Is space an "ocean of photons"?

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Offline DRoberts

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Is space an "ocean of photons"?
« on: 24/07/2014 05:28:02 »
Seemingly infinite stars are emitting seemingly infinite photons into space, seemingly infinitely. Space is dark because there is not a lot in space for photons to interact with, but whenever something is in space for photons to interact with, we find that photons are there. Does this mean that space is an "ocean of photons"? Does this hold with the theory of mass energy equivalence that all matter is just "slowed" or "condensed" or "less energetic" energy??
« Last Edit: 24/07/2014 05:56:27 by DRoberts »

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Offline PmbPhy

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Re: Is space an "ocean of photons"?
« Reply #1 on: 24/07/2014 06:34:32 »
Quote from: DRoberts
Does this mean that space is an "ocean of photons"?
Hello DRoberts. Allow me to be the first to welcome to the forum! :)

Quote from: DRoberts
Does this hold with the theory of mass energy equivalence that all matter is just "slowed" or "condensed" or "less energetic" energy??
If you're referring to the mass-energy equivalence [tex]E = mc^2[/tex] then you're misinterpreting what it means. The mass-energy equivalence means that if the energy of a body decreases by the amount E then it's mass decreases by the amount [tex]mc^2[/tex].

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Offline DRoberts

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Re: Is space an "ocean of photons"?
« Reply #2 on: 24/07/2014 09:58:56 »
Quote from: DRoberts
Does this mean that space is an "ocean of photons"?
Hello DRoberts. Allow me to be the first to welcome to the forum! :)

Quote from: DRoberts
Does this hold with the theory of mass energy equivalence that all matter is just "slowed" or "condensed" or "less energetic" energy??
If you're referring to the mass-energy equivalence [tex]E = mc^2[/tex] then you're misinterpreting what it means. The mass-energy equivalence means that if the energy of a body decreases by the amount E then it's mass decreases by the amount [tex]mc^2[/tex].

I guess I assumed both because it seemed like energy "is the force carrier" for mass?

"In physics, mass–energy equivalence is the concept that the mass of an object or system is a measure of its energy content. For instance, adding 25 kilowatt-hours (90 megajoules) of any form of energy to any object increases its mass by 1 microgram,"

So you would say that 25 kilowatt-hours of energy will "add" 1 microgram of mass, but 25 kilowatt-hours of energy also "isn't" 1 microgram of mass?
« Last Edit: 24/07/2014 10:01:14 by DRoberts »

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Offline PmbPhy

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Re: Is space an "ocean of photons"?
« Reply #3 on: 24/07/2014 10:29:11 »
Quote from: DRoberts
So you would say that 25 kilowatt-hours of energy will "add" 1 microgram of mass, but 25 kilowatt-hours of energy also "isn't" 1 microgram of mass?
Correct. It's too vague to make that kind of statement.