Re: Why don't an atom's electrons fall into the nucleus and stick to the protons?

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Offline jccc

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This question to me is the most confusing one in physics. So many views, so little answer.

I thought our detecting power can only measure basic particle size. If space is full of infinity small negative charged mini particles, we cannot notice it. Name it enertron.

But if it did exist, let's image what will happen.

I think protons will attract enertrons to form a very dense ball shape negative field and electrons will push enertrons to form a very hollo ball shape less negative field.

Therefore, electrons can hardly get very close to protons. Protons attract electrons in, the negative field around protons pushes electrons out, balancing/themovibrating at radius. 

Sounds more logical than quantum theory to me. 

Hunger for your thoughts.

JP, mind to comment?

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Offline JP

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This question to me is the most confusing one in physics. So many views, so little answer.

I thought our detecting power can only measure basic particle size. If space is full of infinity small negative charged mini particles, we cannot notice it. Name it enertron.

But if it did exist, let's image what will happen.

I think protons will attract enertrons to form a very dense ball shape negative field and electrons will push enertrons to form a very hollo ball shape less negative field.

Therefore, electrons can hardly get very close to protons. Protons attract electrons in, the negative field around protons pushes electrons out, balancing/themovibrating at radius. 

Sounds more logical than quantum theory to me. 

Hunger for your thoughts.

JP, mind to comment?

Nope, since this is a New Theories topic.  :)

As you've been asked several times to move such posts to New Theories, I'm moving this and future posts to New Theories.