Does Energy have gravity?

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Offline D

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Does Energy have gravity?
« on: 01/04/2016 22:26:35 »
Just curios if energy has gravity?

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Offline Bill S

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Re: Does Energy have gravity?
« Reply #1 on: 01/04/2016 22:47:56 »
Yes.  Keep in mind that energy and mass are interchangeable.  It is mass/energy that creates gravity, or curves spacetime; depending on how you want to interpret it.
There never was nothing.

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Offline jeffreyH

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Re: Does Energy have gravity?
« Reply #2 on: 01/04/2016 23:15:05 »
Does kinetic energy have gravity? It isn't the same as relativistic energy/mass.
Fixation on the Einstein papers is a good definition of OCD.

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Offline alancalverd

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Re: Does Energy have gravity?
« Reply #3 on: 02/04/2016 00:05:58 »
No. Energy is a quantity that is conserved in classical interactions. It has dimensions of force x distance. Gravity is a force - different dimensional content.
helping to stem the tide of ignorance

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Offline Bill S

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Re: Does Energy have gravity?
« Reply #4 on: 04/04/2016 13:26:10 »
Alan, was that "no" to Jeffrey's question, or to the OP question?
There never was nothing.

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Offline JoeBrown

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Re: Does Energy have gravity?
« Reply #5 on: 04/04/2016 14:57:01 »
if your going to tackle a question with relativity, you should first understand what relativity does,
what it answers and what it simply is not meant to answer.

Relativity doesn't answer why mass cannot reach light speed like photons, doesn't attempt to. It asserts it, w/out explaining.  Simply put, it's an understanding of nature w/out explanation, because the simple explanation requires it so, to be simple.  ( I like that.  I claim coinage. )

I don't believe your answer can be achieved using relativity, because of what it does and doesn't do.

I may be in the minority, so this may qualify as opinion, not fact.  I'm working on resolving that, with a paper the coin has been inserted into (slightly modified to fit form and function better).
« Last Edit: 04/04/2016 15:16:49 by JoeBrown »
Does everything simple always gotta be so complex?