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Author Topic: Inventor of the Electric Chair  (Read 43683 times)

Offline Exodus

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Inventor of the Electric Chair
« on: 03/03/2003 11:55:02 »
I was intereseted to find out that the inventor of the electric chair was in fact a dentist!!! Dr. Albert Southwick. He apparently saw an elderly drunkered touch terminals of an electrical generator and was amazed at how quickly he died. [|)]

Edison was at the forefront of electricity at this time and began investigating currents, DC and AC and actually killed vast numbers of cats and dogs with a 1000 volt generator!!! he apparently lured them onto a metal plate. NICE!

In 1890 Edwin R. Davis, Auburn Prison electrician, designed an electric chair model which closely resembles our modern device, as well as elaborate testing procedures involving large slabs of meat.

for the full story see
www.ccadp.org/electricchair.htm


Thats Economics...


 

Offline Pappy

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #1 on: 30/10/2003 02:56:32 »
Seems fitting that a dentist would think of such a device. Probably had erotic visions of an electric dentist chair. Ah, the pain!
 

Offline chris

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #2 on: 30/10/2003 10:26:00 »
Sounds like a good alternative to me ! Also an incentive to pay the bloody bill. Also very good for dealing with compliance issues - "you will take better care of your teeth in future won't you...", said the dentist, his fingers lightly brushing the 'on' switch.

"I never forget a face, but in your case I'll make an exception"
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Offline Ians Daddy

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #3 on: 30/10/2003 14:38:42 »
Hahahaha.... sounds like a Hitchcock tale....I like it.
 

Offline tweener

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #4 on: 30/10/2003 16:17:35 »
Chris, sometimes you're scary.  Especially knowing that you are a doctor!


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John
 

Offline Donnah

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #5 on: 30/10/2003 22:04:47 »
Didn't you know that the real title of the story is Dr. Smith and Mr. Hyde? Mmmooooaaaaaaaaah!
 

Offline tweener

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #6 on: 31/10/2003 03:06:25 »
The truth is starting to dawn......

[:0]


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Offline bezoar

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #7 on: 31/10/2003 03:30:31 »
Why is it that it took so much more DC current than AC to kill the dog?  Why is the DC current less damaging?

Bezoar
 

Offline Ians Daddy

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #8 on: 31/10/2003 06:02:03 »
DC is direct current and AC is alternating current. DC just gives you a jolt as would licking a battery. It comes from one source. AC is from a "hot" and a "negative" and you become the ground. It turns you into an appliance. BBZZZZZT.
 

Offline Pappy

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #9 on: 31/10/2003 20:24:00 »
Chris may have a point once the victim, um patient, is in the chair. However, it may not be good for promoting return business. So, Chris, exactly what kind of doctor are you anyway..........the Dasterdly Dr. of Pain!!
 

Offline bezoar

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #10 on: 01/11/2003 00:22:46 »
So then AC current is hotter than DC?  And where's the ground for the DC and why don't you become the ground when you contact the DC current?

Bezoar
 

Offline Donnah

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #11 on: 01/11/2003 02:15:29 »
quote:
Originally posted by Ians Daddy

DC is direct current and AC is alternating current. DC just gives you a jolt as would licking a battery. It comes from one source. AC is from a "hot" and a "negative" and you become the ground. It turns you into an appliance. BBZZZZZT.



Chris' phrase "appliance of science" is plugged in once again.
« Last Edit: 01/11/2003 02:16:26 by Donnah »
 

Offline tweener

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #12 on: 01/11/2003 21:09:23 »
quote:
Originally posted by bezoar

So then AC current is hotter than DC?  And where's the ground for the DC and why don't you become the ground when you contact the DC current?

Bezoar



Actually, both AC and DC are "hot", and they both need a "ground", as in a complete circuit from the source through some load (in this case a body) and back to the source.  

AC is more deadly because the back and forth swings of the current interrupt the neronal circuit of the heart and induce fibrillation.  DC just flows through, creating some heat on the way, but it doesn't really affect the neurons except when it is first applied.

If I remember correctly, the most "effective" frequency to disrupt the working of the heart is about 58 Hz.  Amazingly close to the 60 Hz that we use here in the USA.  The standard is 50 Hz in Europe, so you guys are a little safer except that your voltage standard is 220 (instead of 120) so you get more punch for the same current.


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Offline Donnah

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #13 on: 02/11/2003 00:18:50 »
Who can explain ohms, amps and watts to me?
 

Offline roberth

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #14 on: 02/11/2003 22:12:19 »
The formula is W=V*A or watts=volts X amps. I think ohms are what people meditating say.
 

Offline Donnah

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #15 on: 02/11/2003 23:04:59 »
How do they function?
 

Offline roberth

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #16 on: 03/11/2003 05:12:11 »
They just sit down, cross legged and say "OOOOOOOHHHHHHHMMMMMMM".

On the power, ohms is a measure of resistance or conversely, conductivity, volts is the power supply level and amps is the power used to run an appliance. Therefore when you receive your power bill, they charge in KiloWatthours (KWh). This equates to power used over a period. In the US and Canada I think you run 110 V power. In Australia we run 240 V power. An appliance in Australia which runs at 10 amps would require 2400 watts (or use 2.4 KWh per hour) to operate. In the US this same appliance would run at 21 amps and still use 2.4 KWh per hour.
I hope this helps.
 

Offline Donnah

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #17 on: 03/11/2003 16:49:50 »
Roberth, thanks, it does help, and so does meditating when I'm trying to learn this.  

Looked up watt, which is measured using joules; looked up joules, which is measured using newtons; looked up newtons and here's what I don't get...
A newton is a metric unit of force required to impart an acceleration of 1 meter/second/second to a mass of 1 kg.  What's with the 2nd /second?  How does 1 meter/second differ from 1 meter/second/second?
« Last Edit: 03/11/2003 16:50:29 by Donnah »
 

Offline roberth

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #18 on: 03/11/2003 22:36:30 »
I guess it's probably the same as KWh per hour or KiloWatthour/hour. The metre per second is the measurement and the second second is the time. The second second may also be measured in minutes I guess, and the second second becomes the first minute.
 

Offline thedoc

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #19 on: 16/11/2003 22:21:10 »
Volts is actually joules per coulomb, and current is coulombs per second so power (watts) is J / C x C / s (cancel the coulombs) = J / s (joules per second). Hence power (Watts) is the rate of energy (J) delivery. Volts is how much energy is delivered per unit of current. So 1 amp of current from a 1.5 V battery delivers 1.5 watts (1.5 joules per second) hence it is non-lethal. But a 240 v supply delivers 240 joules per coulomb and hence at 1 amp current delivers 240 times more energy - not so good if you are part of the circuit.

Chris
 

Offline thedoc

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #20 on: 16/11/2003 22:26:48 »
quote:
Originally posted by Donnah

A newton is a metric unit of force required to impart an acceleration of 1 meter/second/second to a mass of 1 kg.  What's with the 2nd /second?  How does 1 meter/second differ from 1 meter/second/second?



Okay, force acts over time - if I push on something for a certain amount of time I am obviously going to impart more energy to it than if I push (by the same amount) but for a shorter period of time.

Whenever you push on something it tries to accelerate. The rate at which it accelerates - assuming zero loses - will be uniform for any given force - so the object in question might speed up by 10 metres per second. So obviously it now matters how long you apply the accelerating force to the object because that will determine its final speed. That's where the second "per second" comes in. So an acceleration of 10 metres/second/second means your object will accelerate by 10 metres per second, every second. So after 10 seconds of acceleration it will have accelerated by 100 metres per second.

Chris
 

Offline christianchick

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #21 on: 01/12/2003 15:57:20 »
He obviously wanted wanted to get back at somebody![:0]

blue
 

Offline ramku

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #22 on: 17/12/2003 00:07:47 »
I heard that Harold P. Brown invented electric chair for Edison co. He was an electrician before doing this.

 

Offline chris

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #23 on: 17/12/2003 17:21:23 »
Hi Ramku,

where did you hear that ? Exodus has written (above) that it was a dentist !

Perhaps there are several patents on electric chairs ?

Chris

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Offline Donnah

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #24 on: 17/12/2003 22:11:37 »
Brown seems an appropriate name.[}:)][:0]
 

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Re: Inventor of the Electric Chair
« Reply #24 on: 17/12/2003 22:11:37 »

 

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