't result in death - often result in admission to a nursing home.  That's 13,700 deaths, hundreds of thousands of surgeries, countless nursing home admissions, and tens of billions in health care costs every year from impaired athletic performance.  That's why it matters.
 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Fatalities and injuries from falls among older adults--United States, 1993-2003 and 2001-2005. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2006 Nov 17;55(45):1221-4. Link:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17108890&query_hl=9&itool=pubmed_DocSum
 
The scientific evidence that vitamin D reduces falls in the elderly is quite strong.  Some physicians say they must wait for randomized, placebo controlled, interventional trials, saying they need such "gold standard" evidence before they will act to prevent falls.  Here are four such "gold standard" studies:
 
Bischoff HA, et al. Effects of vitamin D and calcium supplementation on falls: a randomized controlled trial. J Bone Miner Res. 2003 Feb;18(2):343-51.
Dhesi JK, et al.  Vitamin D supplementation improves neuromuscular function in older people who fall. Age Ageing. 2004 Nov;33(6):589-95.
Flicker L, et al.   Should older people in residential care receive vitamin D to prevent falls? Results of a randomized trial. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Nov;53(11):1881-8.
Harwood RH, et al.  A randomised, controlled comparison of different calcium and vitamin D supplementation regimens in elderly women after hip fracture: The Nottingham Neck of Femur (NONOF) Study. Age Ageing. 2004 Jan;33(1):45-51.

Some say they require a meta-analysis of such "gold standard" studies, from a top-flight university, published in a respected journal, proving vitamin D reduces falls.  Here's a meta-analysis from Harvard, published is the Journal of the American Medical Association, showing vitamin D reduces falls:

Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Dawson-Hughes B, Willett WC, Staehelin HB, Bazemore MG, Zee RY, Wong JB. Effect of Vitamin D on falls: a meta-analysis. JAMA. 2004 Apr 28;291(16):1999-2006.
 
Will these "gold standard" studies prompt physicians to act?  Will older patients finally get a vitamin D blood level and appropriate treatment of their vitamin D deficiency?  No, most will not.  I wish physicians acted on scientific studies but they do not, no matter how many people are dying.  Vitamin D scientists conducting such trials are in for a rude surprise.
No matter how good their studies, no matter how well designed or meticulously conducted, no matter how good the journal, practicing physicians will continue to ignore such studies.  Practicing physicians do what they learned in medical school, do what their colleagues do, and do what the drug company salespersons say.  Very few keep abreast of medical research, unless a drug company representative puts that research under their nose.

That's why I wrote about athletic performance.  If you think about it for a minute, you'll realize that falling is a failure of athletic performance.  Anything that improves athletic performance will reduce deaths from falls.

As far as athletic performance in younger people goes, I certainly got some interesting letters.  One guy from Tennessee agreed to list his phone number in case the press wanted to call or come by and watch him do chin-ups.

...

John Jacob Cannell MD
Executive Director 





 
now a more personal note:
...sometimes pets and captive animals get more vitamin D 'attention' than humans!

ikod




The Green Iguana Society

Lighting: Iguanas must have a source of UVA and UVB light! UVA stimulates natural behaviors by providing a component of natural sunlight. UVB is important to iguanas for another reason. Without it, their bodies cannot manufacture vitamin D3 or properly metabolize calcium. Iguanas that are deprived of proper UV lighting suffer from a disease called Metabolic Bone Disease (MBD) which is unfortunately very common in captive iguanas. MBD causes weak bones, jaw and bone deformities and early death.

The absolute best source of UV light is the sun. Allowing your iguana to bask in the sun on a regular basis will provide it with large amounts of natural UV light. The general rule of thumb is - the more real sun your iguana has access to, the better. One thing to be aware of is that glass and plastic filter out the UV components of sunlight. It is for this reason that you cannot just set your iguana in front of a closed window in the sun. The window glass filters out most of the UV light, so your iguana will not benefit from such sunbathing in terms of vitamin D3 production (although he might enjoy this (in)activity immensely).

An additional source of UV light is special fluorescent UV bulbs available in pet stores that sell reptile supplies. Some people feel that if daily doses of real, unfiltered sunlight can be obtained on most days, then the use of artificial UV light bulbs in the iguana's enclosure is not necessary. However, The Green Iguana Society strongly recommends the use of artificial UV in addition to as much basking time in the sun as possible, to ensure that your iguana gets adequate amounts of UV. The effectiveness of real sunlight to stimulate iguanas to produce vitamin D3 varies with the time of year and latitude of your location. Therefore, the additional use of artificial UV lights acts as a safety net - especially in cool, cloudy and/or northern climates. See the Heating, Lighting and Humidity section for specific information on the proper use of UV bulbs in your iguana's enclosure.

from:  http://www.greenigsociety.org/habitatbasics.htm     

 
...What about captive humans?



Vitamin D3

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
« Last Edit: 05/05/2007 09:59:50 by iko »

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #118 on: 24/03/2007 03:41:01 »
I must have been having a dyslexic moment, typing COL :)
Next it is time to reread your posts on this topic and pull the most salient points into an article or proposal when contacting possible supporters for mounting a public awareness campaign and\or initiating further research.
Zoey
 

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #119 on: 28/03/2007 04:55:25 »
 These are two of the companies that turned up in looking for who carries out research on COL. There is more searching to do, but do either or both of these look promising?
Zoey

Seven Seas:
Alternativeley, please email info@sseas.com or write to Seven Seas Ltd, Hedon Road, Hull, HU9 5NJ, England with any queries or feedback you may have regarding the Seven Seas Cod Liver Oil range.

Over the past seven decades Seven Seas has invested heavily in scientific research, health education and the most modern manufacturing processes. Today Seven Seas is the leading health supplement brand not only in the UK and Ireland but in the Middle East, Africa, Caribbean and the Far East.

----------

Lysi: Iceland

http://www.lysi.is/is/english/about%5Fus/

The Company

Lysi Ltd. was established in 1938 by Tryggvi Olafsson and his brother Thordur. General need for vitamins A and D triggered the founding of the company.

Following, Lysi Ltd. became the biggest producer of cod liver oil fulfilling demands from USA. In the years from 1938 - 1950 Lysi Ltd. exported large quantities of it's production to "Up-John Ltd." were vitamins
A and D where extracted from the oil.
Over the past 15 years Lysi Ltd. has held the leadership among companies in the area of research and product development in marine lipids.
The firm collaborates with the University of Iceland and the Icelandic Fisheries Laboratories on a continuous basis.

The link between leadership in research and development on one side and leadership in marketing and sales on the other is an obvious one to the management and owners of Lysi Ltd.

The R&D facilities benefit substantially from a massive reorganization dating back to 1980, when the laboratory and it's function where completely redesigned and a new emphasis was placed on research and development.

Based on this unique setup and the close cooperation with leading international pharmaceutical firms and research organizations, Lysi Ltd. is commonly regarded as one of the world leading know-how centers in the field of marine oils and their utilization.

http://www.lysi.is/is/english/about%5Fus/contacts/

Arnar Halldórsson Research and Development Manager arnar@lysi.is


--------------------




 

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #120 on: 30/03/2007 21:47:13 »
Here is George's reply about engineers and doctors,
the initial comparison/question of this topic:
information spread, despatches, communication of results
in aircraft and medical environments:

George seems too much worried to umbalance a natural condition, but I insist in saying that at the recommended doses it might be only a waste of money at worst.
BTW George, I am still waiting for your comments on the 'Shanghai report' and the engineers versus docs issue...where everything started from, last August.
When you get bored of vitamin intoxication issues, of course.

ikod

That was a long while back – had to search for it – did not even remember whether I had read it at the time or not (may have done, but just forgotten about it).

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=4987.0

It covers a number of issues, but if you want to start with the comparison between the engineering issue and the medical one.  I was going to list all of the differences between the medical profession and the engineering profession that might explain those apparent differences, but then realised that actually, in this context, there is not that much difference between the way the medical profession and the engineering profession react.  The difference rather arises from the nature of the two incidents you report.

The flight safety issue is a negative issue (the engineers are warning what not to do, they are not saying what should be done).  If you look at the usage of drugs today, it is much more difficult to introduce a new drug to the market than it is to have a drug withdrawn from the market as soon as there are any negative side effects found amongst the users of the drug (this is even true for those drugs that have many users who are totally happy with the drug – but fear of litigation from the minority will rapidly cause the drug to be removed from the market).

The aircraft industry is somewhat smaller than the medical industry, so things can happen more rapidly in the aircraft industry than in the medical industry, but it is still the case that getting a new component for an aircraft accepted takes much longer than getting one banned from use.

With regard to the Shanghai report itself (I have only seen the abstract, not the actual report), it provides a wide list of correlations, but as I have often pointed out, correlation does not equate to a causal link (I am not trying to argue against a link between vitamin D and leukaemia, it is merely that the report does not appear to be looking for specific causative agents, only to interesting correlations that would provide directions for future research).  It seems that the report found quite a spectrum of correlations, but the mere breadth of that spectrum would mean that any one single correlation would only be one amongst many.

Clearly, given your own particular interest, the report speaks to you in a particular way; but such a wide (and apparently shallow) report could easily give very different messages to somebody looking for another message to read from it.

Why did the authors not shout louder about the cod liver oil aspect of their report?  It seems to me they were more concerned with looking for environmental risk factors rather than protective factors, and in that context, a protective factor was merely a distraction (although it does seem strange why they even recording something that they were not interested in, unless they were simply trying to discount for it so that they effect did not distort their other results).

One serious problem with cod liver oil is the total collapse of the cod sticks and the cod fishing industry – it is in no position to try to satisfy new and expanding markets for its products.  This, if nothing else, demands that in the long run only a synthetic substitute for cod liver oil could be sustainably sold to an expanding marketplace.
« Last Edit: 31/03/2007 22:32:39 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #121 on: 31/03/2007 00:57:56 »
Thank you so much for your reply!
I think I'm going to copy into the topic,
for the next weeks 'viewers'

Thank you for copying the message here (I should probably have replied here originally, but since I was responding to a post there, I placed the reply there – so I shall now continue the thread here).

Quote
One serious problem with cod liver oil is the total collapse of the cod sticks and the cod fishing industry – it is in no position to try to satisfy new and expanding markets for its products.  This, if nothing else, demands that in the long run only a synthetic substitute for cod liver oil could be sustainably sold to an expanding marketplace.
George

There should be no major problem in the next few years.
Supplying leukemic patients won't do a great change in that market...I wouldn't talk of an expanding market.
Cod liver oil is too cheap and we need small doses: many people are busy trying to prove it is potentially toxic and packed with any pollutant you can imagine.
My doubts about synthetic compounds come from the fact that the so called 'evidence' is for the natural mixture and only an epidemiological one.
Different substances and their complex interactions may be involved.
I hope that some parent finds it through the web. We'll see.
Thanks to this forum.

I understand your concerns that a synthetic product will have to undergo substantial testing for both efficacy and safety, whereas the natural product already has a substantial history we can work with.  The only issue is to what extent will availability of the natural product remain.

Insofar as it is used merely as a treatment, then I would agree that usage will be slight.  I was not clear if you were looking to use it only for treatment, or also as a preventative measure.


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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #122 on: 31/03/2007 13:05:22 »
Quote
Insofar as it is used merely as a treatment, then I would agree that usage will be slight.  I was not clear if you were looking to use it only for treatment, or also as a preventative measure.
George

No preventive measure.
It would not make much sense: the weak unconfirmed evidence would not be enough to support a decision like that and, as you pointed out, maybe there wouldn't be enough cods in the Ocean!
For leukemic patients is different: no precise cause for their disease, just vague hypotheses and lots of the usual 'genetics'.  Of course there are strange genes when some cells seem to go mad, but in selected cases the cause could be 'outside', external, infectious (see the Helicobacter connection).
So there is no apparent cause, and treatment (highly toxic) is 'frozen' in specific protocols that had been empirically established in the last 20years and do work in more than half of the patients (children, for adults it is much tougher).
In this context cod liver oil should be recommended.
Even if you found that kids having orange juice in the morning have a reduced risk of leukemia, and all your data were statistically correct, a dispatch should be immediately sent to all the people concerned, parents, families, even doctors (don't tell them that there is no controlled trial available!). It is a sort of emergency, almost one third of patients have a relapse in the crucial 2-5 years after diagnosis. A relapsed leukemia does NOT respond to further standard treatments, so a more toxic intervention is required.
In relapsed lymphoblastic leukemia you may have a resistant disease even after radiation therapy plus bone marrow transplantation in 50% of patients.
In conclusion, anything simple, nontoxic and inexpensive, that is even only suspected to help a minority of children, should be quite welcome in this field.

I was quite scared eight years ago, when our second son started chemo and I found the 1988 report.
I knew of a vague 'miracle' story with cod liver oil in my family (grandpa) and all the good things that vitamins do.  Nevertheless that wasn't enough to feel safe: antivitamins like antifolic drugs (methotrexate) are the mainstay of these protocols, it was not a joke.
We began with 1 (one!) capsule a day together with all the other pills.  It seemed just nothing...still they were over 700caps in 2 years!.  I was afraid to unbalance a therapy, just like you pointed out here above, mentioning the unpredictable effects of an excess of vitamins in the body.
Finally, after maintenance treatment stop (24months) 2-4caps were just fine.  In the meantime I had got in touch with T.Timonen from Finland, he had missed the Chinese report; the vitamin D hypothesis was quite fascinating, and so I took more courage.  In 2005 the Egyptian study, the only one about vitD3 abnormally low levels in leukemia (diagnosis, 3mts, 12mts) gave me the certainty that this is a neglected area of investigation.
I actually found the Mansoura report in 2006 (talking about relaxation!) and it shocked me.
It was just time to move and do something.  Then I discovered this forum and instantly felt much better, knowing that now a parent like me may have instant access to this kind of information.
I shall work on key words and test it with different search engines: I can imagine what parents look for after a diagnosis of childhood leukemia.  Why? They don't understand why all this is happening to them, if it's their fault or not.  There is no known cause and just a treatment schedule to follow.  That's it.  So much for Science.
 
Our 'little boy' is a young healthy adult right now, grew up 7-8cm taller than his older brother, swims like a fish (!!), he does not look like a 'survivor' at all.   His 'path' (call it treatment schedule/protocol) has been almost a picnic compared with what other kids have to go through.  Nurses and doctors were very nice and professional, may be 'cod' has been good for him.  I hope that everyday 'cod' is helping in mitigating the invisible damage left by chemotherapy.
We'll never know.

ikod 


...uhm, 8 months, 124 replies, most of them auto-replies.
I think this topic is really coming to an end!
« Last Edit: 19/03/2008 07:37:01 by iko »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #123 on: 06/04/2007 17:21:40 »
Yes, you are corny enough. I thought you may be drinking fermented cod liver oil.
Zoey

Where the hell is Zoey?
This CLO-fanatics-club-jazz-band needs her sense of humour!

We're almost reaching the 6000 viewers!
I do not exactly know what it means: they seem lots and lots to me.
But they might open this topic and close it in seconds (Woooah! cancer in children!) or go through hundreds of posts and meditate and discuss it with friends.
Who knows.
I'm pretty sure that the Shanghai report had fewer readers in 1988, almost twenty years ago.

ikod




Yes, we are almost making 6000viewers.
Pinched between "Thunderclap headache during orgasm"
with 9909 and "The female orgasm" with 4645 viewers...
Isn't this amazing?
We are gonna make it for sure.

ikodgasm

« Last Edit: 11/04/2007 22:00:04 by iko »

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #124 on: 07/04/2007 04:30:45 »
 My main regret is not having the knowledge to upload pictures. Maybe  you should have taken up painting.

It is definitely time to take all this jazz about cod liver oil seriously, by teaspoonful, and earful:Listen to Cod Liver Oil and Orange Juice by Hamish Imlach for free on Rhapsody.
http://play.rhapsody.com/album/thetransatlanticstory/codliveroilandorangejuice
 And from Folk Music Tradition:
Cod Liver Oil
Lyrics:

I'm a young married man that is tired of life
Ten years I've been wed to a miserable wife
She does nothing all day but sit down and cry
And prays up to Heaven that soon she will die

Chorus:

Doctor, o doctor, o dear Doctor John
Your cod liver oil is so pure and so strong
I'm afraid of me life, I'll go down in the soil
If me wife keeps on drinking your cod liver oil

Well a friend of my own came to see me one day
He told my darlin' was pining away
He afterwards told me that she would get strong
If only I'd get a bottle from dear Doctor John

Chorus

It was then that I purchased a bottle to try
The way that she drank it you'd think she would die
I bought her another it vanished the same
O me wife she's got cod liver oil on the brain

Chorus

That me wife loves cod liver there isn't a doubt
And a few thousand gallons has made her quite stout
And now that she's stout it's made her quite strong
And now I'm jealous of dear Doctor John

Chorus

My house it resembles a medicine shop
It's covered with bottles from bottom to top
But then in the mornin' the kettle do boil
O you're sure it's singin' of cod liver oil

Chorus

Numerous Folk songs about the mighty cod that have been recorded. A partial list here:http://www.ibiblio.org/keefer/c08.htm

  I am taking the words and musical scores to several of the major cod liver oil researchers. That should bring more participants to this discussion.
Zoey
 

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #125 on: 07/04/2007 07:36:29 »

Quote
My main regret is not having the knowledge to upload pictures. Maybe  you should have taken up painting.

It is definitely time to take all this jazz about cod liver oil seriously, by teaspoonful, and earful:Listen to Cod Liver Oil and Orange Juice by Hamish Imlach for free on Rhapsody.

Welcome back Zoey,
uploading pictures is the easiest thing even for docs:
when you are editing your text and want to stick a pic,
just click on the image symbol. Then go to your nice
image wherever it is, click on it (right button of the
rat mouse) select Properties and copy the address
(URL) that should look familiar: http:// such and such.
Go back to the image symbol that should look like this:
[ img ][ /img ].  Then click in the middle of the two imgs
then right button and Paste...voilà.
When you save your text you should see your image ok,
otherwise edit again and see where the trouble is.
It may take ages, but if you are fishing readers for
your topics, it's a nice way to spend your free time...
It is quite an easy game as you see, good for kids up to
8-11yrs...who cares, I have great fun cutting & pasting.
I hope there is no major copyright problem, but if you
take some pics available for free from the web and
stick them into a forum...It should be all right.
Take care

ikod

« Last Edit: 07/04/2007 08:07:09 by iko »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #126 on: 07/04/2007 14:33:00 »
Quote
In this context cod liver oil should be recommended.
Even if you found that kids having orange juice in the morning have a reduced risk of leukemia, and all your data were statistically correct, a dispatch should be immediately sent to all the people concerned, parents, families, even doctors (don't tell them that there is no controlled trial available!). It is a sort of emergency, almost one third of patients have a relapse in the crucial 2-5 years after diagnosis. A relapsed leukemia does NOT respond to further standard treatments, so a more toxic intervention is required.
In relapsed lymphoblastic leukemia you may have a resistant disease even after radiation therapy plus bone marrow transplantation in 50% of patients.
In conclusion, anything simple, nontoxic and inexpensive, that is even only suspected to help a minority of children, should be quite welcome in this field.
iko

Yes, a self-citation,
not to show off, but to add bits and pieces that come to my mind and I forgot to put in the puzzle.
First sign of cod-dementia? Maybe.  Actually this topic is a sort of notebook for me: it might help in a final edition of a proper article.
I forgot to say that -in my personal opinion- our medicine could easily miss, in particular circumstances of 'mysterious diseases', pharmacological effects that come after weeks or months of treatment.
This could be the case of vitamin D3 (see the asylum seekers abstract from Switzerland, previous page) or the regression of MALTomas after Helicobacter pylori eradication.  Some 'fastidious' pathogens take ages to be eradicated (e.g. whipple disease).

When a substance takes time to work and we do not have a test to prove that something is positively changing, and/or we do not have a clue about the origin of a disease, everything gets more and more difficult.

I also forgot to mention (but many of us know it) that the treatment for peptic ulcer in the '60-'70s was surgical, half of the stomach (where ulcers develop) had to be removed. Cimetidine came in 1975 and for surgical routine in any hospital of the world was a real earthquake: ulcers were healing on cimetidine but recurred after stopping treatment.
No stomach transplant was performed in these patients (fortunately) and now we know that ulcers would obviously have recurred in the grafted organ.
Helicobacter pylori eradication successfully solves the problem in the vast majority of patients.
Finally in the late '70s fiberoptics became available even for gastroenterologists (from aerospace technology), making everything simpler for diagnosis and therapy.
When you really 'see' what is happening, everything becomes easier.




Diagram of the stomach, showing the different regions.
A gastrectomy is a partial or full surgical removal of the stomach.

The first successful gastrectomy was performed by Theodor Billroth in 1881 for cancer of the stomach. Gastrectomies are performed to treat cancer, severe cases of peptic ulcer disease, and perforations of the stomach wall. This procedure is becoming less common as peptic ulcers are now often treated with antibiotics for Helicobacter pylori or by endoscopy.

In severe duodenal ulcers it may be necessary to remove the lower portion of the stomach called the pylorus and the upper portion of the small intestine called the duodenum. If there is a sufficient portion of the upper duodenum remaining a Billroth I procedure is performed, where the remaining portion of the stomach is reattached to the duodenum before the bile duct and the duct of the pancreas. If the stomach cannot be reattached to the duodenum a Billroth II is performed, where the remaining portion of the duodenum is sealed off, a hole is cut into the next section of the small intestine called the jejunum and the stomach is reattached at this hole. As the pylorus is used to grind food and slowly release the food into the small intestine, removal of the pylorus can cause food to move into the small intestine faster than normal, leading to gastric dumping syndrome.
In the past a gastrectomy for peptic ulcer disease was often accompanied by a vagotomy, where the vagus nerve is cut to reduce acid production in the stomach. Nowadays, this problem is managed with proton pump inhibitors.

from:  http://www.search.com/reference/Gastrectomy 




« Last Edit: 07/04/2007 16:53:42 by iko »

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Offline dqfry

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #127 on: 07/04/2007 23:55:25 »
I'm new to the forum and topic. My 3-y-old son was Dx last month (ALL-Pre-B, Low Risk with TEL-AML1 translocation) Lots of things I want to share and ask, but manly, my son has been taking cod liver oil (Carlson's Lab.) since 6-months-old. We follow a very healthy and mostly organic diet. Nos that he has been diagnosed with ALL, I started doubting the power of nutrition and organic products (as well as cod liver oil) Nonetheless, I still give him CLO with his smoothies and to my 10-months-old daughter with her solids. Hopefully, all the good "stuff" will help him somehow through his treatment. Is there any online site I can buy the purest and best CLO without the adding flavor of Carlson's?

« Last Edit: 08/04/2007 00:35:35 by dqfry »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #128 on: 08/04/2007 06:33:11 »
 Welcome to this discussion! I cannot recommend any particular brand or company for the COL. However, a search on Google will turn up links to online sources for COL. I did a search on "vitamins" "online" "pure cod liver oil." I usually get mine at GNC or the local health food store. You shouldn't have a problem finding it.
    Have you ever read anything by the chemist, Roger Williams? { http://bioinst.cm.utexas.edu/williams/ }He is credited with making some of the most significant discoveries about nutrition over the last century. In his research he came to see that in all illness there is change in nutritional status on a cellular level. But this is more complicated than just having deficiencies. The doubt you feel about the role of nutrition may be a catalyst for you to put your understanding in a different perspective.
  While our level of health can make us less likely to get various illnesses, it won't make us immune to every disease. It just reduces our risks of getting some disorder or another.  Some of the more recent studies on the role of vitamin A in disease  highlights this point; childen with good levels of vitamin A are less likely to get measles when exposed to it. However, if they do get measles, the odds are good that they will not get seriously ill and die or go blind [measles is a very common cause of childhood blindness].
  I logged on with a question for Iko on this topic tonight. I'd like to know what changes are taking place on a cellular level when a child develops ALL?  This information may give some insight on how to best proceed in terms of diet and nutrition when ALL develops. Certainly, your son's nutrition is going to be important to his ability to recover from ALL and do as well as possible with his treatment.  Are you doing a lot of research on diet and ALL? The dietician at the hospital may have information for you too. I'll do more checking on the internet.
Zoey

 

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #129 on: 08/04/2007 08:20:04 »
Hi dqfry,

welcome to this topic. Your story gives us the confirmation that cod liver oil in childhood leukemia could only give a 'protective' effect, certainly not total immunity.  The results in the 1988 Chinese report were showing exactly this.
Your son should have a very good prognosis with standard treatment (less aggressive than in other types) for age and type of ALL...and he is taking 'cod' already!
Chances should be over 80% for your little boy and I wish you find splendid dedicated nurses and doctors like we did in 1999.  I think you are not exactly in the middle, but in a good point of this path: it will go downhill in a short while.
Your two little devils will keep you so busy that in the next few years the memory of these days will only be like a bad dream.  You started the same path we did several years ago and found this topic on the way: how did you manage to reach us? I'd like to know some details of your search.
Let's keep in touch.

ikod

P.S.  Sorry, but I cannot help in finding a particular type of cod liver oil.
Brands with reported quality controls are obviously recommended.
« Last Edit: 08/04/2007 08:59:10 by iko »

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Offline dqfry

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #130 on: 08/04/2007 09:23:04 »
I’ve met with a register dietitian at the hospital, but unfortunately the meeting was very frustrating. Therefore, I met with a local nutritionist that emphasized the importance of CLO and Probiotics among other things.  We discuss cellular repair through nutrition and how certain micronutrients deficiency can cause DNA damage associated with leukemia. I’ll continue working with her and hoping we’re making the right choices.

On a side note, following is something open for discussion. I’m really interested to hear iko’s input on this:

Full term baby boy born on February 17, 2004 at 8 pounds 7 ounces. Enlarged lymph node on left side of neck and left groin noticed 2 months after birth.  Pediatrician didn’t show concern. Identified mild torticollis at 3 months followed by physical therapy until he was 1-year-old. Significant lymph node enlargement (groin and neck left side only) after MMR vaccine at 12-months-old. Presence of petechiae in the lower abdomen and legs. Complete CBC didn’t show abnormalities. Pediatrician consider Lymphs and petechiae a reaction caused by MMR vaccine. Symptoms never desapeared completely. New petechiae sites appeared and lymph nodes didn’t go back to normal size (when compared to nodes on the right side). No colds or infections until December 1006 (2-years-old) diagnosed with a simple ear infection.  Symptoms subsided after 10 days in Amoxicillin. Minor upper respiratory infections follow, predictable due to attendance to Pre School. Fever and persistant cough that didn’t respond to antibiotics in January 2007. Diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Pre-B February 2007.

Considering the events and the fact that my son has been taking CLO on and off since he was 6-months-old, is it possible that the first set of symptoms (enlarged lymph nodes plus petechiae at 12-months) was a pre-leukemia event or even the presence of leukemia that resolved itself?

Mel Greaves’s hypothesis: “the final hit may be infectious”
How does that relate to non-isolated relapses? Considering that the genetic pre disposition was already present and that chemotherapy doesn’t fix DNA/gene lesion the same line of events/infection(s) has to take place again for a relapse?   Or, non-isolated relapses are a mere product of clones or residual leukemic cells?

Cheers

DQ

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #131 on: 08/04/2007 10:01:12 »
I’ve met with a register dietitian at the hospital, but unfortunately the meeting was very frustrating. Therefore, I met with a local nutritionist that emphasized the importance of CLO and Probiotics among other things.  We discuss cellular repair through nutrition and how certain micronutrients deficiency can cause DNA damage associated with leukemia. I’ll continue working with her and hoping we’re making the right choices.

I think you are doing fine, concentrating in the few things we can work on as parents.  Diet is obviously an important one.  You should trust your doctors 100% to relax a bit on the other issues that could be impossible to manage all on our own. Parents must take care of important things like CVC maintenance, to cite one.

Quote
Considering the events and the fact that my son has been taking CLO on and off since he was 6-months-old, is it possible that the first set of symptoms (enlarged lymph nodes plus petechiae at 12-months) was a pre-leukemia event or even the presence of leukemia that resolved itself?

Mel Greaves’s hypothesis: “the final hit may be infectious”
How does that relate to non-isolated relapses? Considering that the genetic pre disposition was already present and that chemotherapy doesn’t fix DNA/gene lesion the same line of events/infection(s) has to take place again for a relapse?   Or, non-isolated relapses are a mere product of clones or residual leukemic cells?

Here I can offer a personal opinion only. It is possible that those signs were predicting a leukemia, but you find them quite commonly in infants that don't develop ALL. So many times a similar condition may reverse by itself.

Difficult to answer your second question.  I'll tell you what I know (and it's not much).
A genetic predisposition might be switched on by an external factor, but steroid treatment and all the rest is hitting hard on the expanded clone that disappears quite quickly.  It should be a sort of immunological reset that probably works for life, considering the results observed in years.
Children of 2-4 years have the top expansion of lymphoid cells that prepare their immune system to fight viruses and bacteria.  So a clone escaping control is more common at this age.  Be prepared to accept the idea that the bad clone is already off and will never come back, and your kids will be as clever as George (another_someone, moderator in this forum, who was given 'cod' as a child).  May be more!   [;D]
Take care

ikod
« Last Edit: 08/04/2007 11:48:48 by iko »

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #132 on: 09/04/2007 05:26:56 »
Iko,
  What are some resources, with links, for folks on nutrition considerations during treatment for ALL?
Zoey
 

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #133 on: 09/04/2007 07:18:41 »
Hi Zoey,

you seem to do fine with cut&paste pictures!

I thought you read this in page 2 of this topic.
I left it intentionally there 'unexpanded' to avoid an anti-cod 'generalizing effect'.
The discussion about diet and cancer would lead us too far away from the subject and the aim of this topic.
It could be the title of a new topic and I wouldn't be in the number.
I already have my troubles to be 'scientifically correct' here and in the cod liver oil topic!
Too many nutrients have been proposed in the last few years, but their efficacy seems still unsubstantiated in most of the cases, and practical demonstrations too vague or totally absent.
It is NOT the purpose of this topic.
We have to stick to 'cod' and a vague 1988 article, especially now that dqfry joined us.
She gave us in a few words a clear and dramatic picture of the limits of this issue.


Cod liver oil used during standard treatment of leukemia, probably could just 'help' leukemic patients, perhaps counteracting a vitamin D3 deficiency that still has to be confirmed.
This positive effect has to be demonstrated in practice, and only for lack of toxicity and costs this use could be recommended before improbable officially conducted clinical trials.
We do not have detailed data from the Shanghai report as I told you: there were 'buried' in 5" diskettes so it is impossible to find out whether the 'protective' effect had been found lower or what in toddlers compared to growning-up 8-12yrs children (this was one of my questions to Dr. Shu in 1999).




Hi Zoey,
we're making an hypertopic here...
It's nice to quit my monologue for a change!

Quote
Also, do you think a child's level of vitamins A and D would affect the tendency to develop leukemia? If so, would children living in areas where deficiency in these nutrients are common might have a higher incidence of developing the disease?
Getting back onto the subject of treatment, what other nutritional factors do you think would work along with cod liver oil to overcome the negative effects of treatment?
Zoey
If we consider a multifactorial etiology in a fortunately rare disease, vitamin D and A+omega-3 may play a minor role together with all the rest.  Other factors interacting make quite difficult to catch a significant difference.

In underdeveloped countries leukemias are less represented compared to lymphomas. Urban (and wealthy?) people seem to be more exposed.
We may expect that a malnourished child, affected by multiple deficiencies could die from infection way before developing a leukemia (Hypothesis!).
If you search for a connection with lower vitamin D levels...well in USA coloured children have a slightly higher incidence of this disease.  This is just speculating...vitamin D levels should be tested more extensively after the Mansoura study in Egypt.
In my opinion, this would be the only way to estabilish a connection.

Other nutritional factors -mainly antioxidants- may help to overcome the negative effects of treatment.

It was summer then, and we had tons of squeezed icy lemon juice and fresh garlic bread from time to time (pure empirism)...

There are some studies about eating more healthy food and avoiding some toxic effect...

Low antioxidant vitamin intakes are associated with increases in adverse effects of chemotherapy in children witn acute lymphoblastic leukemia

...Chemotherapy leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species, which stresses the antioxidant defense system. Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia rarely are overtly malnourished, which makes this population ideal for an investigation of the relations between dietary antioxidant consumption, plasma antioxidant concentrations, and chemotherapy-induced toxicity.
...a 6-mo observational study of 103 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma micronutrient concentrations, dietary intakes, and incidence of side effects of chemotherapy were ascertained at diagnosis and after 3 and 6 mo of therapy...

Conclusion: A large percentage of children undergoing treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia have inadequate intakes of antioxidants and vitamin A. Lower intakes of antioxidants are associated with increases in the adverse side effects of chemotherapy
Kennedy D et al.     Am J Clin Nutr 2004;79:1029-36.

http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/79/6/1029

 
Antioxidant-Rich Diet Helps Fight Leukemia

As if undergoing chemotherapy isn't trying enough, kids with the most common form of childhood leukemia receiving this treatment may also experience a significant reduction in their antioxidant and micronutrient levels. This decrease could lead to severe side effects from the chemotherapy. However, there may be a ray of hope amidst this dark cloud.  According to a study, children could improve antioxidant and micronutrient levels and prevent some of the adverse side effects of chemotherapy by simply incorporating more fruits and vegetables into their diets.  The study, prompted by parental concern regarding children's safety in taking antioxidant supplements (such supplements might affect the high cure rate experienced with leukemia), involved more than 100 recently diagnosed children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The children had their antioxidant levels, antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage measured during their first six months of chemotherapy treatment.

Findings

Blood levels of vitamin E decreased over time, while vitamin A and total carotenoids increased
Vitamin C and oxidative damage increased within the first few months and declined by the sixth month.
Antioxidant levels were associated with side effects of the treatment; antioxidant capacity decreased throughout the course of the study
Children with higher concentrations of vitamins A, E and total carotenoids experienced fewer poor outcomes (such as infections and toxicity)
Based on the findings, researchers emphasized the importance of eating more fruits and vegetables -- which may provide a more balanced mix of antioxidants -- in addition to working with a nutritionist to improve the child's diet.
Forbes.com December 27, 2004.
Cancerpage.com December 27, 2004

Dr. Mercola's Comment:
It is no surprise that kids can better withstand the toll of chemotherapy by eating a diet full of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables. However, one needs to be VERY careful about using any product, even natural ones, as the ONLY approach to treating a complex illness like cancer, as it is likely to be counterproductive. For this reason, I have pulled together a list of alternatives to fight cancer.
Healthy Alternatives to Fight Cancer
1. Avoid sugar, as it is the primary fuel for most cancers.
Eating too much sugar and too many grains -- which are converted to sugar in the body -- will cause your blood sugar levels to rise. If your blood sugar levels remain elevated, even mildly, over a period of time, your risk of developing cancer increases.
Since I am fully aware that many people struggle with this sugar/grain restriction, I highly recommend using the energy psychology tool Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) to successfully treat stresses, including food cravings such as those related to sugar and grains.

2. Optimize your vitamin D levels, as it is probably the single most important vitamin in preventing and treating cancers.

The safest way to maintain healthy vitamin D levels is through sun exposure, but many of us are not able to do that in the winter, and some of us also stay indoors in the summer. For those that don't obtain enough sun exposure, taking a high-quality cod liver oil is a reasonable alternative. Taking a high-quality cod liver oil is more important than any supplement you can take because it is not a supplement at all -- it is an essential food...

NOTE: It important to have your vitamin D levels checked, as it is possible to overdose on vitamin D.

Sunlight, which causes us to produce vitamin D, can also help lower the risk of many cancers. Sunlight might actually be helpful in treating cancers directly through some, as yet, unidentified mechanism. One of my favorite books from last year, The Healing Sun Tom place link, provides some further details about this approach.
3. Make sure you exercise, as this will help lower your insulin levels.
There is no shortage of literature documenting the major benefits exercise has in lowering the risk of cancer and improving cancer once it is diagnosed. One of the major ways exercise works is by reducing insulin levels. It is quite clear that elevated insulin levels are associated with an increased risk of cancer.
When using exercise as a drug it will be important to have a goal of at least one hour per day, every day if you have high insulin levels or signs of them, such as:
High blood pressure
High cholesterol
Overweight
Diabetes
Obviously, depending on one's current condition, one needs to work slowly up to this level. My experience is that weight-bearing exercises, such as walking, jogging, running and elliptical machines, are better than cycling and swimming. If you are already in shape then you can limit your workouts to 45 minutes three or four times per week. However, if you are already in shape; then it is likely you won't have cancer, as many studies show that people who exercise have far less cancer rates...
Dr. Joseph Mercola

http://www.mercola.com/2005/jan/12/antioxidant_leukemia.htm

...perhaps even my Granny knew that...
iko

Idea.
While we look at the future of dqfry's child getting better and better thanks to the present 'gold standard' therapy that is probably close to 90% of success all over the world (he is on a LOW-risk treatment schedule, sorry to be pessimistic and always refer to 'my' medium-risk experience), and we hopefully watch his mother getting out of a nightmare mostly bound to a word:  leukemia.
It reminds me what I told my little boy in the first days of treatment: you don't have a 'real' leukemia, it should not be called like that anymore, because this type is so mild that they're going to cure it completely.
My wife and I kept bad feelings and shaking legs for ourselves.

While some other parents are eventually finding this information and consider giving 'cod' to their sick children.

Let's turn backwards again for a while.
The 'ancient' paper about cod liver oil you found weeks ago should not be the only one.
More 'vintage' information might help us a lot now.

ikod


...let's go on from here, 4 example:

Iko,
  Go here for some history of how cod liver oil has been used in medicine for the last 150 years.
Zoey
http://www.henriettesherbal.com/eclectic/kings/gadus_oleu.html
« Last Edit: 09/04/2007 19:28:35 by iko »

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paul.fr

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #134 on: 09/04/2007 09:24:18 »
Zoey,

i can't find the topic about the plague! so i thought i would post this here, somewhere i knew you would read it.

Sorry Iko if this is not relevant to the subject

Zoey, last night i was reading some old copies of New Scientist (2004) and found some info that you may be interested in, about Nicholas Culpeper

here are a few links you may find interesting:

http://www.mayflowerfamilies.com/enquirer/nicholas_culpeper.htm
http://www.med.yale.edu/library/historical/culpeper/culpeper.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Culpeper

Paul

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #135 on: 09/04/2007 09:51:05 »
Hi Paul,

I am afraid that Zoey had a typical topic-who-nobody-cares-of annihilating crisis a while ago!
She'll make it resuscitate, I hope!
Naughty Zoey  [;)]

ikod
« Last Edit: 09/04/2007 14:17:07 by iko »

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paul.fr

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #136 on: 09/04/2007 10:13:45 »
Hi Paul,

I am afraid that Zoey had a typical topic-who-nobody-caresof annihilating crisis a while ago!
She'll make it resuscitate, I hope!
Naughty Zoey  [;)]

ikod

ah, that explains it. the topic was still rather interesting though. any way sorry for the little hijack, Iko.

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #137 on: 09/04/2007 14:13:32 »
Hi Paul,

I am afraid that Zoey had a typical topic-who-nobody-cares-of annihilating crisis a while ago!
She'll make it resuscitate, I hope!
Naughty Zoey  [;)]

ikod

ah, that explains it. the topic was still rather interesting though. any way sorry for the little hijack, Iko.

No problem Paul,

there is plenty of space left in this hyperspecific topic.
To be honest, leukemia could be one of the mysterious 'plagues' left in overdeveloped countries!
Zoey's late topic (what a shame to kill a newborn topic!)
was 100% medicine and nutrition, so be our guest, please. [^]

ikod

P.S :
me checked your links.
How fascinating this Nicky Culpeper (1616-1654)...just few minutes ago (approx. 2.1x10E8)!
Garlic and Rosemary were partiiccccularrrly appreciated by meiko!
« Last Edit: 09/04/2007 19:33:31 by iko »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #138 on: 09/04/2007 16:39:54 »
Playing like dumb babies with Neil and Karen is not that bad...
from General Science: A-Z of Anything/Anyone...

Carnosic acid


Cooperative antitumor effects of vitamin D3 derivatives
and rosemary preparations in a mouse model of myeloid leukemia.

Sharabani H, Izumchenko E, Wang Q, Kreinin R, Steiner M, Barvish Z, Kafka M, Sharoni Y, Levy J, Uskokovic M, Studzinski GP, Danilenko M.
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.

1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25D(3)) is a powerful differentiation agent, which has potential for treatment of myeloid leukemias and other types of cancer, but the calcemia produced by pharmacologically active doses precludes the use of this agent in the clinic. We have shown that carnosic acid, the major rosemary polyphenol, enhances the differentiating and antiproliferative effects of low concentrations of 1,25D(3) in human myeloid leukemia cell lines (HL60, U937). Here we translated these findings to in vivo conditions using a syngeneic mouse leukemia tumor model. To this end, we first demonstrated that as in HL60 cells, differentiation of WEHI-3B D(-) murine myelomonocytic leukemia cells induced by 1 nM 1,25D(3) or its low-calcemic analog, 1,25-dihydroxy-16-ene-5,6-trans-cholecalciferol (Ro25-4020), can be synergistically potentiated by carnosic acid (10 microM) or the carnosic acid-rich ethanolic extract of rosemary leaves. This effect was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in G0 + G1 phase and a marked inhibition of cell growth. In the in vivo studies, i.p. injections of 2 microg Ro25-4020 in Balb/c mice bearing WEHI-3B D(-) tumors produced a significant delay in tumor appearance and reduction in tumor size, without significant toxicity. Another analog, 1,25-dihydroxy-16,23Z-diene-20-epi-26,27-hexafluoro-19-nor-cholecalciferol (Ro26-3884) administered at the same dose was less effective than Ro25-4020 and profoundly toxic. Importantly, combined treatment with 1% dry rosemary extract (mixed with food) and 1 microg Ro25-4020 resulted in a strong cooperative antitumor effect, without inducing hypercalcemia. These results indicate for the first time that a plant polyphenolic preparation and a vitamin D derivative can cooperate not only in inducing leukemia cell differentiation in vitro, but also in the antileukemic activity in vivo. These data may suggest novel protocols for chemoprevention or differentiation therapy of myeloid leukemia. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Int J Cancer. 2006 Jun 15;118(12):3012-21.


« Last Edit: 09/04/2007 20:05:48 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #139 on: 09/04/2007 23:22:43 »
Excuse me Iko,
 I too, digress for a moment.
Paul,
  Thanks for the links. I nixed the topic as no one was addressing the question, how the herbs and spices used medicinally in that time worked as antibiotics so I could better explain it to readers when writing an article on the subject.
   The difficulty and misunderstanding we encountered there is all too common. As the chemist, Roger Williams, wrote, "When science becomes doctrine, it ceases to be science."
  What I started as a science topic was immediately met with religous doctrine, attacking beliefs, positions, I did not hold. Any opportunities to discuss the subject with open mind were lost at the outset. The science and prospects of discovering anything new were pre-empted by the "peer pressure" to restrict my perceptions and statements to those fitting their doctrines.




 Ironically, my own searching found much evidence to suggest that crowding and filth held a greater influence on the spread of the plague than did any medicines-not so different than today, is it?
  When a subject threatens the listener's world view, especially that of a fundamentalist, it will be rejected, and fundamentalists do shoot the messengers. The need is very great for some to have reality limited to finite terms and possibilities.  Untold numbers of physicians, and scientists, still hold the view that disease is caused by " foreign invaders" and cannot be a "natural" process. A current example is herpes, varieties of which infect much of the world's population. In order for the herpes virus to replicate, it requires an increased supply of the amino acid arginine in relation to another amino acid, lysine. Unless this need is met the virus cannot thrive in its host.

"Chemotherapy. 1981;27(3):209-13. Links
Relation of arginine-lysine antagonism to herpes simplex growth in tissue culture.Griffith RS, DeLong DC, Nelson JD.
In the studies conducted, arginine deficiency suppressed herpes simplex virus replication in tissue culture. Lysine, an analog of arginine, as an antimetabolite, antagonized the viral growth-promoting action of arginine. The in vitro data may be the basis for the observation that patients prone to herpetic lesions and other related viral infections, particularly during periods of stress, should abstain from arginine excess and may also require supplemental lysine in their diet.

PMID: 6262023 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]"


   Peer pressure limiting discussions is true with Iko's CLO for leukaemia prevention; those who do not acknowledge the role of nutrition in the development of disease, will reject the possible role of CLO as a preventive because it violates the underlying assumptions about how leukaemia develops.
   
  A very good example of this is the opposition the scientist Alfred Sommer met in his work on the relationship between vitamin A deficiency, childhood blindness, and mortality. He saw a decade of research ignored before some of his colleagues could accept that vitamin A deficiency leads impaired immune function in healthy as well as malnourished children, as well as blindness. He writes eloquently of his experience:


[Top of Report] - [Top of Section] - [Next Page] - [Previous Page]

A bridge too near
By Alfred Sommer
Dr. Alfred Sommer is Professor and Dean at the School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. He has been in the forefront of research into vitamin A deficiency for almost 20 years, and led the two major Indonesian studies described in this article.

For almost a decade, medical science ignored or rejected the evidence that vitamin A could reduce child deaths by between a quarter and a third in many countries of the developing world.

Today, the scepticism of the 1980s has been swept away by an avalanche of data. And as the tables on the following pages show, most nations are now moving to make this most cost-effective of all health interventions available to their children.

If this effort succeeds, then we can expect to bring about a fall in child deaths of somewhere between 1 million and 3 million per annum.

Discovered in 1913, vitamin A has taken almost a century to come into its own. It has long been known that the lack of this particular vitamin could cause stunting, infection, and blindness in animals. But it was 1974 before the first report was published (by WHO) on vitamin A deficiency as a major cause of blindness among the children of the developing world.

Missing the point

In that same year, a research project was launched in Indonesia to find out more about vitamin A deficiency, and particularly about what levels of deficiency were associated with xerophthalmia (the inflammation and drying of the eye that can result in permanent blindness). Over a period of a year and a half, 4,000 children were examined at three-month intervals.

By 1981 much useful information had been gleaned. But in looking only for what we expected to see, we had missed what the data itself had revealed. Unlooked-for and unseen amid the mass of figures was a much more dramatic message.

One December evening almost a year later, while a particular set of figures was being cross-tabulated, it became apparent that many xerophthalmic children were missing from later cross-tabulations. Running the computer analysis in the reverse direction revealed what the data had been waiting to tell us all along: children with even mild xerophthalmia were dying at a far greater rate.

Any suggestion that the higher death rate was caused by malnutrition, of which the lack of vitamin A was merely a symptom, was quickly dispelled. Malnutrition clearly increases the risk of child death, but so does vitamin A deficiency - even among adequately nourished children. In fact the Indonesian study showed that malnourished children with adequate vitamin A were less likely to die than well-nourished children who were deficient in vitamin A.

Preliminary calculations, soon to be revised upwards, showed that if xerophthalmia could be prevented, then the death rate among children aged one to six would fall by approximately 20%. Analysis also showed that the risk of death was directly related to the degree of deficiency.

To test these extraordinary conclusions, a second Indonesian study was launched. This time, vitamin A capsules were given every six months to approximately 20,000 young children in 450 randomly chosen villages. The result was a one-third reduction in death rates, compared with villages where there had been no intervention.

These findings were published in The Lancet and other medical journals. The response was the long silence of disbelief.

With its vision fixed on the high-tech and high-cost frontiers of modern medical care, the medical and research establishment found it difficult to accept that something as simple and cheap as a 2-cent capsule of vitamin A could represent such a break-through for human life and health. Perhaps in some quarters, also, there was an innate and ideological dislike of `magic bullet' solutions to health problems which do not directly address the underlying problems of poverty.

Whatever the reason, a discovery that seemed to promise so much had caused barely a ripple on the surface of medical interest.

It was at this point that a wise colleague pointed out that this was the normal first reaction to any unexpected research finding. The next stage, he advised, was to "bury them in data."

Knowing that measles often leads to vitamin A loss, we had begun to wonder if Africa's high death rates from measles might also be connected with vitamin A deficiency. To test this, children hospitalized with measles in Tanzania were given vitamin A capsules. The measles death rate fell by half. It was at this point that we discovered, to our astonishment, that a similar experiment had been conducted 50 years earlier in a London hospital - with the same results: medicine too has doors it did not enter, paths it did not take.

WHO and UNICEF now acted quickly to make vitamin A supplementation a routine part of measles treatment. More broadly, the elimination of the deficiency became one of the goals adopted by the World Summit for Children held at UNICEF's instigation in the fall of 1990. The progress being made towards that goal is shown in the following tables.

By 1992, the results were in from several large, community-based investigations into vitamin A deficiency. Ghana, India, Indonesia, and Nepal all yielded results in line with the one-third reduction in mortality rates revealed by the original research in Indonesia.

At this point, the medical community accepted our conclusions as unanimously as it had dismissed them a decade earlier. A colleague who had earlier written a leader in The New England Journal of Medicine titled `Too good to be true', now published a paper under the heading `Too good not to be true'.

With the scientific community in full agreement, ministries of health across the world have now given the green light to vitamin A supplementation. Unfortunately, official recommendations usually stress vitamin A supplementation only where there is evidence of severe deficiency, whereas the evidence suggests that supplementation can significantly reduce mortality even among populations with mild vitamin A deficiency. Further studies are now needed to quantify this effect.

Three ways

Increasing vitamin A intake can be achieved by three main methods - improving diets, fortifying common foods, and distributing vitamin A capsules.

The politically correct method is dietary improvement through the addition of green leafy vegetables or carrots. Of course diets should be improved. But this is a slow and uncertain process, and there are doubts about whether it can provide sufficient vitamin A even where dietary change is indeed achieved. Certainly, more work is needed on the most effective dietary ways of beating vitamin A deficiency.

Some countries, particularly in Central America, have fortified sugar with vitamin A (the problem was solved in the industrialized world by adding vitamin A to common foods such as milk, bread, and margarine). But in the developing world as a whole, food fortification is only beginning to be explored.

In the meantime, at least two children are dying every minute for the lack of the protection that vitamin A can bring.

The 2-cent capsules are therefore an essential weapon for the defence of children. And the outreach systems which have been built or strengthened by the immunization effort of the last decade have now made it possible to deliver that protection to the great majority of children at risk.

There can be no excuse for further delay.



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http://www.unicef.org/pon95/nutr0002.html


   This is not history, it is current events. Sommer and his work are more recognized now, yet there continue to be many physicians and scientists who fail to "get it" in terms of understanding the science of disease development in terms of nutritional factors. How can the alteration of the aberrant cells in leukaemia be studied and understood without recognizing the substances [nutrients] of which those cells are comprised? With CLO as an ALL preventive, there is much too learn which may well be bypassed because current doctrines restrict what some scientists are permitted to see, or express openly.

Iko,
 I agree, let's all of us start plying the stacks in the libraries searching for clues not yet known. Your posts are so many, I must dedicate a few days to studying them to keep up in this discussion and write the press releases. Thanks for the reposts. Now that you put your foot in the door, Paul, you may want to do some of the research for this topic too.



   
 

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Offline dqfry

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #140 on: 09/04/2007 23:41:34 »
I'm grateful for the advance cancer therapy available to us - specially being from a 3rd world country where resources are limited. I'm certain that we're not to far from target therapy and even more vaccines for certain cancers (including Leukemias)

Why did my "super baby" who was breastfed for 12-months and only receive the best and most natural nutrition available is fighting such a nasty disease? Although my initial reaction was to give up the CLO, acai (Brazilian berry loaded with antioxidants), organics, and everything else I was raised on, I couldn't!

So, today is a great day because my son is still with us and he had his spoon of CLO this morning with breakfast (sometimes is virtually impossible get that spoon of CLO go down)

Lastly, I'll take the blame for Zoey's "topic-who-nobody-caresof annihilating crisis". Maybe my initial post got her excited!!!!!

Cheers

DQfry

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #141 on: 10/04/2007 05:11:42 »
Hi DQ,
 
There's a misunderstanding about the "no care" references; a week or so ago I started a different topic. There were some misunderstandings and bad feelings so I erased the entire discussion [Sometimes when I get upset I hold my breath until I look really awful too!]. It had nothing to do with your posts at all.


Why did my "super baby" who was breastfed for 12-months and only receive the best and most natural nutrition available is fighting such a nasty disease? Although my initial reaction was to give up the CLO, acai (Brazilian berry loaded with antioxidants), organics, and everything else I was raised on, I couldn't!
-----------------------------------
You are raising important questions. So how do we start with finding answers? One thing comes to mind. When gathering information on vitamin D deficiency and seizures in children, I read that breast milk does not contain sufficient amounts to meet the needs for infants.:

"PEDIATRICS Vol. 111 No. 4 April 2003, pp. 908-910


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CLINICAL REPORT


Prevention of Rickets and Vitamin D Deficiency: New Guidelines for Vitamin D Intake
Lawrence M. Gartner, MD, Frank R. Greer, MD, Section on Breastfeeding and Committee on Nutrition
ABSTRACT

Rickets in infants attributable to inadequate vitamin D intake and decreased exposure to sunlight continues to be reported in the United States. It is recommended that all infants, including those who are exclusively breastfed, have a minimum intake of 200 IU of vitamin D per day beginning during the first 2 months of life. In addition, it is recommended that an intake of 200 IU of vitamin D per day be continued throughout childhood and adolescence, because adequate sunlight exposure is not easily determined for a given individual. These new vitamin D intake guidelines for healthy infants and children are based on the recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences."
http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/pediatrics;111/4/908
  The focus here is on rickets prevention and it appears there is no consideration in this and similar studies to the effects of Vitamin D deficiency on suseptibility to diseases such as cancer.
 Also, the other major vitamin in CLO, vitamin A, can also be in short supply in breast milk. Just to make this more complex, zinc deficiency via breast feeding may also pose a problem with development and resistence to disease.

"European Journal of Clinical Nutrition:December 1998, Volume 52, Number 12, Pages 884-890
Moderate zinc and vitamin A deficiency in breast milk of mothers from East-Jakarta
...Conclusions: Multi-micronutrient intervention should be considered to provide a sufficient supply of zinc and vitamin A for growth of exclusively breast-fed infants"
http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v52/n12/abs/1600660a.html

Some earlier posts in this discussion have information on vitamin A and zinc deficiencies and how this may affect suseptibility to developing leukemia as well.
I'm glad you had a good day and hope you will be having many of them as you see your son recover.
 

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paul.fr

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #142 on: 10/04/2007 09:46:47 »
Now that you put your foot in the door, Paul, you may want to do some of the research for this topic too.


i only tested the water with my toes, not yet ready to go for a swim.

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #143 on: 10/04/2007 22:55:45 »
Iko,
 My foot is firmly in my mouth! I missed the points you made above regarding the limits of this topic. So sorry and will be extra cautious now.
Zoey
 

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #144 on: 10/04/2007 23:24:31 »
Quote
Too many nutrients have been proposed in the last few years, but their efficacy seems still unsubstantiated in most of the cases, and practical demonstrations too vague or totally absent.
It is NOT the purpose of this topic.
We have to stick to 'cod' and a vague 1988 article, especially now that dqfry joined us.
She gave us in a few words a clear and dramatic picture of the limits of this issue.


Cod liver oil used during standard treatment of leukemia, probably could just 'help' leukemic patients, perhaps counteracting a vitamin D3 deficiency that still has to be confirmed.
This positive effect has to be demonstrated in practice, and only for lack of toxicity and costs this use could be recommended before improbable officially conducted clinical trials.
We do not have detailed data from the Shanghai report as I told you: there were 'buried' in 5" diskettes so it is impossible to find out whether the 'protective' effect had been found lower or what in toddlers compared to growning-up 8-12yrs children (this was one of my questions to Dr. Shu in 1999).

iko   09/04/2007

We're free to open various topics and keep this one ultraspecific to avoid generalizations and dispersion of the few evidences I think we have.

Dqfry surely thinks that 'cod' is not so much effective, and we'd think the same thing, being in her shoes.  So I have to remind my question about age correlations with the protective' effect.  I'll try to explain my thoughts.
The infectious hypothesis, bound to an hypothetical overridden immune reaction to a common pathogen and abnormal expansion of a specific clone of lymphocytes may concern older kids, not infants and toddlers, who show lymphocyte hyperactivity even in normal conditions.  A difference bound simply to age and immunological 'activity' may be present. Concentration of the disease within the bones, with typical bone aches and very few lymphnodes enlarged and rarely fever is more common in older children.
We'll never know whether in the 1988 Shanghai study a protective effect (actually stronger in myeloid leukemia) had been found dispersed or concentrated in a particular age group.

Nevertheless, as clearly shown in those 'ancient' tables, 8% cod in controls versus 4% cod in leukemic children is significant all right, but does not mean total immunity.
My speculation is: could most of the patients benefit of a protective effect in the long run, or only patients doing already fine with standard treatments?
In this second hypothesis no adjunctive therapeutic effect could be observed.
After all this mess.

ikod






click here for a proper view:   http://www.electric-fields.bris.ac.uk/Aetiology.jpg
« Last Edit: 15/03/2008 18:07:00 by iko »

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #145 on: 10/04/2007 23:43:49 »
 I just did a search on press releases from the American Academy for the Advancement of Science-not one single research report for this year is listed.
 

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Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #146 on: 11/04/2007 00:05:23 »
iko   09/04/2007
[/quote]
My speculation is: could most of the patients benefit of a protective effect in the long run, or only patients doing already fine with standard treatments?
In this second hypothesis no adjunctive therapeutic effect could be observed.
After all this mess.

ikod

http://www.electric-fields.bris.ac.uk/Aetiology.jpg[/center]
[/quote]
Should we be looking at population studies and comparing rates of recovery?
 

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #147 on: 11/04/2007 15:53:24 »

Should we be looking at population studies and comparing rates of recovery?


Yap!
you mean finding out survival results related to...what, age?
It's a real jungle, even different from one study to another!

...this one is from Denmark:


ikod
« Last Edit: 11/04/2007 21:57:06 by iko »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #148 on: 11/04/2007 22:51:13 »
Hi friendos,

Cod liver oil in childhood leukemia
...and the vitamin D3 connection.
The discussion is open, waiting for a real
scientist who explains to this bunch of loonies
the difference between a 'coincidence' and real
heavy and thick scientific evidence!   [;D]

ikod


Season and ethnicity are determinants of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations
in New Zealand children aged 5-14 y.

Rockell JE, Green TJ, Skeaff CM, Whiting SJ, Taylor RW, Williams SM, Parnell WR, Scragg R, Wilson N, Schaaf D, Fitzgerald ED, Wohlers MW.
Department of Human Nutrition, Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

New Zealand children, particularly those of Maori and Pacific ethnicity, may be at risk for low vitamin D status because of low vitamin D intakes, the country's latitude (35-46 degrees S), and skin color. The aim of this study was to determine 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and their determinants in a national sample of New Zealand children aged 5-14 y. The 2002 National Children's Nutrition Survey was designed to survey New Zealand children, including oversampling of Maori and Pacific children to allow ethnic-specific analyses. A 2-stage recruitment process occurred using a random selection of schools, and children within each school. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration [mean (99% CI) nmol/L] in Maori children (n = 456) was 43 (38,49), in Pacific (n = 646) 36 (31,42), and in New Zealand European and Others (NZEO) (n = 483) 53 (47,59). Among Maori, Pacific, and NZEO, the prevalence (%, 99% CI) of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency (<17.5 nmol/L) was 5 (2,12), 8 (5,14), and 3 (1,7), respectively. The prevalence of insufficiency (<37.5 nmol/L) was 41 (29,53), 59 (42,75), and 25 (15,35), respectively. Multiple regression analysis found that 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were lower in winter than summer [adjusted mean difference (99% CI) nmol/L; 15 (8,22)], lower in girls than boys [5 (1,10)], and lower in obese children than in those of "normal" weight [6 (1,11)]. Relative to NZEO, 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were lower in Maori [9 (3,15)] and Pacific children [16 (10,22)]. Ethnicity and season are major determinants of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. There is a high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in New Zealand children, which may or may not contribute to increased risk of osteoporosis and other chronic disease. There is a pressing need for more convincing evidence concerning the health risks associated with the low vitamin D status in New Zealand children.

J Nutr. 2005 Nov;135(11):2602-8.





Comparison of cancer mortality and incidence in New Zealand and Australia.

Skegg DC, McCredie MR.
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin.

AIMS: To compare cancer mortality and incidence data from New Zealand and Australia, in order to gauge the potential for reducing deaths from cancer in New Zealand. METHODS: For 1996 and 1997, numbers of deaths from cancer, numbers of new cases, and population data were stratified in 5-year age-groups. Numbers observed in New Zealand were compared with numbers expected from Australian rates. Age-standardized mortality and incidence rates for each sex were analysed.
RESULTS: New Zealanders of both sexes experienced more deaths from cancer than expected in every age group. If Australian rates had applied, there would have been 215 fewer cancer deaths per year in New Zealand males, and 616 fewer in females. The largest differences related to breast cancer and lung cancer in women, and colorectal cancer in both sexes. The overall incidence of cancer was higher in New Zealand, but mortality/incidence ratios were also higher for many sites--suggesting that survival after treatment has been poorer in New Zealand than in Australia. CONCLUSIONS: Considerable scope exists for reducing cancer mortality in New Zealand. For a national cancer control strategy, it will be essential to clarify reasons for the high incidence of cancer and to study survival following treatment.

N Z Med J. 2002 May 10;115(1153):205-8.





« Last Edit: 13/04/2007 16:38:55 by iko »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #149 on: 12/04/2007 11:31:19 »
Quick search for vitamin D deficiency in New Zealand:



Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant New Zealand women.

Judkins A, Eagleton C.
Department of Endocrinology, Wellington Hospital, Private Bag 7902, Wellington. carl.eagleton@ccdhb.org.nz

AIM: This aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women of a Wellington general practice where 10 cases of childhood rickets had been diagnosed over the past 3 years. METHODS: Ninety pregnant women were screened for vitamin D deficiency by measuring 25-hydroxy vitamin D by DiaSorin radioimmunoassay. Recruitment into the study was over a 12-month period. A second appointment was arranged for clinical review and drawing of blood for parathyroid hormone, adjusted calcium, and alkaline phosphatase. RESULTS: 100% of women presenting to the general practice for antenatal care consented to the study.
87% of women had 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels below 50 nmol/L.
61.2% of women had a vitamin D level below 25 nmol/L consistent with severe vitamin D deficiency. 10 women had an elevated parathyroid hormone consistent with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Only 22% of our patients were veiled, and included a diverse ethnic population, including African, Maori, European, Middle Eastern, and Polynesian women. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency is common in young pregnant women in this general practice, and it was not only confined to veiled women or women with dark skin. This highlights the magnitude of vitamin D deficiency in the pregnant population in a New Zealand setting; this vitamin D deficiency is responsible for the re-emergence of childhood rickets.

N Z Med J. 2006 Sep 8;119(1241):U2144.





Rickets in alpacas (Lama pacos) in New Zealand.

Hill FI, Thompson KG, Grace ND.
AgResearch, Flock House Agricultural Centre, Private Bag 1900, Bulls 5242, New Zealand.

Rickets was diagnosed in two weaner alpacas from a flock showing ill thrift and lameness during the winter of 1992. Both animals had abnormally shaped ribs with occasional healing fractures, irregular thickening of growth plates and metaphyseal haemorrhages. The mean serum phosphorus concentrations of the alpacas fell during June and July, even though lambs grazing the same pasture had normal serum phosphorus concentrations and the phosphorus concentration of the pasture was considered adequate. Vitamin D deficiency may also have contributed to the osteodystrophy. The alpacas had a thick fleece during the winter, and diurnal Vitamin D, synthesis resulting from solar irradiation is likely to have been minimal, especially considering the reduced sunshine hours recorded during the 1992 winter. Surviving alpacas recovered after treatment with monosodium phosphate and an oral Vitamin D supplement. It is possible alpacas are more susceptible to deficiencies of phosphorus and Vitamin D than other grazing animals in New Zealand.

N Z Vet J. 1994 Dec;42(6):229-32.





VITAMIN D
By Nic Cooper, Southern Alpacas Stud

In the early days of alpacas in New Zealand, the industry saw  many cases of carpal valgus (bent or bowed front legs)  in alpacas.  These ranged from minor to the extreme. The higher concentration appeared to be amongst the darker coloured animals, and it appeared in youngsters, particularly when autumn born, during winter. At Southern Alpacas Stud one of your first cria born, in 1990, developed extreme rickets.

The effect was quickly traced, by researchers, to a vitamin D or phosphorous deficiency, and led to a lot of breeders sprinkling di-calcium phosphate on nuts, and adding other such supplements to nut mixes.

Research in the mid 1990's (ex USA) then indicated that treatment with vitamin D alone would alleviate the clinical signs, and (ex Australia) that di-calcium phosphate was actually bad for your alpacas. But read on for 2005 information ......

Vitamin D (particularly vitamin D3 – chalecalciferol) is necessary to the alpaca to allow it to absorb calcium and phosphorous from the intestinal tract. 

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body, phosphorous is the second most abundant. These minerals are required for proper bone development. Many enzymes and B vitamins are activated only in the presence of Phosphorous.

Phosphate is the naturally occurring form of the element phosphorus. Phosphate deficiency is what is measured in the bloods, and we treat with a phosphorus compound.

The natural Calcium/Phosphorous ratio in bones and teeth in 2:1, (although 1.5:1 in alpaca is closer to the ideal), and vitamin D is essential for maintaining this balance correctly.

Adequate vitamin D levels also minimise the loss of these two minerals through the kidneys (in excreta).

Vitamin D3 is produced through synthesis in the alpacas skin, from the action of ultraviolet light (sunlight) on cholesterol derivatives. In New Zealand the lower latitudes, and lower altitudes reduce this production, especially in winter, especially in darker pigmented animals, and especially in animals with denser fleeces.

Vitamin D also comes from consumption of sun cured dried foods, such as hay (which has vitamin D2).  A lush grass diet in NZ also therefore limits the production of vitamin D in the alpaca.
In addition, on lush pastures, high concentrations of carotenes can tie up vitamin D making less available to the body.
...
 
updated November 2005.


complete article:   http://www.alpacasnz.co.nz/articles-vitamind.htm



« Last Edit: 19/04/2007 08:31:02 by iko »