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Author Topic: Is this freezing microwave science fiction?  (Read 3752 times)

Offline mashger

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Is this freezing microwave science fiction?
« on: 17/12/2012 07:52:14 »
Is this real ? or not ? The  video is real , if the content is  ....
« Last Edit: 19/12/2012 15:08:22 by chris »


 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: FREEZING MICROWAVE : scince fiction or not ?
« Reply #1 on: 17/12/2012 08:45:51 »
My vote is that it is a fake. 
We did discuss cooling microwaves on TNS a few times in the past.

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=33018.0
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=44782.0

And a summary here:
http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2009-12/can-microwave-technology-be-used-make-food-cold

There are cooling lasers, but they are only effective with a small number of atoms.

Damocles  came up with a solution to another youtube video about instant freezing here.
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=41442.msg369138#msg369138

If one uses supercooled sodium thiosulfate as suggested by Damocles, it may be transparent to the microwave (and thus absorbs very little microwave energy).  Although he suggested hydrated, so it may absorb some microwave energy.  Or, perhaps the microwave is broken or on its lowest setting.  The microwave could provide agitation to improve the nucleation.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: FREEZING MICROWAVE : scince fiction or not ?
« Reply #2 on: 17/12/2012 10:42:57 »
Just fiction I think. Not much science involved.
Ice doesn't absorb microwaves much so if you (secretly) have a glass of ice hidden in the oven  then put in a glass of water zap it for a while, then take the glass of ice out you get a video like this.
Quite imaginative; and, to be fair, I guess using the µwave transparency of ice to achieve the effect is sort of science.
 

Offline mashger

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Re: FREEZING MICROWAVE : scince fiction or not ?
« Reply #3 on: 17/12/2012 11:28:47 »
O.K.  ...... this liquid isn't water  ....   
 

Offline lightarrow

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Re: FREEZING MICROWAVE : scince fiction or not ?
« Reply #4 on: 17/12/2012 15:47:07 »
and what about supercooled water? Maybe the simple slight vibrations generated inside the oven can start the solidification.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: FREEZING MICROWAVE : scince fiction or not ?
« Reply #5 on: 17/12/2012 18:56:59 »
Ice doesn't absorb microwaves much so if you (secretly) have a glass of ice hidden in the oven  then put in a glass of water zap it for a while, then take the glass of ice out you get a video like this.

The film never quite shows the right rear of the microwave.  There doesn't seem to be any reason that a straight-in view was not used...  unless something was hidden.

The time being entered is not shown, but one can see him pressing 36 on the keypad. Shortly after starting the microwave, 35 seconds left is visible...  What an odd selection of time...  Unless the person empirically determined that 36 seconds, or so, was required for the turntable to arrive in the exact right position.
 

Offline JP

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Re: FREEZING MICROWAVE : scince fiction or not ?
« Reply #6 on: 17/12/2012 22:28:54 »
I thought that, too, Clifford, but when he puts the water in and pulls the ice out, it's from the front center of the microwave.  I don't see how rotation could hide the water in the back right while simultaneously moving the ice that was initially back there to the front.

Clever video editing could.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: FREEZING MICROWAVE : scince fiction or not ?
« Reply #7 on: 18/12/2012 03:57:46 »
The initial view of the inside of the microwave obscures slightly under half of the inside of the microwave.  A cup could easily be hidden, unseen in the back, even slightly more than 180° from the cup being placed in the front of the microwave.

The final view of the microwave shows about 1/3 of the back panel of the microwave, so a second cup would have to be at slightly less than the 180° position.

Anyway, timing, view angles, and cup locations would have to be fairly precise, but swapping positions with a rotary table would be the easiest solution.  I'm not sure of the table speed, if it only made 1/2 turn in 30 seconds, then one could build a cup catcher for the second cup.  If it makes a couple of revolutions, then catching the second cup would be more complex.

Anyway, precise cup & camera positioning with one cup of ice and one of liquid water would be easier (but, perhaps less fun) than using an exotic supercooled liquid resembling water.
 

Offline syhprum

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Re: FREEZING MICROWAVE : scince fiction or not ?
« Reply #8 on: 18/12/2012 20:20:57 »
These TV programs detailed how similar and more spectacular illusion's are created

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breaking_the_Magicians%27_Code:_Magic%27s_Biggest_Secrets_Finally_Revealed
 

Offline UltimateTheory

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Re: Is this freezing microwave science fiction?
« Reply #9 on: 29/12/2012 08:27:45 »
Somebody making this movie didn't prove it's still fully working microwave device. It was microwave. But it could be simply changed - microwaves turned off.
Super cold water until you shake it can be still liquid. After shaking it's immediately changing to ice.
Device is rotating cup of water and thus shaking and causing crystallization.

That's the simplest answer.
« Last Edit: 29/12/2012 08:29:19 by UltimateTheory »
 

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Re: Is this freezing microwave science fiction?
« Reply #9 on: 29/12/2012 08:27:45 »

 

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