Science Photo of the Week

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Offline peppercorn

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #650 on: 08/09/2012 23:05:25 »
Unusual atmospheric effect...
[attachment=16853]

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Offline RD

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #651 on: 09/09/2012 02:38:55 »
Unusual atmospheric effect...

which looks like a circumzenithal arc ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circumzenithal_arc
« Last Edit: 09/09/2012 02:41:28 by RD »

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Offline RD

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #652 on: 09/09/2012 02:49:39 »
Don't ask me what it is cos I dunno !!

a little bird tells me it's a dragonfly ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red-veined_darter

[ someone has cranked up the colour saturation to hallucinogenic levels in the version of the image you posted ]
« Last Edit: 09/09/2012 03:03:43 by RD »

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Offline peppercorn

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #653 on: 09/09/2012 10:07:20 »
Unusual atmospheric effect...

which looks like a circumzenithal arc ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circumzenithal_arc

Thanking you [:)]

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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #654 on: 09/09/2012 10:24:33 »
Tauba Auerbach’s RGB Colorspace Atlas Depicts Every Color Imaginable



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The RGB Colorspace Atlas by New York-based artist Tauba Auerbach is a massive tome containing digital offset prints of every variation of RGB color possible. For you designers, think of it as a three-dimensional version of a Photoshop color picker. At 8in. x 8in x 8in. the perfectly cube book was co-designed by Daniel E. Kelm and bound with assistance from Leah Hughes. What a beautiful sculptural object.


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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #655 on: 10/09/2012 01:54:00 »
TRANQUILLITYITE, A LUNAR MINERAL, FOUND IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA

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During the days of the Apollo moon programme, hundreds of kilograms of rock samples were taken back to Earth by astronauts. Geologists studied these samples extensively and determined there were 3 minerals unique to the moon: armalcolite, pyroxferroite and tranquillityite. Tranquillityite was found in mare basalts collected during the Apollo 11 lunar mission to the Sea of Tranquillity in July 1969 (the mineral is named after the Sea of Tranquillity). Armalcolite and pyroxferroite have since been found on Earth’s surface but tranquillityite was only ever found in meteorite samples. That is, until now.

Birger Rasmussen, a palaeontologist at Curtin University in Perth led a team that has found natural samples of tranquillityite in several sites in Western Australia. The mineral has been found in six dolerite dikes and sills, in amounts so small that they are the width of a human hair and just 150 micrometres in length. Tranquillityite is comparatively delicate and tends to easily break down when exposed to normal surface climatic events (like heat, rain and wind). It develops during the late stages of crystallisation of molten rocks in oxygen-poor conditions.

The team had come across some interesting rocks that resembled the lunar rocks they had previously been studying. They subjected the sample to a blast of electrons; the trajectories of the blast are unique to each mineral. They found a perfect match to the lunar samples.

Tranquillityite [Fe2+8(ZrY)2Ti3Si3O24] is mostly made up of Si, Zr, Ti, and Fe, with minor Al, Mg, Mn, Ca, Nb, Hf, Y, and rare earth elements (REE). Before you get excited about mining prospects, know that it doesn’t seem to have much economical value. Using Uranium–lead (U–Pb) dating on tranquillityite from sills intruding the Eel Creek Formation, northeastern Pilbara Craton, gave a 207Pb/206Pb age of 1064 ± 14 Ma (1.064 billion years old). The mineral can give researchers insights into the age of other rocks in which it is found.

SOURCE: THE EARTH STORY
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #656 on: 10/09/2012 21:29:22 »
What could this possibly be? Yes, that's right. It's obviously a hummingbird's tongue!



[attachment=16877]




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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #657 on: 13/09/2012 05:30:02 »
RAINBOW CLOUD

The stunning image below is of a rainbow cloud, captured above Mt Everest by Oleg Bartunov whilst on an expedition in the Himalayas, Nepal.
The amazing rainbow effect is created when tiny ice crystals in the water vapour of the clouds reflect the sunlight.
The sight is rare and has only been reported a few times previously.

[attachment=16891]

Image credit: Oleg Bartunov
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #658 on: 13/09/2012 19:12:50 »
UNDERWATER PARK

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The lake looks unusual, in that it looks like an underwater park. That is because it is!

In the wintertime, the lake is almost nonexistent and the area is used as a park, which is a favourite among hikers.

In the springtime however, the ice and snow on the mountains melts, and this melt-water fills the basin below. The park is filled with this ice cold, almost crystal clear water. The lake looks green in colour due to the foliage beneath.

The water levels rise from about one or two metres deep in the winter to as much as 10 metres in the late spring and early summer.
The waters are at their highest in June when it becomes a mecca for divers keen to explore the rare phenomenon, before the waters recede at the end of July.





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Offline CliffordK

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #659 on: 13/09/2012 20:32:09 »
All they need would be a few underwater inhabitants for the underwater park.


National Geographic

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #660 on: 14/09/2012 05:37:09 »
All they need would be a few underwater inhabitants for the underwater park.

National Geographic

Agreed !!.....Oh Hang On !!...there's some statues there too !!
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #661 on: 17/09/2012 22:57:27 »
[attachment=16911]

This gorgeous creature is Chrysolina cerealis, also known as the rainbow leaf beetle. They're found throughout Eurasia, and are about 8mm long. Typically, the females are larger than the males.




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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #662 on: 17/09/2012 23:22:25 »
BRICK UPON AEROGEL

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This picture is of a 2.5kg brick supported by a piece of aerogel, the worlds lightest solid material. This particular piece weighs in with a mass of 2 grams.
Aerogel is nicknamed 'frozen smoke' or 'solid air', due to the fact that it is composed of 99.98% air by volume. Aerogels are a diverse class of amazing materials with properties unlike anything else known. They exhibit the lowest thermal conductivity of any known solid, and are the lowest density structural materials ever developed.
In spite of their name, aerogels are solids and not gels. The name is derived from the production process, the liquid component of a gel is extracted through supercritical drying. The first aerogels were produced from silica gels, but later work produced aerogels based on alumina, chromia and tin dioxide.


SOURCE: FACEBOOK  Clicking on this link takes you to a Facebook site dedicated to science and the name of the site contains and expletive that some users may find offensive. If you are offended by expletives please do not click on the link. You have been warned !
« Last Edit: 17/09/2012 23:27:19 by neilep »
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #663 on: 20/09/2012 12:31:37 »
Mysterious Underwater ‘Crop Circles’ Discovered Off the Coast of Japan

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According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration less than five percentof the world’s oceans have been explored, meaning that 95% of what lies deep underwater on Earth has yet to be seen by human eyes.
One person who has dedicated his life to uncovering the mysteries of the deep is Japanese photographer Yoji Ookata who obtained his scuba license at the age of 21 and has since spent the last 50 years exploring and documenting his discoveries off the coast of Japan. Recently while on a dive near Amami Oshima at the southern tip of the country, Ookata spotted something he had never encountered before: rippling geometric sand patterns nearly six feet in diameter almost 80 feet below sea level. He soon returned with colleagues and a television crew from the nature program NHK to document the origins what he dubbed the “mystery circle.”
Here is what they found.

[attachment=16935]


Using underwater cameras the team discovered the artist is a small puffer fish only a few inches in length that swims tirelessly through the day and night to create these vast organic sculptures using the gesture of a single fin. Through careful observation the team found the circles serve a variety of crucial ecological functions, the most important of which is to attract mates. Apparently the female fish are attracted to the hills and valleys within the sand and traverse them carefully to discover the male fish where the pair eventually lay eggs at the circle’s center, the grooves later acting as a natural buffer to ocean currents that protect the delicate offspring. Scientists also learned that the more ridges contained within the sculpture resulted in a much greater likelihood of the fish pairing.

[attachment=16937]


SOURCE: COLOSSAL
« Last Edit: 20/09/2012 12:33:50 by neilep »
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Offline RD

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #664 on: 20/09/2012 13:02:26 »
Snap ...

[attachment=16939]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05Io6lop3mk#t=2m22s


... Scientists also learned that the more ridges contained within the sculpture resulted in a much greater likelihood of the fish pairing.

The higher the frequency the more complex the pattern, so the amount of ridge patterns in a sand sculpture would demonstrate the fitness (strength/stamina) of the male who created it.
« Last Edit: 20/09/2012 13:29:31 by RD »

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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #665 on: 20/09/2012 13:40:58 »
Always impressed by RD's resourcefulness !

Wonderful similarities.....I'm sure I saw a snowflake like that last year too...I'll go see if I can find it !  [;)]
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Offline RD

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #666 on: 20/09/2012 15:48:41 »
...I'm sure I saw a snowflake like that last year too...I'll go see if I can find it !  [;)]

You won't find a snowflake with 20-something-fold radial symmetry like the above patterns : snowflakes only come in the 6-fold variety.

[ Hexagonal cymatic patterns are possible though ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCUg4Kx_CjY ]
« Last Edit: 20/09/2012 16:09:52 by RD »

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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #667 on: 20/09/2012 16:36:17 »
...I'm sure I saw a snowflake like that last year too...I'll go see if I can find it !  [;)]

You won't find a snowflake with 20-something-fold radial symmetry like the above patterns : snowflakes only come in the 6-fold variety.

[ Hexagonal cymatic patterns are possible though ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCUg4Kx_CjY ]

Ahhh....that explains it...it must have been 3 or 4 snowflakes overlapped then !
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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #668 on: 24/09/2012 18:27:29 »
Talk about adaptation! This impala from the Kruger National Park in South African is now a mobile home for a spider with the spider's web spun between the impala's two horns. The impala had the misfortune to walk into the spiders web, and it seems to have settled in for a permanent stay!


[attachment=16982]


SOURCE: https://www.facebook.com/evolutionarybiology
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Offline CliffordK

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #669 on: 25/09/2012 05:20:22 »
Talk about adaptation! This impala from the Kruger National Park in South African is now a mobile home for a spider with the spider's web spun between the impala's two horns. The impala had the misfortune to walk into the spiders web, and it seems to have settled in for a permanent stay!

I like that.
A mobile flytrap.
I think I need one of those for around the house.

We may see the evolution of a new species.  Perhaps a symbiotic relationship of keeping the bugs out of the impala's eyes, and the impalas bringing more food to the spiders.

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #670 on: 26/09/2012 11:42:26 »
Aerial Photographs of Volcanic Iceland by Andre Ermolaev
















At first glance these photos by Andre Ermolaev look like twisting abstract paintings, but in reality are aerial photos of rivers flowing through Iceland’s endless beds of volcanic ash. Given its name and stereotypical depiction it’s somewhat surprising to learn that the small country named after ice is home to no less than 30 active volcanic systems. You’ll remember the eruption of the massive Grímsvötn volcano just last year that spewed some 120 million tons of ash in the first 48 hours and snarled air traffic for days. Of his photographs Ermolaev says:

Quote
Iceland is a wonderful country; I would even say that it is a true paradise for all the photo shooting-lovers. But what has become a real discovery for me is the bird’s eye view of the rivers flowing along the black volcanic sand. It is an inexpressible combination of colors, lines, and patterns. The photo represents the mouth of the river falling into the ocean. [...] A little bit upstream there is a yellow-colored brook flowing into the river, but yellow currents fail to mix with the main water flow. One can estimate the scale judging by the car tracks that are clearly seen on the black sand. This is just a river, just a volcano, just our planet.


SOURCE: COLOSSAL
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Offline CliffordK

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #671 on: 07/10/2012 17:05:52 »


The latest product from France.
M&M colored Honey.

Unfortunately the bee keepers think it isn't sellable.  Apparently they haven't figured out the power of E-Bay and free web advertising.

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #672 on: 09/10/2012 10:42:55 »
DIFFERENT DENSITIES OF LIQUIDS






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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #673 on: 09/10/2012 10:46:59 »
Spider and wasp caught In Amber


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What you are seeing here is a small piece of natural history frozen in time. During the early Cretaceous period (between 97 and 100 million years ago), a juvenile orb-weaving spider (Geratonephila burmanica) was on its way down to a parasitic wasp (Cascoscelio incassus) that had been caught in its web. The wasp belonged to a group that are now known to parasitize spider eggs, so perhaps this wasp became trapped while searching for eggs.

Just as the spider walked up to the wasp, tree resin flowed down and engulfed both the predator and its prey, trapping them in exactly the moment before the spider began its meal. This is the first time such an attack has been preserved in amber, and it gives us a rare glimpse into the ecology of dinosaur-era insects.

What makes this fossil even more amazing is the presence of the web itself trapped in the amber, as well as a second adult male spider of the same species in the same web. This makes this the oldest evidence of social behavior in spiders, who normally prefer to live alone. Today, male social orb-weaving spiders tend to live on female-constructed webs, where they help capture prey and maintain the web.

Sources:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121008134523.htm
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/10/fossil-spider-attack/
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #674 on: 14/10/2012 05:48:41 »




















Glittering Metallic Ink Clouds Photographed by Albert Seveso

For this new series, Il Mattino ha l’oro in bocca, Seveso uses accents of metallic inks to accentuate the rolling plumes of color as they disperse underwater. All photos courtesy the artist.
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Offline RD

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #675 on: 14/10/2012 14:16:51 »
...it must have been 3 or 4 snowflakes overlapped then !

Quote
12-Sided Snowflakes

https://www.its.caltech.edu/~atomic/snowcrystals/class/class.htm

[ still not 20-something symmetry, or cymatic ]
« Last Edit: 14/10/2012 14:21:30 by RD »

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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #676 on: 18/10/2012 23:04:21 »
The worlds smallest periodic table - etched on to a single human hair.

[attachment=17155]


Watch the video at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQU2IAsQak8

Photograph courtesy of www.periodicvideos.com/
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #677 on: 16/11/2012 01:54:22 »
This is what happens when sand gets struck by lightning!

[attachment=17252]

Fulgurites are natural hollow glass tubes formed in quartzose sand, silica, or soil by lightning strikes (at 3,270 °F), which instantaneously melts silica on a conductive surface and fuses grains together over a period of around one second.


Photographed by Ken Smith.
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #678 on: 17/11/2012 17:45:09 »
STRIPED ICEBERG

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In Antarctica icebergs aren’t always monotone white, surprisingly they can appear striped too, making for a pretty view. Different colours can indicate different conditions including where the iceberg has been. Blue stripes indicate a layer of melt water was present that very quickly refroze not allowing any bubbles to form. Brown, black and yellow stripes can show that the iceberg has picked up various types of sediments during formation, which can take hundreds of thousands of years. A green stripe can form after the iceberg has broken off and come in contact with algae rich seawater.

-Matt J

Photo taken by Oyvind Tangen several 100km north of Antarctica
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #679 on: 17/11/2012 17:53:08 »
Bioluminescent Mushrooms!

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Only 71 species of mushrooms are known as bioluminescent, of an incredible million estimated species, both known and unknown. Although they make for some classically cool photography, scientists are still theorizing as to the ecological purpose behind the glowing fungi. Other bioluminescent species use their brightly lit selves as a way to attract mates, lure prey, and camouflage themselves (counterillumintation), among other reasons. Leading theories suggest that the mushrooms would benefit from attracting insects to disperse their spores, or from attracting insects to eat other bugs that munch on the mushrooms. Even though you’re not too likely to find some glowing mushrooms growing naturally in your backyard, if awesome pictures aren’t enough for you, “grow your own” bioluminescent mushroom kits are sold from many companies online.

-BN

P.S.A- Many mushrooms are poisonous, and many more cause adverse (although not deadly) reactions from eating. Be cautious in your adventuring!

Photo Credit: Cassius V. Stevani, Institute of Chemistry, University of São Paulo via NSF. http://www.nsf.gov/discoveries/disc_images.jsp?cntn_id=112030&org=NSF

Further Resources:
http://species.asu.edu/2011_species02
http://blog.mycology.cornell.edu/2010/04/12/this-bark-glows-in-the-dark-bioluminescence-in-mushrooms/
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #680 on: 27/11/2012 05:30:48 »
[attachment=17295]


This small waterfall located in the Shale Creek Preserve along a section of the Chestnut Ridge Park, near Buffalo New York has a rather interesting phenomena associated with it. The aptly named “Eternal Flame Falls” sits on a pocket of natural methane gas, which seeps out through a fracture in the rocks behind the waterfall.

Unfortunately weather conditions or lack of methane escaping can put the flame out now and then (perhaps not quite eternal) but it doesn’t take long before the locals or a visitor relights the flame once again. No one is quite sure who first discovered the fracture and set fire to it first.

-Matt J

Photo by Carl Crumley
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #681 on: 04/12/2012 13:23:47 »
STALACTITE CROSS SECTION:
[attachment=17322]
Photographer: David Lynch; Dave's Web site
Summary Author: David Lynch


Stalactites are a type of dripstone formed when water carrying dissolved calcium bicarbonate [Ca(HCO3)2] drips from the ceiling of a limestone cave. As the water evaporates, calcite [CaCO3] is deposited as slender, hollow cylinders that grow lengthwise in time. These are called “soda straws,” one of many speleothems, or geologic cave formations. Water flowing down the outside of the soda straw also deposits calcite, and the formation grows outward layer-by-layer, somewhat analogous to tree rings. The graceful beauty of stalactites gives no hint as to what's found inside them.

I discovered this stalactite already broken, lying on the floor of a cave in southern Indiana in 1969. Cutting and polishing it revealed the delicate growth rings. Each layer is a slightly different color as the mineral content of the water changed over time. This stalactite started out as two soda straws, and then merged into one stalactite. Photo taken in Topanga, California on November 22, 2012.
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Offline Mazurka

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #682 on: 05/12/2012 09:29:10 »
Loving the Fulgurite, thanks sheepy!

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #683 on: 06/12/2012 05:24:10 »
 
Loving the Fulgurite, thanks sheepy!

 [:)]

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #684 on: 08/12/2012 19:33:53 »
SADDLEBACK CATERPILLAR


[attachment=17332]


Meet the saddleback caterpillar: The fleshy horns that sit puffy-piggy-tail-like at each end of the body are covered in hairs that secrete venom. Brushing up against them causes pain as strong as that from a bee sting, swelling, nausea and a rash that will last for several days.
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #685 on: 10/12/2012 21:27:42 »
Barchan Sand Dunes

[attachment=17334]
Image; George Steinmetz

These Barchan sand dunes are located within the Afar depression (part of the East African rift system). The dunes are located on an ancient seafloor, and have been formed over many years of continual East-West wind flow. They slowly migrate across the ancient seafloor, rising around 2m into the air and can be up to 10m across.

Barchan dunes are defined as arc-shaped, and contain well-sorted, mature sand grains. In the geological record, finding these dunes can lead to all sorts of interesting information being gathered about the ancient system, as the two "horns" found either side of the dune will always face down wind.

Barchans can "join" with other Barchan dunes, growing and growing until they form ridges that can extend for hundreds of kilometres.

Aside from the Afar Depression, other spectacular examples include La Joya in Peru, and Parangkusumo Beach in Indonesia; the dunes of Parangkusumo are comprised of volcanic sands that have their origin in Mt Merapi, and have taken thousands of years to form and migrate.

Barchan sand dunes have also been found on Mars, giving clues to the systems operating on the Red Planet.

-LL

Links;
http://geography.about.com/od/physicalgeography/a/sanddunes.htm
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap120422.html
http://www-f1.ijs.si/~rudi/sola/Sem4.pdf
Image; George Steinmetz
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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #686 on: 14/12/2012 11:11:46 »
Geyser Pool, Afar Depression.


[attachment=17336]


The image above shows a geyser pool; located slightly north west of Lake Abbe in the Afar Depression, part of the East African Rift system.

The water in the pools is heated to boiling from geothermal activity; steam can be seen in the image. This geothermal activity is associated with the opening of a new ocean as part of the rift system.

The East African Rift Valley is one of only two places in the world, the other being Iceland, where mid ocean ridge process can be studied on land. This makes the Afar Depression and the rift system a paradise for geologists.
-LL

Image: George Steinmetz
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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #687 on: 24/12/2012 13:44:36 »
Frost Sparkles





Photographer: Jan Koeman; Jan's Web site
Summary Authors: Jan Koeman; Jim Foster


The photo above shows frost crystals gleaming like the bulbs on a Christmas tree in the early morning sunlight. It was taken in the Lofoten Islands of Norway on October 15, 2012. I used a long 300 mm lens with full aperture to snap the picture. These were the first such crystals of the autumn. The brightly coloured spheres are referred to as sparkles. Like halos, they tend to be found roughly 22 degrees from the Sun. It's easier to notice the sparkle colours if you purposely de-focus your vision or if you stand further away. This allows only a fraction of the dispersed sunlight to enter your eyes. If you stand too close, the crystals will appear devoid of colour. Photo taken on October 15, 2012.
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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #688 on: 29/12/2012 13:12:46 »
View from Inside Antelope Slot Canyon
[attachment=17352]
Photographer: Bret Webster
Summary Authors: Bret Webster; Jim Foster


The photo above shows a view from inside of Antelope Slot Canyon, Arizona, looking up and out. A shaft of sunlight illuminates its corkscrew interior. At this location in the sinuous canyon the distance from the bottom to the top is about 33 ft (10 m). Antelope Canyon snakes through Navajo sandstone, across the high desert of far northern Arizona, for roughly 5 mi ( 8 km). It’s the most visited and the most photographed slot canyon in the U.S. Photo taken in summer 2012.
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Offline shivangigarg004

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #689 on: 03/05/2013 15:16:03 »
Bioluminescent Mushrooms!

[attachment=17267]


Only 71 species of mushrooms are known as bioluminescent, of an incredible million estimated species, both known and unknown. Although they make for some classically cool photography, scientists are still theorizing as to the ecological purpose behind the glowing fungi. Other bioluminescent species use their brightly lit selves as a way to attract mates, lure prey, and camouflage themselves (counterillumintation), among other reasons. Leading theories suggest that the mushrooms would benefit from attracting insects to disperse their spores, or from attracting insects to eat other bugs that munch on the mushrooms. Even though you’re not too likely to find some glowing mushrooms growing naturally in your backyard, if awesome pictures aren’t enough for you, “grow your own” bioluminescent mushroom kits are sold from many companies online.

-BN

P.S.A- Many mushrooms are poisonous, and many more cause adverse (although not deadly) reactions from eating. Be cautious in your adventuring!

Photo Credit: Cassius V. Stevani, Institute of Chemistry, University of São Paulo via NSF. http://www.nsf.gov/discoveries/disc_images.jsp?cntn_id=112030&org=NSF

Further Resources:
http://species.asu.edu/2011_species02
http://blog.mycology.cornell.edu/2010/04/12/this-bark-glows-in-the-dark-bioluminescence-in-mushrooms/
:)  :)  :D

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Offline shivangigarg004

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #690 on: 03/05/2013 15:17:43 »
Frost Sparkles





Photographer: Jan Koeman; Jan's Web site
Summary Authors: Jan Koeman; Jim Foster


The photo above shows frost crystals gleaming like the bulbs on a Christmas tree in the early morning sunlight. It was taken in the Lofoten Islands of Norway on October 15, 2012. I used a long 300 mm lens with full aperture to snap the picture. These were the first such crystals of the autumn. The brightly coloured spheres are referred to as sparkles. Like halos, they tend to be found roughly 22 degrees from the Sun. It's easier to notice the sparkle colours if you purposely de-focus your vision or if you stand further away. This allows only a fraction of the dispersed sunlight to enter your eyes. If you stand too close, the crystals will appear devoid of colour. Photo taken on October 15, 2012.

 :) nice... :)

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Offline gusnd

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A Graceful Arc
Credit & Copyright: Tony Hallas


[attachment=10945]

BIG PICCY HERE (It's worth it !)

 The graceful arc of the Milky Way begins and ends at two mountain peaks in this solemn night sky panorama. Created from a 24 frame mosaic, exposures tracking Earth and sky were made separately, with northern California's Mount Lassen at the left and Mount Shasta at the far right, just below the star and dust clouds of the galactic center. Lassen and Shasta are volcanoes in the Cascade Mountain Range of North America, an arc of the volcanic Pacific Ring of Fire. In the dim, snow-capped peaks, planet Earth seems to echo the subtle glow of the Milky Way's own faint, unresolved starlight.

Hi

I'd like to see this with my own eyes, what time of the year is the best for this sight seeing and what do I need to get there? Just a back pack and foot?

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Offline RD

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #692 on: 08/08/2013 01:11:27 »
I'd like to see this with my own eyes, what time of the year is the best for this sight seeing and what do I need to get there? Just a back pack and foot?

It doesn't actually look like that: to the naked eye the milky way is faint and not a rainbow-like arc.
A long photographic exposure (tens of seconds) and a 360o camera were required for these type of images ... http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070508.html
« Last Edit: 08/08/2013 06:00:26 by RD »

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Offline CliffordK

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #693 on: 08/08/2013 14:19:43 »
Many of the better modern star photos use digitally enhanced false colors.  In part this must be done to extend the color range into the IR which would otherwise be invisible to the naked eye.  But, looking up into the sky, your view will be far more black and white rather than the pretty purples and reds.

Nonetheless, one of the best ways to be awed by the stars is to plan a camping trip to coincide with a new moon.  Best yet, plan a backpacking trip to take yourself as far from the beaten path as possible.

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Offline RD

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #694 on: 26/10/2013 07:12:19 »
Quote
[attachment=18054]

Master of Disguise - Photograph and caption by Graham McGeorge, National Geographic Your Shot - Eastern Screech Owls like to take over woodpecker nests that have been dug out over the years in pine trees, which are the main species of tree at this swamp. Fish and Wildlife also paint a white ring around the base of a tree that has active nests in order to avoid when conducting controlled burns. Screech owls can range in height anywhere from 8-10 inches, so you have to have a sharp eye to find these little birds of prey.
http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/traveler-magazine/photo-contest/2013/entries/gallery/winners-winners/
« Last Edit: 26/10/2013 07:14:52 by RD »

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Offline RD

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« Last Edit: 06/11/2013 13:20:15 by RD »

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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #696 on: 26/09/2014 18:13:58 »
Coronas Around the Moon as Observed from Thessaloniki, Greece


[attachment=19147]

Photographer: Kallias Ioanndis; Kallias' Web site
Summary Authors: Kallias Ioanndis; Jim Foster

The photo above shows colorful concentric rings, coronas, about the nearly full Moon as observed from Thessaloniki, Greece, on May 12, 2014. These colorful rings result from diffraction of sunlight by randomly spaced water droplets in mid-level clouds. When the droplets are of uniform sizes, multiple rings may be observed, as was the case on this spring evening -- look to the right of the Moon. Note also the pale aureole surrounding the lunar disk.
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Offline neilep

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Methane Ignition, Alaska
« Reply #697 on: 26/09/2014 19:19:43 »
Methane Ignition, Alaska
Photograph by Mark Thiessen, National Geographic


[attachment=19153]


Methane is bubbling from lakes all over the warming Arctic. Here ecologist Katey Walter Anthony (at right) ignites a large bubble that was trapped by the fall freeze—then freed by an ice pick.

CREDIT http://photography.nationalgeographic.com/photography/photo-of-the-day/methane-alaska-thiessen/
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Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #698 on: 26/09/2014 19:28:22 »
Butterfly Egg


[attachment=19155]

Photograph by Martin Oeggerli, National Geographic



Dryas iulia
Perched on the tendril of a Passiflora plant, the egg of the Julia heliconian butterfly may be safe from hungry ants. This species lays its eggs almost exclusively on this plant's twisted vines.

CREDIT: National Geographic
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Offline emmanuelle07

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #699 on: 21/01/2015 03:54:41 »
« Last Edit: 23/01/2015 09:09:23 by emmanuelle07 »