how much weight can a helium filled balloon lift?

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paul.fr

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assuming it is a standard sized, party balloon. how much weight can one lift, and how many would it take to lift a car from the ground?

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Offline eric l

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how much weight can a helium filled balloon lift?
« Reply #1 on: 07/06/2007 11:16:00 »
A helium filled balloon would lift about 1.25 g per litre volume (for the balloon), but this would include the weight of the balloon. 
A filled balloon would measure about 5 litre, counting its own weight and that of the string you use for attaching the object in question, it would lift about 5 g.
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Offline daveshorts

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how much weight can a helium filled balloon lift?
« Reply #2 on: 07/06/2007 17:49:54 »
so about 200 000 would be needed to lift a tonne of car

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Online syhprum

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how much weight can a helium filled balloon lift?
« Reply #3 on: 07/06/2007 21:07:12 »
I am afraid if you purchased what are normally sold as 'Helium filled toy balloons' you  would need a lot more as what you get is a mixture of cheap Nitrogen and expensive Helium just sufficient to make it buoyant.
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Offline eric l

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how much weight can a helium filled balloon lift?
« Reply #4 on: 10/06/2007 18:45:20 »
And think about the amount of string you would need to tie the balloons to the car, and the weight of that.
"Wonder is no wonder" (Simon Stevin 1548-1620)

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Offline Bored chemist

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how much weight can a helium filled balloon lift?
« Reply #5 on: 10/06/2007 20:22:12 »
I had heard that so called helium balloons were filled with a mixture of hydrogen and helium. Hydrogen is much cheaper than helium but pure hydrogen is far too flammable.
Since helium is not a renewable resource, perhaps we ought to be pleased that people are reducing consumption this way.
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