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Offline stana

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What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« on: 06/06/2007 16:14:30 »
Anyone know some VERY hard, or even unanswerd chemisty questions?

thanks
« Last Edit: 13/06/2007 08:51:48 by chris »


 

Offline rosy

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Re: What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #1 on: 06/06/2007 16:48:22 »
Yes.
Why does water behave so differently from other solvents?
(OK, there are answers to that. Lots of them. But we don't know which is right...)
There are lots. That's why such a lot of people are employed to investigate them (we're called chemists...)
 

Offline stana

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Re: What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #2 on: 06/06/2007 17:00:57 »
thanks

any others? [:)
 

Offline lightarrow

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Re: What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #3 on: 06/06/2007 20:56:46 »
thanks

any others? [:)
Is cold fusion really possible? If yes, how?
 

Offline Cut Chemist

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Re: What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #4 on: 07/06/2007 04:47:56 »
That's a good one lightarrow.

Here's a website for "Cold Fusion Times"
http://world.std.com/~mica/cftsci.html

It's not a very well known journal but it sites many references.  Sorry, I don't really understand much of the chemistry, but I'm not sure many people do.  That's probably why we aren't using cold fusion right now.
 

Offline Cut Chemist

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Re: What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #5 on: 07/06/2007 06:22:03 »
Most of the unanswered chemistry questions of today are sooo..extremely specific, that not many people would understand them unless they were an expert in that specific area of chemistry.  This is probably true for most of the sciences today.

Think about it... Research is going on every day at every university around the globe, and every research professor has his (or her) own unanswered questions that he (or she) is trying to solve.  Some are more important than others, and some are more difficult to understand than others, but what is the point of research if you already know the answer???



This is probably not really the point of this forum, but here are some of the research topics that I have been turned on to recently.  Each poses its own series of unanswered questions.

-Developing applications of carbon nanotubes.  One application was in the textile industry trying to increase the flexibility and longevity of rubber in tires.

-Developing silicon dioxide nanotube "scrolls" for drug delivery as a type of micro-injectable syringe.  (If you attach antibodies, theoretically the drug would only reach its target.  The perfect "magic bullet.")

-Developing chemometric software that learns to use infrared or ultraviolet spectroscopy to detect blood type, infections, or other abnormalities in blood samples.  (They use crystals with a high refractive index so that the light doesn't even have to make contact with the blood.)

-Developing organic dyes that illuminate when they conduct electricity.  (Placing a circut board on the back will move us toward printed and flexible televisions and computer screens.)

-Using enzymes to perform stereospecific organic reactions.  (Using genetically modified aldolases to perform stereospecific aldol reactions.)     


P.S. If you'd rather have some VERY HARD chemistry test questions to try to answer, I'm sure I can dig some of those up too, just name the subject.  (I prefer Organic or Analytical Chemistry)
 

Offline stana

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Re: What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #6 on: 07/06/2007 16:30:44 »
cut chemist,
            Thanks for your reply, and yes i would like some VERY hard questions about..very hard stuff, see im trying to find a question that my science teacher cant answer, he answerd my one about cold fusion, and how water is wet. so i need something very complicated and hard. it can be as complicated as you want as ill print it off and show him it. thanks
 

Offline lightarrow

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Re: What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #7 on: 07/06/2007 18:31:08 »
cut chemist,
            Thanks for your reply, and yes i would like some VERY hard questions about..very hard stuff, see im trying to find a question that my science teacher cant answer, he answerd my one about cold fusion, and how water is wet. so i need something very complicated and hard. it can be as complicated as you want as ill print it off and show him it. thanks
Ask him to solve the Schrodinger equation for gold.
 

Online Bored chemist

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Re: What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #8 on: 07/06/2007 19:03:55 »
That's physics.
 

Offline Cut Chemist

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Re: What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #9 on: 07/06/2007 19:19:36 »
That's perfect!!!  A truly unanswerable question, however he probably knows that it can't be answered.

(It's part of quantum chemistry, and most universities require that class to graduate with a BS in chemistry.)
 

Offline lightarrow

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Re: What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #10 on: 07/06/2007 20:23:51 »
cut chemist,
            Thanks for your reply, and yes i would like some VERY hard questions about..very hard stuff, see im trying to find a question that my science teacher cant answer, he answerd my one about cold fusion, and how water is wet. so i need something very complicated and hard. it can be as complicated as you want as ill print it off and show him it. thanks

Ok, this is not probably as difficult as you're looking for, but It's undoubtly chemistry, and I don't know the answer, so if he answers he'll make me a favour:

How can you make pink (rose) crystals of Fe(NO3)3*9H2O?

The problem is that if you start from an acqueous solution of Fe3+ you don't get it, at least in my experience: Fe3+ seems to react irreversibly with water, unless in concentrated acid, but in this case, how can you get 9 water molecules for every Fe(NO3)3 molecule in the crystal?

I've never been able to make iron nitrate in that form.

Another strange thing: my Fe(NO3)3*9H2O crystals in their plastic container has changed with time (about 2 years) from rose to light violet. Why? (I have taken away just a very small amount of it, for experiments).
 

Offline Cut Chemist

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Re: What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #11 on: 08/06/2007 15:30:35 »
I believe iron(III) nitrate (nonahydrate) is deliquescent (extremely hygroscopic.)  Deliquescent salts absorb moisture from the air and eventually form a liquid solution.  (If you leave them on a benchtop they will form a puddle.)  It may have absorbed water the few times you opened it, and that might explain the color change. 

I'm not familiar with the synthesis but, if you make it in an aqueous solution, perhaps it is very hard to completely dry it to get the crystal form.  You would need either some heavy duty dessicants, freeze drying, or possibly baking. 
 

Offline stana

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Re: What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #12 on: 08/06/2007 17:19:17 »
cut chemist,
            Thanks for your reply, and yes i would like some VERY hard questions about..very hard stuff, see im trying to find a question that my science teacher cant answer, he answerd my one about cold fusion, and how water is wet. so i need something very complicated and hard. it can be as complicated as you want as ill print it off and show him it. thanks

Ok, this is not probably as difficult as you're looking for, but It's undoubtly chemistry, and I don't know the answer, so if he answers he'll make me a favour:

How can you make pink (rose) crystals of Fe(NO3)3*9H2O?

The problem is that if you start from an acqueous solution of Fe3+ you don't get it, at least in my experience: Fe3+ seems to react irreversibly with water, unless in concentrated acid, but in this case, how can you get 9 water molecules for every Fe(NO3)3 molecule in the crystal?

I've never been able to make iron nitrate in that form.

Another strange thing: my Fe(NO3)3*9H2O crystals in their plastic container has changed with time (about 2 years) from rose to light violet. Why? (I have taken away just a very small amount of it, for experiments).


Thanks. ill ask him first thing monday morning. knowing him, he will probably know the answer.

 

Offline lightarrow

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What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #13 on: 18/06/2007 15:17:45 »
cut chemist,
            Thanks for your reply, and yes i would like some VERY hard questions about..very hard stuff, see im trying to find a question that my science teacher cant answer, he answerd my one about cold fusion, and how water is wet. so i need something very complicated and hard. it can be as complicated as you want as ill print it off and show him it. thanks

Ok, this is not probably as difficult as you're looking for, but It's undoubtly chemistry, and I don't know the answer, so if he answers he'll make me a favour:

How can you make pink (rose) crystals of Fe(NO3)3*9H2O?

The problem is that if you start from an acqueous solution of Fe3+ you don't get it, at least in my experience: Fe3+ seems to react irreversibly with water, unless in concentrated acid, but in this case, how can you get 9 water molecules for every Fe(NO3)3 molecule in the crystal?

I've never been able to make iron nitrate in that form.

Another strange thing: my Fe(NO3)3*9H2O crystals in their plastic container has changed with time (about 2 years) from rose to light violet. Why? (I have taken away just a very small amount of it, for experiments).
Thanks. ill ask him first thing monday morning. knowing him, he will probably know the answer.

Stana, what has been his answer?
 

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What are chemistry's big unanswered questions?
« Reply #13 on: 18/06/2007 15:17:45 »

 

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