nerve damage

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Offline eneville

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nerve damage
« on: 05/04/2004 22:45:18 »
i fractured right arm three weeks ago in three places. had an operation and a metal plate put in. informed nerve damage had occured. arm in cast and splint on lower half of my arm to keep fingers active. can`t bend fingers upwards. is this normal. what exercises can be done to help movement of fingers. how long take to heal in total...

enda neville
enda neville

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Offline chris

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Re: nerve damage
« Reply #1 on: 06/04/2004 09:39:27 »
It sounds as though you may have damaged your radial nerve. What's the sensation like over the patch of skin between the base of the thumb and the index finger on the back of your hand (i.e. not the palmar surface) ?

Chris

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Offline bezoar

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Re: nerve damage
« Reply #2 on: 07/04/2004 00:57:26 »
I work for a plastic surgeon who is a certified hand surgeon.  A nerve stimulator might help.  Then again, he said that nerve regeneration takes time -- up to six months.  In some cases, even as long as two years later there is some improvement.
 

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Offline OldMan

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Re: nerve damage
« Reply #3 on: 07/04/2004 03:58:50 »
Bezoar is a nerve stimulator one of those devices which makes your muscles pulse around like crazy? How likely is this sort of device to help with nerve damage? I was told with my shoulder it will be about 2 years before I will really know if it will improve and possibly 4 for complete recovery if I'm lucky and do recover that well.
Tim

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Offline bezoar

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Re: nerve damage
« Reply #4 on: 11/04/2004 23:00:20 »
Don't know, cause I've never seen one applied in our office.  They usually go to the hand therapist for that.  I think it's supposed to stimulate the growth of neurons, in hopes that the ends find one another.  Obviously, the more "wiring" that gets repaired, the better the sensation.
 

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Offline chris

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Re: nerve damage
« Reply #5 on: 06/04/2004 09:39:27 »
It sounds as though you may have damaged your radial nerve. What's the sensation like over the patch of skin between the base of the thumb and the index finger on the back of your hand (i.e. not the palmar surface) ?

Chris

"I never forget a face, but in your case I'll make an exception"
 - Groucho Marx
I never forget a face, but in your case I'll make an exception - Groucho Marx

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Offline bezoar

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Re: nerve damage
« Reply #6 on: 07/04/2004 00:57:26 »
I work for a plastic surgeon who is a certified hand surgeon.  A nerve stimulator might help.  Then again, he said that nerve regeneration takes time -- up to six months.  In some cases, even as long as two years later there is some improvement.
 

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Offline OldMan

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Re: nerve damage
« Reply #7 on: 07/04/2004 03:58:50 »
Bezoar is a nerve stimulator one of those devices which makes your muscles pulse around like crazy? How likely is this sort of device to help with nerve damage? I was told with my shoulder it will be about 2 years before I will really know if it will improve and possibly 4 for complete recovery if I'm lucky and do recover that well.
Tim

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Offline bezoar

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Re: nerve damage
« Reply #8 on: 11/04/2004 23:00:20 »
Don't know, cause I've never seen one applied in our office.  They usually go to the hand therapist for that.  I think it's supposed to stimulate the growth of neurons, in hopes that the ends find one another.  Obviously, the more "wiring" that gets repaired, the better the sensation.