Can magnetic fields affect the path of ultrasound traveling through the air?

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Offline mriver8

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As a medium? And if so in what ways? Can you give me some examples?

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Offline alancalverd

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No. Air is pretty much uninfluenced by magnetic fields. You can detect paramagnetism in liquid air but it's very, very weak.
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Offline chiralSPO

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Oxygen is paramagnetic, but I think you would need a VERY powerful magnet to produce noticeable effects on the air. Water has an electrostatic dipole moment, so its (gas phase) motion might have some degree of interaction with a powerful magnetic field, but I still don't think this could account for any action of a magnetic field on ultrasound in air...

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Offline mriver8

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Oxygen is paramagnetic, but I think you would need a VERY powerful magnet to produce noticeable effects on the air. Water has an electrostatic dipole moment, so its (gas phase) motion might have some degree of interaction with a powerful magnetic field, but I still don't think this could account for any action of a magnetic field on ultrasound in air...

I was looking at this and wondering if strong enough magnetic fields can manipulate sound waves.
http://archive.news.softpedia.com/news/Magnetic-Fields-Can-Be-Manipulated-with-Soundwaves-53402.shtml

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Offline chiralSPO

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I was looking at this and wondering if strong enough magnetic fields can manipulate sound waves.
http://archive.news.softpedia.com/news/Magnetic-Fields-Can-Be-Manipulated-with-Soundwaves-53402.shtml

If I read that correctly, the article isn't talking about sound waves in air, but in superconductors.

Magnetic fields definitely affect vibrations (sound) in conductive (and superconductive) media. A strong static magnetic field will dampen vibrations in a conductor. A strong oscillating magnetic field can induce vibrations in a conductor (this is how most speakers work).

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Offline mriver8

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Oxygen is paramagnetic, but I think you would need a VERY powerful magnet to produce noticeable effects on the air. Water has an electrostatic dipole moment, so its (gas phase) motion might have some degree of interaction with a powerful magnetic field, but I still don't think this could account for any action of a magnetic field on ultrasound in air...

Who can produce the most powerful magnetic fields on Earth the US Government?

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Offline mriver8

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And what about in a puddy or gel?

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Offline alancalverd

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You can get a colloidal suspension of iron particles in oil, that becomes rigid when you apply a magnetic field, so the speed of sound depends on field strength.

No reason to suspect governments can generate anything other than hot air and misery, but plenty of laboratories can produce a continuous 8T or more. Pulsed fields may be available up to 20T. 

 
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Offline Colin2B

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As a medium? And if so in what ways? Can you give me some examples?
Can't think of anything that hasn't been mentioned, you need a medium influenced by magnetic fields.
Can you give an idea of what you were hoping to do, perhaps there is an alternative.
Scanning ultrasound? Air traffic control for bats?  [:)]
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