Science Photo of the Week

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Offline neilep

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In the Shadow of Saturn

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Image Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASA


BIGGY PICCY HERE

 In the shadow of Saturn, unexpected wonders appear. The robotic Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn drifted in giant planet's shadow for about 12 hours in 2006 and looked back toward the eclipsed Sun. Cassini saw a view unlike any other. First, the night side of Saturn is seen to be partly lit by light reflected from its own majestic ring system. Next, the rings themselves appear dark when silhouetted against Saturn, but quite bright when viewed away from Saturn, slightly scattering sunlight, in this exaggerated color image. Saturn's rings light up so much that new rings were discovered, although they are hard to see in the image. Seen in spectacular detail, however, is Saturn's E ring, the ring created by the newly discovered ice-fountains of the moon Enceladus and the outermost ring visible above. Far in the distance, at the left, just above the bright main rings, is the almost ignorable pale blue dot of Earth.
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Offline neilep

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Great Orion Nebulae







Image Credit & Copyright: Jesús Vargas (Astrogades) & Maritxu Poyal (Maritxu)

BIGGY PICCY HERE

 The Great Nebula in Orion, also known as M42, is one of the most famous nebulas in the sky. The star forming region's glowing gas clouds and hot young stars are on the right in this sharp and colorful image that includes the smaller nebula M43 near center and dusty, bluish reflection nebulae NGC 1977 and friends on the left. Located at the edge of an otherwise invisible giant molecular cloud complex, these eye-catching nebulae represent only a small fraction of this galactic neighborhood's wealth of interstellar material. Within the well-studied stellar nursery, astronomers have also identified what appear to be numerous infant planetary systems. The gorgeous skyscape spans nearly two degrees or about 45 light-years at the Orion Nebula's estimated distance of 1,500 light-years.
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Offline harleywilliams

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This is really very nice forum to know lot's of information and also to learn...............

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Offline neilep

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Undulatus Asperatus Clouds



Photographer: Luis Argerich;
Summary Author: Luis Argerich; Jim Foster




The photo above shows unusual looking clouds looming over a lagoon near Lobos, Argentina. This formation appeared, oddly enough, following a morning storm. The clouds are referred to as undulatus asperatus, a recently introduced cloud designation (2009). These roughened wave clouds may be related to a type of altostratus cloud -- altostratus undulatus. It seems that Undulatus asperatus have a predisposition to form before midday, over relatively flat terrain and after convective storms have passed by. Though these intriguing clouds made the sky look especially threatening, no precipitation or strong winds ensued. They persisted for several hours before finally dissipating.
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Offline neilep

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Cloudy Night of the Northern Lights

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Image Credit & Copyright: Fredrick Broms (Northern Lights Photography)

BIGGY PICCY HERE



 On September 26, a large solar coronal mass ejection smacked into planet Earth's magnetosphere producing a severe geomagnetic storm and wide spread auroras. Captured here near local midnight from Kvaløya island outside Tromsø in northern Norway, the intense auroral glow was framed by parting rain clouds. Tinted orange, the clouds are also in silhouette as the tops of the colorful shimmering curtains of northern lights extend well over 100 kilometers above the ground. Though the auroral rays are parallel, perspective makes them appear to radiate from a vanishing point at the zenith. Near the bottom of the scene, an even more distant Pleiades star cluster and bright planet Jupiter shine on this cloudy northern night.
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Offline neilep

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NGC 7635: The Bubble Nebula

[attachment=15396]



Image Credit & Copyright: Larry Van Vleet


It's the bubble versus the cloud. NGC 7635, the Bubble Nebula, is being pushed out by the stellar wind of massive central star BD+602522. Next door, though, lives a giant molecular cloud, visible to the right. At this place in space, an irresistible force meets an immovable object in an interesting way. The cloud is able to contain the expansion of the bubble gas, but gets blasted by the hot radiation from the bubble's central star. The radiation heats up dense regions of the molecular cloud causing it to glow. The Bubble Nebula, pictured above in scientifically mapped colors to bring up contrast, is about 10 light-years across and part of a much larger complex of stars and shells. The Bubble Nebula can be seen with a small telescope towards the constellation of the Queen of Aethiopia (Cassiopeia)
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Offline neilep

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Jupiter's Clouds from New Horizons



Image Credit: NASA, Johns Hopkins U. APL, SWRI






The New Horizons spacecraft took some stunning images of Jupiter on its way out to Pluto. Famous for its Great Red Spot, Jupiter is also known for its regular, equatorial cloud bands, visible through even modest sized telescopes. The above image, horizontally compressed, was taken in 2007 near Jupiter's terminator and shows the Jovian giant's wide diversity of cloud patterns. On the far left are clouds closest to Jupiter's South Pole. Here turbulent whirlpools and swirls are seen in a dark region, dubbed a belt, that rings the planet. Even light colored regions, called zones, show tremendous structure, complete with complex wave patterns. The energy that drives these waves surely comes from below. New Horizons is the fastest space probe ever launched, has now passed the orbits of Saturn and Uranus and is on track to reach Pluto in 2015.
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Offline ajimmyadams

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i like these kind of information because i am i science student i love the NASA researches!
thanks to all keep sharing!

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« Last Edit: 24/10/2011 17:02:44 by imatfaal »

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Scalloped Blue Ice


[attachment=15495]


Photographer: John Adam; John’s Web site
Summary Author: John Adam




The photo above shows a chunk of scalloped ice, about 65 ft (20 m) in width that broke off from the Sawyer Glacier near Tracy Arm Fjord in southeastern Alaska. Note the pure blue color emanating from within the “chasm.”  The mechanism responsible for producing this robin’s egg blue color, as well as the blue color in deep snow, is essentially the same as that giving deep water its blue color. The longer wavelengths (yellow and red light) present in the incident white sunlight are preferentially absorbed by ice crystals. As a result, what we see is what’s not absorbed -- reflected light that’s dominated by the green and blue portion of the spectrum. In general, the thicker the ice the greater the absorption, and thus the bluer the color. Though this color may look sky blue, Raleigh scattering causes the colors we see in the sky on a clear day, not absorption and reflection by air molecules.

The melting patterns on this medium sized iceberg look as if someone has scooped out the ice with a scallop shell. So-called "spontaneous pattern formation" is ubiquitous in nature. The particular mechanism inducing these undulations may involve local melting of parts of the surface, which grow locally as a result of a feedback mechanism. For example, perhaps there’s an initially small and shallow depression that creates a region of shadow, outside of which more melting occurs, changing the shadow boundary, and so on. Photo taken in June 2011.
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Offline neilep

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Orange Sun Scintillating



Image Credit & Copyright: Alan Friedman (Averted Imagination)

Nice biggy piccy HERE


 Our Sun is becoming a busy place. Taken just last week, the Sun was captured sporting numerous interesting features including one of the larger sunspot groups yet recorded: AR 1339 visible on the image right. Only last year, the Sun was emerging from an unusually quiet Solar Minimum that lasted for years. The above image was recorded in a single color of light called Hydrogen Alpha, inverted, and false colored. Spicules cover much of the Sun's face. The gradual brightening towards the Sun's edges is caused by increased absorption of relatively cool solar gas and called limb darkening. Just over the Sun's edges, several scintillating prominences protrude, while prominences on the Sun's face are seen as light streaks. Possibly the most visually interesting of all are the magnetically tangled active regions containing cool sunspots. As our Sun's magnetic field winds toward Solar Maximum over the next few years, increased activity will likely create times when the Sun's face is even more complex.
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Update of Jupiter's Europa: Massive Lake Verified Beneath Ice-Shrouded Surface


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Holding My Breath I Just Took This Above Real Bona-Fide Genuine Photo !  (see the effort I put in to serve ewe ?..and there wasn't even any motorway services on the way !!)

Data from a NASA planetary mission have provided scientists evidence of what appears to be a body of liquid water, equal in volume to the North American Great Lakes, beneath the icy surface of Jupiter's moon, Europa.

The data suggest there is significant exchange between Europa's icy shell and the ocean beneath. This information could bolster arguments that Europa's global subsurface ocean represents a potential habitat for life elsewhere in our solar system. The findings are published in the scientific journal Nature.

SOURCE: The Daily Galaxy
Other Sources: Tomato, mustard, sweet and sour and chilli
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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #611 on: 23/01/2012 00:55:48 »
Europe's Orbiting Observatories Capture Stunning New Images of the "Pillars of Creation"


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Nice super biggy piccy HERE

     

 

Two of the European Space Agency's (ESA) orbiting observatories have captured new and spectacular views of the gas pillars in the Eagle Nebula (M16) that were the subject of the iconic 1995 Hubble images dubbed "Pillars of Creation."

In 1995, the Hubble Space Telescope's 'Pillars of Creation' image of the Eagle Nebula became one of the most iconic images of the 20th century. Now, two of ESA's orbiting observatories --Stunning new Herschel and XMM-Newton-- have revealed new insights this enigmatic star-forming region.
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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #612 on: 23/01/2012 21:37:29 »
Sirius Twinkling

[attachment=15919]

Photographer: David Lynch
Summary Author: David Lynch


Twinkling is the rapid fluctuation in brightness and color of a star. It’s caused by slight changes in density of air pockets called “seeing cells” that move across the observer’s line of sight. Air’s refractive index is determined, in part, by its density. Such undulations cause slight, momentary defocusing of the starlight resulting in brightness changes, also called scintillation. In extreme cases, the star’s position hops around. Twinkling also produces rapid color changes because air is slightly dispersive, i.e. the index of refraction varies slightly with wavelength.

Both brightness and color twinkling are shown here in a five-second exposure of Sirius using a telephoto lens that was wiggled slightly during the exposure. As the star‘s twinkling image skated around the focal plane, it traced out graceful, colorful arcs, fading in some places, brightening in others.

Here scintillation and telescope jitter, the bane of astronomers everywhere, have been recast into a stunningly beautiful image. Image taken on January 4, 2012.
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Offline mike321

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #613 on: 29/01/2012 09:14:26 »
This is the pic of a spider trying to climb up a wall.
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #614 on: 16/02/2012 17:56:13 »
SPLIT SUNSET

[attachment=16009]



Photographer: Jim Grant
Summary Author: Dave Lynch; Jim Grant; Jim Foster


BIGGY PICCY HERE


This “split screen” sunset was snapped at Ponto Beach near Carlsbad in southern California on January 24, 2012. The scarlet-colored cirrus clouds on the right half of the photo could, under some circumstances, result from the fact that they're higher in the sky and are thus still picking up some of the Sun’s lingering rays. However, all the clouds look pretty much the same altitude here. It seems the only difference is that half the picture is conspicuously redder than the other half, but what could cause this? The reason has to do with shadowing. As illustrated in the diagram to the left, direct sunlight (reddened by increased path length) shines on some of the clouds but the shadow of the large cloud (white oval) prevents direct sunlight from reaching other clouds. Only blue skylight reaches the smaller clouds within the shadow, so they appear somewhat blue or gray. In essence, the bigger cloud casts a very large, dark crepuscular ray. Keep your eyes peeled to the sky – you never know what you might see.


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Offline CliffordK

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #615 on: 16/02/2012 19:41:20 »
"Residents of Tainan learned a lesson in whale biology after the decomposing remains of a 60-ton sperm whale exploded on a busy street, showering nearby cars and shops with blood and organs and stopping traffic for hours."

Source : MSNBC

[attachment=3410]

Links : Naked Scientists Radio Show coverage of this story 1st February 2004 http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/news/news/523/

It reminds me a bit of this, that I bumped into a few days ago.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Vmnq5dBF7Y

Where Oregon Highway officials got a reminder of Whale Physics.

Perhaps the officials in Tainan and Oregon should get together and compare notes.
« Last Edit: 30/11/2013 20:18:13 by CliffordK »

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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #616 on: 22/02/2012 10:23:39 »
A Sailing Stone in Death Valley



[attachment=16039]


Image Credit: Nathan Alexander, Wikipedia
 How did this big rock end up on this strange terrain? One of the more unusual places here on Earth occurs inside Death Valley, California, USA. There a dried lakebed named Racetrack Playa exists that is almost perfectly flat, with the odd exception of some very large stones, one of which is pictured above. Now the flatness and texture of large playa like Racetrack are fascinating but not scientifically puzzling -- they are caused by mud flowing, drying, and cracking after a heavy rain. Only recently, however, has a viable scientific hypothesis been given to explain how 300-kilogram sailing stones ended up near the middle of such a large flat surface. Unfortunately, as frequently happens in science, a seemingly surreal problem ends up having a relatively mundane solution. It turns out that high winds after a rain can push even heavy rocks across a temporarily slick lakebed.
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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #617 on: 22/02/2012 10:25:03 »
Anticrepuscular Rays Over Wyoming

[attachment=16041]

Image Credit & Copyright: Nate Cassell


 What's happening over the horizon? Although the scene may appear somehow supernatural, nothing more unusual is occurring than a setting Sun and some well placed clouds. Pictured above are anticrepuscular rays. To understand them, start by picturing common crepuscular rays that are seen any time that sunlight pours though scattered clouds. Now although sunlight indeed travels along straight lines, the projections of these lines onto the spherical sky are great circles. Therefore, the crepuscular rays from a setting (or rising) sun will appear to re-converge on the other side of the sky. At the anti-solar point 180 degrees around from the Sun, they are referred to as anticrepuscular rays. Pictured above is a particularly striking set of anticrepuscular rays photographed last month near Cheyenne, Wyoming, USA.
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Offline imatfaal

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #618 on: 23/02/2012 13:14:23 »
Nice picture Neil - Naked Astronomy dealt with crepuscular rays and their weird opposites a few podcasts ago
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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #619 on: 23/02/2012 18:10:53 »
Nice picture Neil - Naked Astronomy dealt with crepuscular rays and their weird opposites a few podcasts ago

Thanks chum !......I must catch up with the podcasts....
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Offline SeanB

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #620 on: 23/02/2012 19:24:10 »
Saw some lovely crepuscular rays this morning, on the way to work. Sunlight breaking through the heavy early morning cloud, before the wind came up and blew them away, only to be replaced with heavy rain now in the evening.

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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #621 on: 25/02/2012 05:16:29 »
Saw some lovely crepuscular rays this morning, on the way to work. Sunlight breaking through the heavy early morning cloud, before the wind came up and blew them away, only to be replaced with heavy rain now in the evening.

Shame ya couldn't snap a piccy !...

Lightning Display on Ikaria Island, Greece





Photographer: Chris Kotsiopoulos
Summary Author: Chris Kotsiopoulos


This 70-shot photo sequence shows a lightning display that occurred during a severe thunderstorm last summer on the island of Ikaria, Greece, near the southwestern coast of Turkey. The stormy weather actually developed during a photo session of the total lunar eclipse on June 15, 2011  To make this shot, the camera was set on a tripod taking 20-second exposures continuously. More than 100 lightning bolts were captured in this sequence, the majority of which were potent cloud-to-ground strikes.



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Offline SeanB

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #622 on: 25/02/2012 19:35:34 »
Sheepy, I was in moving traffic, and the camera was at work, with flat batteries.

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Offline CliffordK

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #623 on: 25/02/2012 23:37:59 »
Lightning Display on Ikaria Island, Greece

Is that Zeus taking revenge on the Greek Bankers and Politicians for mortgaging the Parthenon?

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #624 on: 26/02/2012 05:16:37 »
Sheepy, I was in moving traffic, and the camera was at work, with flat batteries.

This is why I keep an emergency easel , canvas and paints in the boot ! I'm sure the traffic behind ewe would have been happy to allow ewe the couple of hours to set up and paint away !  [;)]
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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #625 on: 26/02/2012 05:18:25 »
Lightning Display on Ikaria Island, Greece

Is that Zeus taking revenge on the Greek Bankers and Politicians for mortgaging the Parthenon?


Is this what happens when ewe don't keep up your repayments !...This must be happening quite frequently at the moment !
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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #626 on: 09/03/2012 18:07:20 »
NGC 1579: Trifid of the North




Image Credit & Copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, University of Arizona


 Colorful NGC 1579 resembles the better known Trifid Nebula, but lies much farther north in planet Earth's sky, in the heroic constellation Perseus. About 2,100 light-years away and 3 light-years across, NGC 1579 is, like the Trifid, a study in contrasting blue and red colors, with dark dust lanes prominent in the nebula's central regions. In both, dust reflects starlight to produce beautiful blue reflection nebulae. But unlike the Trifid, in NGC 1579 the reddish glow is not emission from clouds of glowing hydrogen gas excited by ultraviolet light from a nearby hot star. Instead, the dust in NGC 1579 drastically diminishes, reddens, and scatters the light from an embedded, extremely young, massive star, itself a strong emitter of the characteristic red hydrogen alpha light.
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Offline RD

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #627 on: 17/03/2012 12:56:06 »
oooh-rora

[attachment=16152]

Quote
Aurora Australis

This is one of a series of night time images photographed by one of the Expedition 29 crew members from the International Space Station. It features Aurora Australis, seen from a point over the southeast Tasman Sea near southern New Zealand.
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/multimedia/gallery/iss029e008433.html
« Last Edit: 18/03/2012 06:14:30 by RD »

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Offline chris

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #628 on: 24/03/2012 09:17:39 »
This (now bloated) possum broke into a bakery in Australia and ate too many pies, precluding escape from the pastry box...

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Offline RD

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #629 on: 24/03/2012 11:05:05 »
« Last Edit: 24/03/2012 11:07:56 by RD »

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Offline Don_1

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #630 on: 24/03/2012 11:16:52 »
Who ordered the possum pie?
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Offline RD

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #631 on: 25/03/2012 18:41:21 »
On second thoughts the jammed-in possom picture doesn’t look right:

the jam tarts are too neatly arranged: still in one layer and all the right way up.
It should be jammy chaos in the box if a rat-sized creature was stuck in there for a few hours.

The possom is uniformly less sharp than the rest of the scene, so possibly inserted by photoshop,
 (also its hind foot is very poorly defined).
 
Then entrance hole doesn’t look big enough even for a starvin’ possom to get in.
Would it even be possible to close the box with a creature that big in it ?

If bloated that could be due to it being an ex-possom.

[ PS the tart shown below looks like it has been cut-out and pasted-in ]
« Last Edit: 28/03/2012 08:29:15 by RD »

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Offline Geezer

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #632 on: 25/03/2012 18:55:50 »
If bloated that could be due to it being an ex-possom.

Maybe it's just playing possum.
 
(Cor! Wot's that orrible pong?)
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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #633 on: 30/03/2012 05:22:41 »
NASA Observes Antimatter Streaming from Thunderstorms on Earth


[attachment=16238]


 

             

"We see gamma-ray bursts, one of the most distant phenomena we know about in the Universe, we see bursts from soft gamma-ray repeaters in our galaxy, flashes of gamma rays from solar flares, our solar neighborhood -- and now we're also seeing gamma rays from thunderstorms right here on Earth,"  said Julie McEnery, Fermi project scientist at Nasa.

In 2011, the Fermi space telescope accidentally spotted thunderstorms on Earth producing beams of antimatter. Such storms have long been known to give rise to fleeting sparks of light called terrestrial gamma-ray flashes. But results from the Fermi telescope show they also give out streams of electrons and their antimatter counterparts, positrons.

It deepens a mystery about terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, or TGFs -- sparks of light that are estimated to occur 500 times a day in thunderstorms on Earth. They are a complex interplay of light and matter whose origin is poorly understood.

Thunderstorms are known to create tremendously high electric fields -- evidenced by lightning strikes. Electrons in storm regions are accelerated by the fields, reaching speeds near that of light and emitting high-energy light rays -- gamma rays -- as they are deflected by atoms and molecules they encounter.
These flashes are intense -- for a thousandth of a second, they can produce as many charged particles from one flash as are passing through the entire Earth's atmosphere from all other processes.

The Fermi space telescope is designed to capture gamma rays from all corners of the cosmos, and sports specific detectors for short bursts of gamma rays that both distant objects and TGFs can produce.

"One of the great things about the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor is that it detects flashes of gamma rays all across the cosmic scale," explained Julie McEnery.
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Offline CliffordK

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #634 on: 24/05/2012 07:10:06 »
I saw this clock today that I liked.
I don't know if the clock is real or not.


Deskarati Clock


The image apparently is the Large Hadron Collider seen here.



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Offline RD

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #635 on: 24/05/2012 07:56:50 »
an even geekier timepiece ...



[ if you haven't guessed the display is in binary ]
« Last Edit: 24/05/2012 07:58:38 by RD »

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Offline CliffordK

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #636 on: 24/05/2012 08:33:10 »
[ if you haven't guessed the display is in binary ]
Where are the DIP switches?

« Last Edit: 24/05/2012 08:35:13 by CliffordK »

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Offline francinefegles

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #637 on: 30/06/2012 08:21:04 »
We see gamma-ray bursts, one of the most distant phenomena we know about in the Universe, we see bursts from soft gamma-ray repeaters in our galaxy, flashes of gamma rays from solar flares, our solar neighborhood -- and now we're also seeing gamma rays from thunderstorms right here on Earth,"  said Julie McEnery, Fermi project scientist at Nasa.
spam

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Offline CliffordK

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #638 on: 30/06/2012 09:02:51 »
We see gamma-ray bursts, one of the most distant phenomena we know about in the Universe, we see bursts from soft gamma-ray repeaters in our galaxy, flashes of gamma rays from solar flares, our solar neighborhood -- and now we're also seeing gamma rays from thunderstorms right here on Earth,"  said Julie McEnery, Fermi project scientist at Nasa.
Antimatter (Positrons), and their gamma decomposition products have already been detected from terrestrial thunderstorms.

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #639 on: 15/08/2012 19:22:37 »
Curiosity to Earth: Look! Me on Mars
(Images: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

[attachment=16674]


Taking a great picture of yourself is never easy - even if you're a pioneering robot sophisticated enough to explore Mars for signs of alien life.

This incomplete self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars on 6 August, is a mosaic of eight images snapped by the rover's navigation cameras. Other on-board cameras will help capture rock textures, the chemical make-up of minerals and sweeping colour panoramas.

At the centre is the deck of the 1-tonne, SUV-sized rover, while top left shows its rear. The two wheels in the bottom left are on its right side, although the rover is staying put for now as it checks that its instruments are working properly and examines its surroundings . When it does start roving, it will begin the 6.5-kilometre journey to Aeolis Mons, a 5-kilometre-high mound thought to preserve a layered history of water on the Red Planet. This will be key to piecing together whether life existed or still exists there.

Bits of Martian gravel are visible on the deck, kicked up during the rover's dramatic arrival. Curiosity was lowered to the Martian surface on cords unspooled from the hovering Sky Crane unit - a nail-biting autonomous manoeuvre.

The rover is designed to explore for a minimum of two years, beaming back images as it goes. The colour image below, courtesy of its mast cameras, reveals a taste of what is to come on the road to Aeolis Mons: a gravelly surface that eventually gives way to a dark dune field.

SOURCE/CREDIT http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/shortsharpscience/2012/08/curiosity-to-earth-look-me-on.html
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #640 on: 22/08/2012 18:22:16 »
Nodosaur Footprint Found at Goddard Space Flight Center


[attachment=16728]
Photographer: Rebecca Roth, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
Summary Author: Jim Foster; Karl B. Hille, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center


Approximately 110 million years ago, a tank-sized dinosaur known as a Nodosaur was munching leaves on what is now the campus of Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Shown above at top is a single footprint (about 12 in or 30 cm across) from this behemoth’s back left foot discovered by local dinosaur tracker extraordinaire, Ray Stanford. Nodosaurs roamed over Maryland in the middle of the Cretaceous Period, occasionally leaving behind imprints in mud of their four-toed feet. These quadrupedal herbivores were well armed with knobby protrusions to help ward off the toothy meat eaters that had a taste for the soft flesh beneath their spiky nodes. It's quite an odd juxtaposition: while NASA astronomers at Goddard look skyward toward star systems millions of light years away, at their feet are footprints of creatures that lumbered across the lowlands millions of years ago.

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #641 on: 23/08/2012 18:11:17 »
Pileus Cloud Over Northern Georgia

[attachment=16732]
Photographer: Thomas Faber
Summary Author: Thomas Faber


This photo shows a building cumulonimbus cloud just north of Alpharetta, Georgia on the afternoon of July 12, 2012. The thunderstorm is displaying a prominent pileus cloud above it -- the smooth cloud with the fuzzy edges. Pileus clouds are accessory type clouds that form when a layer of humid air is pushed upward by strong updrafts in growing storms. This prominent pileus developed very quickly. When I first saw it, about a minute before this photo was taken, it exhibited only a single layer. But over the next minute or two, several additional layers became obvious. Note the faint iridescence about the lower left portion of the pileus cloud. A less conspicuous pileus is also visible just above the tree canopy at far left. Photo taken at 5:04 p.m.
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #642 on: 24/08/2012 17:41:00 »
Tasting the rainbow: The ants whose multi-coloured
abdomens show exactly what they've been eating



The saying 'you are what you eat' is true for these insects as stunning pictures show their abdomens changing colour as they sip on sugar drops.
Father of three Mohamed Babu set up the photographs after his wife, Shameem, showed him some ants had turned white after drinking spilt milk.
He gave the creatures the brightly coloured sugar drops and watched as their transparent stomachs matched the food they were eating.

[attachment=16744]
A good palette: Some of the ants even wandered from one colour to another, creating new combinations in their stomachs


Scientist Dr Babu, mixed the sugar drops with edible colours red, green, blue and yellow and placed them in his garden to attract the insects.
By placing them on a paraffin base the drops kept their shape when touched by the ants.
The 53-year-old discovered the ants preferred lighter colours such as yellow and green.
He said: 'The idea for the photograph came to me after my wife showed me some ants that turned white sipping the spilled milk drops on our kitchen counter.
'I shot the photo in my garden to take advantage of the natural lighting and set a paraffin sheet with coloured sugar drops near some ants.
'Even though I could get enough of a crowd within a few minutes, it required several retakes to have a shot up to my satisfaction.'

[attachment=16746]
Ring of colour: An ant's transparent abdomen shows the colour of the food they have eaten


Dr Babu, from Mysore, in South India said:  'As the ant's abdomen is semi-transparent, the ants gain the colours as they sip the liquid.
'The secret is the paraffin base, which prevents the drops collapsing when the ants touch them.
'I really toiled to get a photo. The crowd always used to become unmanageable within a few minutes and while I managed my camera with my right hand, my left hand was busy removing the extra ants.
'Once I lost the chance, I could only repeat it the next day.' he explained.
'Curiously, the ants preferred light colours, yellow and green. 
'The darker green and blue drops had no takers, till there was no space around the preferred yellow and green drops.
'So I put larger drops of yellow and green, and smaller red and blue, to get maximum saturation around all the colours.'

[attachment=16748]
Eating their greens: The ants seemed to prefer lighter colours such as greens and yellow to darker blues



SOURCE : DAILY MAIL
« Last Edit: 24/08/2012 17:48:47 by neilep »
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #643 on: 27/08/2012 00:56:02 »

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #644 on: 27/08/2012 01:26:46 »
Unseasonal but impressive ...
Snowflake_300um_LTSEM%2C_13368.jpg[/img]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Snowflake_300um_LTSEM,_13368.jpg
I think this is the source for the snowflake photo, although I don't see that exact one.
http://emu.arsusda.gov/snowsite/default.html

Anyway, there are quite a few interesting snowflakes.

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #645 on: 27/08/2012 10:46:33 »
High Speed Liquid and Bubble Photographs by Heinz Maier


Words By By Christopher on October 27, 2011

[attachment=16775]


It never ceases to amaze me: just when I think I’ve seen every possible permutation of an artform or technique—be it figurative sculpture, stop motion animation, or in this case, high speed photography—somebody comes along and manages to do something radically different. German photographer Heinz Maier says that he began taking photographs less than a year ago in late 2010. He claims to not know what direction he’s heading in just yet, right now he’s experimenting with macro photography, mostly insects, animals, and these delicate high speed water droplets. Personally, I think he’s found a great direction. There are so many things happening here to make these photographs simply outstanding: the lighting, the colors, the occasional use of symmetry in the reflection of water, let alone the skill of knowing how to use the camera itself. It’s hard to believe these aren’t digital. See much more of his work here.

   
By Christopher on October 27, 2011

SOURCE : COLOSSAL
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #646 on: 31/08/2012 15:04:26 »
NANO RACER !


[attachment=16801]


This is a picture of a nano-racecar made in 4 minutes using a 3D printer.

To put it in perspective, the size of this race car is about twice the width of human hair.



SOURCE: http://www.mobilemag.com/2012/03/13/nano-race-car-printed-in-3d-video/
« Last Edit: 31/08/2012 15:10:55 by neilep »
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Offline CliffordK

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #647 on: 31/08/2012 17:25:19 »
Neil,

I would imagine your car would have pretty good fuel efficiency. 
But, here in the USA, Horsepower is King....   
Any estimates of the total power output?

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #648 on: 04/09/2012 21:17:41 »
Neil,

I would imagine your car would have pretty good fuel efficiency. 
But, here in the USA, Horsepower is King....   
Any estimates of the total power output?

Yes Cliff...about 0.000000000000006 seahorsepower !!  [;)]
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #649 on: 04/09/2012 21:18:41 »
CHECK THIS OUT !!!


[attachment=16829]




Don't ask me what it is cos I dunno !!

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