What's your kitchen science?

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paul.fr

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What's your kitchen science?
« on: 07/03/2007 01:35:40 »
not sure if this is the right section for this topic, but here goes.

We all love the kitchen science part of the show, but what are your favourite kitchen science experiments? Either those featured on the show / podcast, or ones you have done yourself?

Why not post them here, and let us all enjoy the wonder of experimentation.

Just post the items you need, and how to conduct the experiment. Like the kitchen science on the show, please do not post what the final result is. That way we will not lose some of the enjoyment of conducting the experiment.

If a member is unsure of his/her results they could always pm the poster.


OK, here is a simple on to start thins off. I have already posted this somewhere, and there was some doubt as to whether it worked. so why not try for yourself and then post one of your own:

What you need

2 cups
about 15 copper coins
salt
a nail
and vinegar

What you do

place your copper coins in your cup and cover them with salt. Then pour in some of your vinegar, to about 1cm above the top coin.

leave for half to one hour, then drain the solution in to the other cup. At this point you will have shiny copper coins, but that is not the whole experiment.

With just the solution in the second cup, drop your nail in to it and wait another half to one hour.

What happens to the nail?

topic link

Why does vinegar make copper coins all pink and shiny? http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=6240.0
« Last Edit: 09/04/2008 14:44:37 by daveshorts »

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Offline neilep

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #1 on: 07/03/2007 01:56:46 »
What a wonderful idea Paul.

I will try this experiment and let you know the results in due course.

C'mon everybody...YAYYYYYYYYY !!


I love doing the old playing with cornstarch thing.



What you need

Cornstarch
Bowl
Water
Sense of fun




What you do.


Pour a cup or two (or more) of cornstarch into a bowl and add water till it becomes  quite gloopy...add the water a little at a time !!


When all is done, settle it in the bowl and you can handle it very easily nice and slow...it's sticky and slimy !

But what happens when you apply a sharp smack to the solution with the back of a spoon or the palm of your hand ?

topic link

quicksand http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=7379.0
a question for all you smart types http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=4767.0
« Last Edit: 21/05/2007 07:47:50 by paul.fr »
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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #2 on: 07/03/2007 03:41:49 »
We call It gack at the preschool it is really cool to play in even for adults like me... Really I am not an adult just a big kid!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline daveshorts

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #3 on: 07/03/2007 09:13:30 »
The copper one is cool, thanks paul, it might just end up on the show ;)

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #4 on: 07/03/2007 10:11:12 »
The copper one is cool, thanks paul, it might just end up on the show ;)

Thanks Dave.

On a previous podcast Chris was giving away a mud powered clock. Now i have no idea how that works, but it did remind me of another experiment.

What you need

A Lemon
A piece of copper wire, about 2 inches long
A paper clip
Yout Tongue

What you do

Push the piece of copper wire about half an inch in to one end of the lemon, then gently straighten out the paper clip and push it in to the lemon about one onch away from where you have stuck the copper wire.

Now stick you tongue on to both the free ends of the copper wire and the paper clip.

What happens?

topic link

Could we power cars and lorries with fruit-generated electricity? http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=7344.0
« Last Edit: 21/05/2007 07:49:40 by paul.fr »

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Offline neilep

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #5 on: 07/03/2007 16:24:14 »
Dem bones dem bone dem dry bones !!..laa dee daa dee daa !

What you Need

1 : Some well cleaned chicken bones with no stuff on them..just nice clean bones .

2: A week !

What You Do

Stick em in a jar and fill with white vinegar...leave for a week.
take em out...

What has happened to the bones ?

Men are the same as women, just inside out !

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #6 on: 08/03/2007 01:14:53 »
What you need

A fat/chunky felt tip pen
A woolen cloth or jumer
A plate
Salt and Papper


What you do

Sprinkle some salt an pepper on to the plate. Then get your woolen cloth or jumper and rub it very hard along your felt tip pen for about 1 minute.

stop rubbing, discard the cloth/jumper and move the pen slowly over the plate.

What happens?
« Last Edit: 08/03/2007 01:27:27 by paul.fr »

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #7 on: 10/03/2007 04:06:56 »
MY Guess depending on "What kind of a plate,ie paper plastic or glass, on corelle or other metalic plate," I expect to see static electricity, but that depends on the plate So tell me what Kind of plate so I can do this??

Wait a moment I just thought of something. It may just act like a magnet eh... Hummmmm I have to go try it!LOL Driving me crazy!
« Last Edit: 10/03/2007 18:36:44 by Karen W. »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #8 on: 10/03/2007 13:46:48 »
MY Guess depending on "What kind of a plate,ie paper plastic or glass, on corelle or other metalic plate," I expect to see static electricity, but that depends on the plate So tell me what Kind of plate so I can do this??

Hi Karen,

just an ordinary dinner or side plate will do.

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #9 on: 10/03/2007 14:16:33 »
What you need

A balloon
Your head
The kitchen sink!


What you do

Firstly, blow up the balloon. Then turn your cold tap on..just a little so you get a nice staedy thin stream of water going into the sink.

Then rub the balloon on your head or a wooly jumper for a minute or two.

now slowly move the balloon closer to the stream of water..but don't get too close as to wet your ballooon.

What happens to the water?
« Last Edit: 10/03/2007 17:04:47 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #10 on: 10/03/2007 17:27:22 »
Strictly for adults only

What you need


An empty cola can
A cooker/stove
Oven gloves
Water
Your kitchen sink


What you do

First, fill your sink with cold water. Then after drinking the cola fill the can with cold water and heat in on your cooker/stove.

When the water in the can is boiling, using your oven gloves, take the can and turn it upside down allowing the water to escape and put it in the cold water in your sink.

What happens?

Try repeating the experiment, with a fresh can, this time keeping most of the hot water in the can.

What if anything do you notice different to the first time?

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #11 on: 10/03/2007 18:41:52 »
What you need

A balloon
Your head
The kitchen sink!


What you do

Firstly, blow up the balloon. Then turn your cold tap on..just a little so you get a nice staedy thin stream of water going into the sink.

Then rub the balloon on your head or a wooly jumper for a minute or two.

now slowly move the balloon closer to the stream of water..but don't get too close as to wet your ballooon.

What happens to the water?
Perhaps it will become charged with electricity.. Have to try this one too!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #12 on: 10/03/2007 18:47:31 »

Perhaps it will become charged with electricity.. Have to try this one too!

Karen, make sure the mater is a slow steady continuous stream. not a fast flow of water, as you move the "charged " balloon closer to the stream of water watch the water not the balloon.

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Offline neilep

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #13 on: 10/03/2007 19:06:27 »
Magic Crystals !!

This is fun way to make crystal formations.

What You Need.

2 tbsp epsom salts
 1/2 cup water

What You Do.

Line a flat dish or the lid from a large jar with black Sugar paper (construction paper) squishing it securely onto the bottom. Dissolve the epsom salts in the water and pour a thin layer of this solution into the paper-lined dish. Now, leave it alone to allow the water to evaporate, undisturbed. This might take a day or so, depending on temperature and humidity. There should now be a beautiful formation of crystals visible on the paper.

Brilliant !!
Men are the same as women, just inside out !

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #14 on: 10/03/2007 19:16:59 »
Cool My kiddos will love that one!!! YAYYYY These will be cool at school Thanks Paul and Neil... YAYYYYYYYY!!!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #15 on: 11/03/2007 17:15:35 »
Here is one you can eat afterwards.....yummy.


What you need

carbonated soda, i prefer ice cream soda...
ice cream
two glasses


What you do

Put a scoop of ice cream into one glass. Pour some of the soda into the other.

now add some soda to the glass with the ice cream. Try to add the same amount of soda that you put into the other glass.
 
What happens?

Next, add a scoop of ice cream to the glass with the soda.

What happens this time?

once finished you can eat the contents of your glasses....lovely

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #16 on: 12/03/2007 09:38:33 »
Ever wondered, or been asked how a thermos flask works?

Ok, this is not so much an experiment, as a how to make...but you can use it to experiment with!

What you need

Two clear jars with screw on lids, one big enough for the other to sit inside.
A cork
Kitchen foil
Sticky tape


What you do

Wrap and tape securely two layers of the kitchen foli around the smaller jar, with the shiny side facing inwards. Pour some warm water in to the jar and screw the lid on.

Put the cork in the bottom of the larger jar, and stand the smaller jar on top of it and screw the lid on. You now have your own home made thermos flask.


Your turn Neil  [;D], come on Karen, you must have something to contribute. No matter how big or small, let us in on the things you do with the kiddies.
« Last Edit: 12/03/2007 09:42:04 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #17 on: 15/03/2007 09:56:39 »
Clouds


What you need

a clear two liter drink bottle with its lid
water
paper
a match or lighter


What you do

Remove the label/s from the bottle.

Standing the empty bottle upright, put about 1 inch of water in it. Screw the lid on and give it a good shake.

Cut a long thin strip of paper. thin enough so that it easily fits into the mouth of the bottle. Remove the lid from the bottleand carefully use the match or lighter to set the end of the paper strip on fire.

Give it a second to burn and then blow out the flame. When it is out you will see smoke rising from the burned paper.

Quickly stick the end of the paper into the bottle, so that a little smoke gets inside. Remove the paper and screw the lid on to the bottle.

Quickly out the burning paper and  squeeze the bottle very hard and quickly release it.

What do you see?

Now squeeze the bottle hard again, this time squeeze and release a couple of times in quick sucsesion.

Now what do you see

Repeat the squeezing and releasing until you get bored!


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ROBERT

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #18 on: 19/03/2007 15:09:29 »


If you place a cup of black coffee close to your washing machine
while it is spin-drying you will see a series of patterns like this one.

Use cold coffee to avoid burns.
Only fill the cup 2/3rds full, not to the brim as shown here, to avoid spillage.
You may need to hold the cup down, or fix it with blue-tak, to stop it moving.
« Last Edit: 21/03/2007 16:54:39 by ROBERT »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #19 on: 21/03/2007 18:35:29 »
Nice pretty patterns, thanks Robert.

here is one for you to do with the kiddies at school, Karen.

Pretty mushroom pictures

What you need

A large mushroom
A black piece of card, bigger than the mushroom
A bowl, big enough to span the mushroom

What you do

Cut off the stalk, and put the mushroom face down on the centre of the card. Cover with the bowl and leave for a few days.
Note: some mushroon spores are not white, so you may need to use a different coloured piece of card depending on the colour of your mushrrom spores.

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #20 on: 21/03/2007 18:54:33 »
What you need

some water that has been cooled for a few hours.
hot water
food colouring
a glass or glass jar


What you do

Half fill the glass with hot water, add a few drops of food colouring and give it a good stir. Now add the cold water.

What happens?
« Last Edit: 21/03/2007 20:10:53 by paul.fr »

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #21 on: 22/03/2007 07:39:48 »
Cool I will try them with the children they can each do their own picture print with the mushrooms. Nice!!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #22 on: 22/03/2007 09:51:42 »
Here is the one you aked for, Karen.

What you need


Hot water
baking soda
Aluminium foil
a bowl
silver cutlery


What you do

Put a cup full of baking soda in to the bowl, and add six cups of hot water. Stir until tyhe baking soda is disolved, then add strips of the aluminium foil.

Put the cutlery in to the bowl, after a few minutes remove the silver cutlery and give it a good rinse. then a nice little polish.

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #23 on: 22/03/2007 20:16:42 »
What you need

a dark room
a stsndard "white" light bulb
a red light bulb
any other coloured bulbs you have or can get
a white wall or large sheet of white paper
two lamps
the bulbs should be the same wattage.


What you do


First, shine the white light onto the white wall. Put your hand in between the light and the wall and look carefully at the shadow. See if you can make a shadow that looks like a bird, or whatever shadow shpe you can make. The shadows look normal, dark areas on the white wall.

Turn off the white light and turn on the red one. Try making shadow pictures again. It works pretty much the same, except that now the wall looks red instead of white. The shadows are still dark. With the two lights about a foot apart, turn on both lights. With both lights shining on the wall, it will probably look white. The white light tends to overpower the red. Place your hand to make a shadow again.


you now have two two shadows, one from each light. One shadow will be red. The other shadow is ?

If you managed to get hold of different coloured light bulbs, replace the red bulb with your different coloured bulb. what do you see now?


If you do not have two lams, you could always use two torces. Just make sure the are on "flood" and not a concentrated "spot", you can easily make coloured filters for your torch.



The following information is supplied by George, another_someone, and may help you if you want to make filter for your lamp if you can not find different coloured bulbs.

Probably the simplest improvised filters you can produce for lighting would be coloured acetate sheets (but they are likely to be very uncalibrated in their colour, and you will have to make sure they do not get too hot).

Another option for creating colour is not to use direct filters that allow transmitted light of a given colour, but to use coloured reflectors that reflect the colour you want onto the subject (you will have to make sure that you block off any direct light between the source and the subject, and that the subject is only illuminated by reflected light).

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #24 on: 23/03/2007 02:45:54 »
COOL THANKS PAUL! I AM GOING TO TRY THEM!!!! SOUNDS FUN< THE KIDS WOULD LOVE THE SHADOW ONE> WE DID A SHEET WITH ALL THE LIGHTS OFF AND LET THEM MAKE SHADOWS> THIS COULD BE REALLY COOL IF WE PLAN IT RIGHT! THANK YOU THANK YOU THANKYOU!!!! FUNNNN!!!!YAYYYYYYYYYYYY!!!!!!!!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline neilep

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #25 on: 23/03/2007 14:45:49 »
What you need.

A few Eggs , Strawberries (or any other soft fruit)
A mallet


What you do


Place the eggs and fruit on the kitchen table
making sure all are around to view the results.

Apply a sharp thwack to the eggs and fruit.


What happens ?


Men are the same as women, just inside out !

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #26 on: 23/03/2007 15:51:49 »
LOL... I can imagine The looks on your childrens faces as you perform this experiment!! LOL

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #27 on: 23/03/2007 22:43:11 »
What you need


Lemon juice
cotton bud/s
absorbant paper/kitchen roll
an iron


What you do

Dip the cotton bud in to the lemon juice and make some pretty picture or just writing on the paper/kitchen roll. when finished leave your paper/kitchen roll to fully dry for 10 to 15 minutes.

You don't want to soak the paper/roll.

Now run your hot iron over the paper/kitchen roll.

What happens?


you can try it with other things, such as cabbage juice
« Last Edit: 24/03/2007 07:01:00 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #28 on: 24/03/2007 08:03:48 »
Are you hot enough!


What you need

Tap water
Rubbing alcohol
Clear, narrow-necked plastic bottle
Food colouring
Clear plastic drinking straw
Modeling clay


What you do

Pour equal parts of tap water and rubbing alcohol into the bottle, filling about a quater hight.

Add a couple of drops of food colouring and mix.Put the straw in the bottle, but don't let the straw touch the bottom.

Use the modeling clay to seal the neck of the bottle, so the straw stays in place and hold your hands around the bottle.

What happens?

Warning: Do not drink the contents of the bottle, supervise any children.
« Last Edit: 24/03/2007 08:06:16 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #29 on: 25/03/2007 00:01:02 »
Electrolosis

What you need


A 9 volt battery
Two pencils
Salt
Thin cardboard
Electrical wire
Small glass
Water


What you do


Sharpen each pencil at both ends.
Cut the cardboard to fit over glass.
Push the two pencils into the cardboard, about an inch apart.
   
Dissolve about a teaspoon of salt into the warm water and let sit for a while.

Using one piece of the electrical wire, connect one end on the positive side of the battery and the other to the lead at the top of the sharpened pencil. Do the same for the negative side connecting it to the second pencil top.

Place the other two ends of the pencil into the salted water.

What do you see, and why?
 
« Last Edit: 25/03/2007 00:14:21 by paul.fr »

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Offline mhorton

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #30 on: 26/03/2007 07:27:59 »
What you need:

Plastic overhead transparency sheet (acetates)
Scissors
Dishwashing liquid
Bowl of water

Cut the transparency sheet into small boats with a channel coming out of the rear of the boat.

Float the plastic boat in a bowl of water and let it set until the water is still.

Place a single drop of liquid soap in the channel of the boat.

What happens?

Very cool.  There are several very reasonable explanations for this, but the most common involves surface tension.
 

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Offline mhorton

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #31 on: 26/03/2007 07:33:34 »
What you need:

A roll of transparent tape
A dark room (optional)

Peel off a piece of transparent tape approximately 4 cm long and hand it to an assistant.

Peel off another piece of transparent tape approsimately 4 cm long.

Bring the two pieces of tape near each other.  What happens?

Stick a 4 cm piece of tape flat onto the surface of a table.  Fold over the end so that you can lift it off the table later.

Stick another 4 cm piece of tape on top of the first.  Fold over the end so that it can be lifted up.

Quickly lift the top piece of tape and hand it to an assistant.

Quickly lift the bottom piece of tape.

Bring the pieces of tape near each other.  What happens?

In a dark room after your eyes have adjusted to the darkness, quickly pull some transparent tape off of the roll.  What happens?

Hints: Static electricity, unlikes attract, likes repel.
 

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Offline daveshorts

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #32 on: 26/03/2007 11:22:47 »
Be careful when electrolysing salt, as you will generate chlorine, which whilst will probably mostly dissolve, was used as a chemical weapon...

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #33 on: 27/03/2007 06:03:49 »
following on from the experiment posted by mhorton, a similar one was done on the naked science show using a matchstick. Here is another variation.


What you need

a bowl
milk
3 or more different food colourings
liquid soap/washing-up liquid
a toothpick


What you do

pour some milk in your bowl, and put some of the food colouring in the milk.

take your toothpick and dip it in the liquid soap/washing up liquid, then dap the toothpick in the centre of the bowl

topic link

Surface Tension !..what is it ? http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=4710.0
« Last Edit: 21/05/2007 07:58:51 by paul.fr »

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #34 on: 28/03/2007 10:06:40 »
CD LOVE

1 new blank CD
1 microwave
five seconds on the microwave insert cd into microwave close door! LOL
Press start and watch closely!

when microwave stops remove cd and examine...

BTW It did not damage my Microwave!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #35 on: 28/03/2007 20:33:47 »
Three for the price of one!


What you need

three eggs.
five glasses
vinegar
corn syrup
water
3 days!


What you do

Put the three eggs in to the seperate glasses, and fill the glass with vinegar. Wait two or three days!

What do you notice?.....the egg has no shell!  Why?

Experiment one

Take one of your eggs, feels strange. now try dropping it from a few inches high on to your work surface, what happens? repeat with increasing height until you, A, get bored or B have a smashed egg.

Experiment Two

Take one of the other eggs and put it in an empty glass, fill the glass with water. What happens?

Experiment three

Take the last egg. put it in your remaining empty glass and fill with corn syrup. what happens?
« Last Edit: 29/03/2007 10:51:38 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #36 on: 28/03/2007 22:08:58 »
What you need

a candle
matches or a lighter
several balloons
water


What you do

Blow up one of the balloons and tie it off. Light the candle.  Carefully, hold the balloon just at the top of the candle
flame.

What happens? you guessed it, the balloon burst.

Carefully stretch the mouth of the other balloon over a tap( american: water faucet) and slowly fill the balloon with water. Then blow in a little air and tie it off.

Once again, light the candle, and hold the balloon over the candle, just at the top of the flame.

What happens this time?


Please use caution when using candles
« Last Edit: 29/03/2007 10:53:12 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #37 on: 28/03/2007 22:19:59 »
What you need

Glass bottle. One with a short neck works best.
A medium-sized balloon with the neck of the balloon cut off just below the opening
A large bowl
Water



What you do

Fill the glass bottle with warm-to-hot water and Let it sit for about 3 minutes so the bottle warms up. Then Pour cold water into the bowl until itís about 3/4 full.

empty the warm water out of the bottleand Stretch the balloon over the top of the bottle.
Put the bottle into the bowl of water.

What happens?

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Offline WylieE

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #38 on: 29/03/2007 02:17:19 »
What you need:
A rubber band- a good thick one works better, but any one will do

What to do:
Hold the rubber band with both hands.
Put it up to your lips or forehead and feel the temperature.
Now stretch it out.  Now quickly put it up to your lips or forehead again- is there a change in temperature?  Now let it relax and check the temperature again. 

What's going on?
Check out this thread:
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=6955.0

Colleen

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #39 on: 31/03/2007 11:54:15 »
What you need

Soda water/fizzy water
empty bottle or glass
rasins

What you do

Fill the glass or bottle half full with soda water. Drop three or four raisins into the water.
wait a while.

what happens?

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #40 on: 31/03/2007 11:58:51 »
an old favourite

What you need

A narrow necked glass bottle
3 matches
a peeled, hard bolied egg

What you do

Drop three lit matches into the glass bottle. Quickly put the hard-boiled egg on the mouth of the bottle.

What happens?

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #41 on: 31/03/2007 17:49:08 »
HEE HEE HEE! That one is also my favorite, I have a question about the results of this one. I have done it several times..and each time am at a loss for retrieving my lunch from the bottle, LOL Can one reverse the process Paul? LOL

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #42 on: 31/03/2007 17:52:46 »
I also have a question if one pierced an egg before cooking and did this same experiment, would the suction be strong enough to pull the yolk from the shell leaving the shell whole. You know like when you blow the contents out?

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #43 on: 31/03/2007 17:58:16 »
May be i should have included that  [:I]

Turn the the bottle upside-down, Put the bottle over the top of your head, like you are leaning you head back and looking up at the bottle.

Wit the bottle about half and inch from your mouth, blow into the bottle hard, and don't stop. The egg should come out.

or you can heat the bottle under warm water and the egg will come out.
« Last Edit: 31/03/2007 18:02:49 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #44 on: 31/03/2007 18:27:26 »
I also have a question if one pierced an egg before cooking and did this same experiment, would the suction be strong enough to pull the yolk from the shell leaving the shell whole. You know like when you blow the contents out?

I like that, give it a try and let me know would you?

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #45 on: 31/03/2007 18:48:27 »
May be i should have included that  [:I]

Turn the the bottle upside-down, Put the bottle over the top of your head, like you are leaning you head back and looking up at the bottle.

Wit the bottle about half and inch from your mouth, blow into the bottle hard, and don't stop. The egg should come out.

or you can heat the bottle under warm water and the egg will come out.


LOL LOL.. HEE HEE HEE!!  I don't know if I have enough air to continuely blow like that, BUT Paul, I think you should try it, but shouldn't you be "SUCKING" instead of blowing??? Will the egg really come out if you are blowing! LOL

So you never tried the other one.. HUMMMMM I will have to try it out and see!!!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #46 on: 31/03/2007 19:07:15 »

shouldn't you be "SUCKING" instead of blowing??? ! LOL


No, it's all to do with air pressure. If you don't have the lungs for blowing you could always use a hairdryer. or, add about an inch of water to the bottle and break up an alka seltzer tablet/bicarbonate of soda . Put the tablet in the bottle then turn the bottle upside down. The pressure from the expanding gas should blow the egg out of the bottle.

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #47 on: 31/03/2007 19:18:20 »
 OH that is interesting, I guess me brain doesn't work like that, cause that never occured to me. HMMMMM I will try it next time!

I could try the hair dryer that might do it! we will see!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #48 on: 01/04/2007 23:58:57 »
Found this one on the net. similar to one done by Dave


What you need

water
a squirt of dishwashing liquid
1/2 a teaspoon of salt
1 teaspoon of ice cold ethanol or methylated spirits or rubbing alcohol (isopropanol)
two cups and
a clear container with a lid


What you do

1.Dissolve half a teaspoon of salt in half a cup of water. Add a squirt of dishwashing liquid. This liquid will be used to break up the cells and release the DNA.

2.Take about a tablespoon (20 - 25 mls) of plain water into your mouth. Don't swallow! Swish the water around your cheeks vigorously for about 30 seconds. This removes some cheek cells. Spit the water into a clean cup or glass.

3.Add about 1 teaspoon (5 mls) of this fluid to a small clean container with a lid (a 20 ml test-tube or a clear plastic film canister would work). Add about half a teaspoon (2.5 mls) of the salt/dishwashing liquid (saline/detergent) solution. Put the cap on the container and tip it up and down gently 3 or 4 times to mix (but you don't want a lot of froth so don't shake it). This will break up the many hundreds of cheek cells, releasing the DNA from the nucleus.

4.Gently run a teaspoonful of ice-cold ethanol into the tube. Methanol or rubbing alcohol - isopropanol - should also work; make sure they are ice cold by placing the bottle in the freezer for a few hours before the experiment. Watch the point where the two layers meet. You may see strands of DNA forming, as cloudy filaments stretching up into the top (ethanol) layer. DNA is not soluble in ethanol, so when the ethanol meets the DNA solution it starts to precipitate (form a DNA salt).

5.You may be able to hook out the strands of DNA with a glass hook (or one made from a plastic twist-tie) by slowly dipping up and down through the two layers. If this doesn't work, gently invert the tube several times until the alcohol is mixed in. The precipitated DNA will look like a small ball of white thread.

topic link

HOW IS DNA SEPARATED FOR DNA FINGERPRINTING? http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=5889.0
An excellent experiment by Daveshorts (Dave Ansell) http://www.chaosscience.org.uk/pub/public_html//article.php?story=20050524184709373
« Last Edit: 21/05/2007 08:06:41 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #49 on: 02/04/2007 00:36:11 »
An easy one, to confuse the kids with.

What you need

A small apple or orange
a piece of paper


What you do

Hold the apple/orange and the paper at the same height from the ground and drop them at the same time.

Which hits the ground first? yes the apple/orange

Now scrunch the paper into a round ball the same size as the apple/orasnge and repeat dropping them from the same height.

Which hit the ground first this time?