What's your kitchen science?

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #100 on: 02/05/2007 21:25:56 »
what you need

video camera /mobile phone camera
remote control
dark room


what you do

take your video camera and remore control and sit in the dark room, wait afew minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark. Now your eyes have adjusted, press a button on your remote control. Do you see anything? Well, no.

Turn your video camera on. Whilst looking through the view finder, or the viewing screen on a new camera, point the remote control at your camera's lens.

what do you see?
« Last Edit: 21/05/2007 07:39:05 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #101 on: 05/05/2007 08:01:37 »
what you need

a bar of ivory soap
a microwave


what you do

place the bar of soap in your microwave and heat for two minutes. for some reason ivory soap works better than the rest, one note of caution. If you overheat the soap it will trigger your smoke alarm.

for a change i will now post what you should see:

after the two minutes, you soap should have expanded up to five times it's original size. like i said this works best with ivory soap. i have tried other soaps and it just melts and sets my smoke alarms off.

highly annoying since i did this at 7am, I'm sure the neighbours don't mind!  [:I]

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Offline daveshorts

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #102 on: 05/05/2007 08:59:32 »
It will also fill your microwave with soap flavoured smoke, and I would reccomend that you leave the door open for a while afterwards.

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #103 on: 06/05/2007 07:36:06 »
what you need

table tennis ball
bath


what you do

when you have finished bathing, take out the plug and throw the table tennis ball in to the bath.

what happens?
« Last Edit: 06/05/2007 11:56:33 by daveshorts »

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Offline Seany

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #104 on: 06/05/2007 17:33:04 »
It spins? Right..?
They say that when you die, your life flashes in front of you. Make it worth watching!


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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #105 on: 08/05/2007 14:55:41 »
what you need

a raw egg
a clear glass of hot water


what you do

Be sure to use a clear glass, so you can see what is happening. Fill the glass with hot water from your kitchen sink. We will put the egg into th water, so leave enough room so that the water does not overflow. Your main goal is to have enough hot water so that the egg will be completely under water.

Let the hot water sit for a few seconds, so that any air bubbles can float to the top. Carefully place the egg into the hot water. Watch for a minute.


What do you notice? What do you hear?


I should add a little not here, be careful when handling hot water.

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #106 on: 09/05/2007 02:31:29 »
Oh my, just short of 4,000 views! As a special treat, here is a bit of science, a trick to amase your friends and something to eat. All rolled in to one!!!


What you need


a banana with no brown spots.
some slivered almonds or other nuts
a candle holder
a lighter


what you do

Carefully peel the banana and cut a section about 3 or 4 inches long. You want it to be as straight as possible. You also want to be sure that it has no brown spots.What you are trying for is something that looks like a candle.

Once you have the length of banana, place it into the candle holder. Stick a thin sliver of almond into the top of the banana. it will only burn for a minute or so. That means you have to work quickly.

Once the candle is burning nicely, carry it carefully into the room where someone is sitting. As they watch you carrying your candle in, blow out the almond and bite some of the banana off!

there you go, the science is why the almond burned, the trick is your friends think you have just eaten a candle! and the something to eat........well, that's the banana.


One thing to be careful of is the hot end of the burned almond. It will cool quickly, but I always make sure I have plenty of saliva (spit) on my tongue to be sure it is completely out.
« Last Edit: 09/05/2007 03:26:51 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #107 on: 09/05/2007 12:48:07 »
what you need


a book of safety matches
a large coin
a lighter


what you do



tear the strickin strip off the box of matches and place it on the coin. You don't want it to hang over the edge, so you will probably have to either bend it or tear it in half.

Carefully, use the lighter to set the strip alight. When the strip has burned, carefully move it aside. On the coin, you will see a brown, oily liquid. Rub your finger across it, to get the stuff on your finger. Then rub your finger and thumb together. 


what happens?

ps, this will work best if you have plenty of light and a dark background.


As always, be careful when using matches and lighters.

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #108 on: 13/05/2007 09:43:18 »
what you need


several coins


what you do


Open your right hand and bring it up so that it is on your right shoulder, with the palm facing upwards. Start with three coins. Place them in a stack and balance them on your elbow. Now comes the fun part. You are going to sweep your hand downwards as fast as you can. Be prepared to close your hand when it runs into the coins.

Do this well away from anything glass, or easily broken.

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #109 on: 14/05/2007 10:26:11 »
It occured to me whilst reading through some of these experiments, that not all of them work! No, i'm not just posting rubbish experiments - honest.

But i have never made the lemon battery tingle my tongue, and the surface tension ones with matchsticks and washing up liquid never work for me.Why? no idea.

I previously posted an alternative surface tension experiment with food colouring, but never an alternative potato or fruit battery. battery. So here is one.

What you need


A potato
A nail or paper clip
a piece of copper wire
headphones


What you do

Stick the nail / paperclip in to the potato, about half an inch away stick the copper wire in. If you look at the plug from the headphones, you will see that the metal part is made of two or three sections. Put on the headphones. Touch one piece of metal to one section of the headphones and the other piece of metal to one of the other sections.

Listen carefully, what do you hear?

If the plug has three sections, then you may have to try touching different sections for this to work.

Did you hear anything? Why not trt repeating it with other fruits and metals to see if what you hear is in anyway different.

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #110 on: 14/05/2007 11:02:31 »
Climate change, well we have all heard of it. Maybe your kids have asked questions as to what will happen if the polar icecaps melt.

Well, the northern icecap is easy to explain in a simple experiment.
Question, what will happen to the sea level if the polar icecap melts?

what you need
a glass
water
ice cubes


what you do


Try to get a large lump of several ice cubes frozen together. You can place several ice cubes into a bowl and leave it in the freezer over night and they should freeze together. Place the ice cubes into a glass or bowl. Add enough water to fill the glass to the top. Add as much water as you can, until the glass will not hold any more without overflowing.

Now, look carefully at the glass, water and ice. There is quite a bit of ice sticking up above the glass ( the visable part of the icecap)

what will happen when the ice melts?

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #111 on: 14/05/2007 20:34:58 »
What you need


A tall glass
Ice
Fruit cordial Orange juice
Green food colouring
a straw


What you do



Fill your glass with ice. Carefully pour in the fruit cordial until the glass is a third full. Slowly pour the orange juice into the glass so it sits on the berry cordial. Then tip a little bit of food colouring in. Let the food colouring spread out into the orange juice.

If you gently push a straw into the drink down the side of the glass watch what happens to the food colouring and orange juice. You should also be able to drink one layer at a time, by gently pushing the straw down the side of the glass.

Well, the answer is slighly given away, but, what happens?

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #112 on: 14/05/2007 20:39:35 »
here is a similar one to the last, but this is just for Dads.

what you need


2 glasses
water
Whisky
a hankerchief
A straw


what you do

Put a tot of whisky in one glass and a tot of water in another. Take a clean handkerchief and lay it down the inner side of the water glass until it just touches the water. Gently pour the whisky down the handkerchief.

What happens?

Now use your straw to drink one or the other, or simply to mix things up. This works great at parties!

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #113 on: 15/05/2007 10:42:31 »
Having trouble getting the kids to brush their teeth? This experiment demostrates the way the bacteria in your mouth, release acid which destroys the enamel on your teeth!

The egg and shell bing your tooth and the enamel, and the vinegar being the acid released by the bacteria.



What you need


1 egg
1 small plastic container with a lid
Vinegar


What you do


Place the egg into the container and pour in enough vinegar to cover it. Put the lid on the container and leave it for three days.

what happens to the egg?

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Offline kdlynn

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #114 on: 16/05/2007 03:14:53 »
ok if you could all try this and let me know if the same thing happens to you, that would be great. i've done it twice. what you need: several candles the same size        what you do: freeze half of the candles. light all of them at the same time. wait and see which burns faster. the results i have gotten have had me baffled for a few days now!

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #115 on: 16/05/2007 09:33:39 »
Did you know that there is now a rss feed, for the excellent Kitchen Science section of the main Naked Scientist site? These are the experiments that are conducted on the show.

This is the url for the rss feed: http://www.thenakedscientists.com/rss/kitchen_science.xml


Alternitavley, if you use widgets / widsets on your internet enabled phone. You can download a widget from this link.
http://www.widsets.com/widgets?publicwidgetid=W2222      


If the above link does not take you to the specific widget, just type kitchen science in to the search bar.

RSS (Really Simple Syndication) provides a convenient way to syndicate information from a variety of sources, including news stories, updates to a web site or basically any type of publication. Regardless of the purpose for which the RSS file is being used, by watching this XML file, you can quickly and easily see whenever an update has occurred.

You can use the rss feed in you "home page", if you use yahoo or msn for example.




« Last Edit: 16/05/2007 19:55:13 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #116 on: 16/05/2007 09:48:15 »
What you need

two glasses
a jug or pitcher
ice cubes
water


what you do


Fill your jug with water, take one of the glasses and put 3 or 4 ice cubes in it. Wait a minute and fill the glass with water.

Take your second glass, and 1/2 fill it with water, and add the same quantity of icecubes as the first glass. If it needs more water to fill the glass, then you can add some more.

in which glass do the icecubes melt first?

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Offline kdlynn

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #117 on: 16/05/2007 09:50:52 »
that one sounds interesting

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #118 on: 16/05/2007 20:40:17 »
what you need

a few pieces of chalk
vineger
lemon juice
a saucer


what you do


Put a piece of chalk on a saucer and place 3 or 4 drops of vinegar on the chalk.

What happens?

Try a few drops of lemon juice on the chalk, now what happens?

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #119 on: 16/05/2007 21:30:13 »
This weeks podcast and radio show was about bacteria, fungi and viruses. This experiment demonstrates how you spread the common cold by sneezing.

the pump and water represent what happens when you sneeze.

What you need


Bicycle pump
Some water
A large sheet of paper
Some tape
a friend


What you do


Tape the paper up on a wall and stand back three lengths of the bicycle pump from it. Pull the pump handle of the bicycle pump back then put a couple of drops of water into the end of the bicycle pump hose. Direct the hose at the paper then push down hard on the pump handle.

what happens

to make it real, direct the pump at your friend. Make sure he / she is happy with you doing this first.

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #120 on: 17/05/2007 11:47:31 »
what you need


3 pieces of white paper
Red crayon or felt tip
Blue crayon or felt tip


what you do


Draw a red shape on one piece of white paper and a blue shape on another. Stare hard at the red shape for a few minutes then stare at the blank paper.

What happens?

 
Repeat the experiment with the blue shape.
What happens?
 

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #121 on: 18/05/2007 10:02:18 »
What you need

 
A glass of water
Lemon juice
Castor sugar
Baking soda


What you do

 
Squeeze some lemon juice into the glass of water and stir in a teaspoon of castor sugar. Taste the drink.

add a teaspoon of baking soda.
What happens? What does it taste like?

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #122 on: 18/05/2007 10:21:26 »
what you need

 
Several sheets of newspaper
Several sheets of A4 paper
An inkpad
A pen
Soap and water
Paper towels


What you do


Spread the newspaper down first and have the soap, water and paper towels nearby. Write each person’s name at the top of the paper and have them put their prints onto their page one by one. Get them to wash their hands straight away!


When the prints are dry compare them and see if any of the prints are similar. Maybe some are Whorl patterns, maybe some are loops and some might be arch patterns.


Have them make another set of prints on paper without their name on top and see if you can match their new set with the named set.

If you have brothers or sister, try doing this with them. If you have a twin, what will your results be?

topic link

What causes "fingerprints", and why do we all have different ones? http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=6371.0
« Last Edit: 21/05/2007 07:38:19 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #123 on: 20/05/2007 21:30:55 »
what you need


Jelly
a ladel, or large spoon
glass or clear plate


what you do


Make you jelly. Before letting it set, fill your ladel with the jelly and pop it in to your fridge. After about 3 - 4 hours it should be set.

remove the jelly from the ladel mould, if the jelly does not come out with ease, run hot water over the back of the ladel to free it.

Now, set your jelly mould in the centre of your glass plate. Place the plate on top of a newspaper or book.

what happens?

topic link

"magnifying Glass" http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=7776.0
« Last Edit: 21/05/2007 07:33:17 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #124 on: 20/05/2007 21:42:37 »
what you need

Scissors
a balloon
an empty  2 litre drink bottle, with lid on


what you do

Use the scissors to cut the top off your drink bottle, cut about 2 inches below the lid. Poke a small hole in the bottle lid, then inflate your balloon.

with the neck of the balloon, tightly pinched. Stretch the mouth of the ballooon over the bottle lid, now let go of your grip on the balloon.

what happens?


oops, forgot to mention. do this on either a tabletop or non-carpeted floor.

topic link

"Eactly how does a hover craft work ?" http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=6951.msg73102#msg73102
« Last Edit: 21/05/2007 07:34:35 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #125 on: 22/05/2007 01:24:52 »
what you need


A darkened room
A glass dish of water
A small mirror
A lamp
A large piece of black card with a slit cut in it to let the light through
A small piece of white card


What you do


Sit the small piece of mirror in the dish of water so that it sits at an angle facing towards the black cardboard. Shine the lamp through the slit in the black card (don’t get it too close) and keep moving the mirror until it reflects the light back onto the black card. Put the white card in front of the black card so that the light reflected from the mirror falls on it. Keep moving the mirror until you can see a rainbow on the white card

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #126 on: 22/05/2007 01:32:54 »
what you need


A window
Some cotton wool balls
a friend


what you do


Have your friend stand on the other side of the window. Explain what you’re going to do. Gently through a cotton wool ball at the window at the level of their eyes and see if they blink. They may try really hard not to blink but it’s a reflex action and they will probably blink every time.


topic link

eye lids ??? http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=1646.0

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #127 on: 23/05/2007 22:31:08 »
what you need

a balloon
a straw
string, lots of
2 fixed points
selotape


what you do

Cut the straw in half, and thread your strong through it. tie both ends of the string to two fixed objects (two chairs, a washing line...)now blow up the balloon but do not tie it off.

carefully use the selotape to stck the straw to the balloon, now let go.



what happens

try repeating with longer and longer string and different shaped balloons.

topic link

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #128 on: 30/05/2007 00:50:28 »
what you need

A hair dryer
table tennis ball
Tissue paper


what you do


Blow a stream of air straight up. Carefully balance the ball above the airstream. Pull it slowly out of the flow, what do you notice?

Let go of the ball, now what happens?
With one hand, pull the ball partially out of the airstream. With the other hand, dangle a piece of tissue paper and search for the airstream above the ball, what happens?


Balance the ball in the airstream and then move the blower and the ball toward a wall (try the corner of a room). what happens?
 

« Last Edit: 30/05/2007 01:03:19 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #129 on: 30/05/2007 01:04:58 »
what you need


A Lighter or Matches
small candle
Tall Round Container


what you do


Place the candle just behind the round container. Light the candle, blow against the round container from the front and at candlelight level.

what happens?

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #130 on: 30/05/2007 01:12:46 »
what you need


a uncooked potaot
a straw, or two


what you do


Place the potato on a table top. Hold the straw at the top (without covering the hole) and try to stab the straw into the potato.

what happens?

Now hold your thumb over the hole in the top of another straw and try to stab this straw into the potato.

whathappens now?

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #131 on: 30/05/2007 15:27:06 »
what you need


a Coin
Water
Plastic or other non-transparent bowl


what you do


Put the coin in the bowl and walk backwards until you cannot see the coin in the bowl any more. Have someone pour water slowly into the bowl carefully watch the bowl from where you are standing.

when the bowl is full of water, what do you see?

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #132 on: 01/06/2007 22:01:14 »
what you need

A candle
a carrier / plastic bag
two elastic bands
a long tube (empty kitchen roll type tube)
scissors


what you do


cut two circles from the plastic bag, and make a hole in the middle of one of the circles. Put one on each of the ends of your tube and pull then tightly (tight as a drum skin), seruce them in place with the elastic bands.

Light your candle. With your tube pointing at the candle, give the backend of the tube a sharp whack.

what happens?

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paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #133 on: 02/06/2007 01:47:56 »
what you need


Imagination! or
sand
2 tablespoons of baking soda
Half a cup of vinegar


what you do


Make a volcano shape in the sand and hollow out a well in the top of the volcano. Put in the baking soda and then pour in the vinegar.

What happens?


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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #134 on: 02/06/2007 16:19:38 »
Well, it's the weekend. So why not let the kids make their own silly putty.

what you need


PVA glue (15ml, or 3 teaspoons),
talcum powder (5 ml, or 1 teaspoon),
food colouring (a few drops),
water (25 ml, or 5 teaspoons),
Borax solution (5 ml, or 1 teaspoon),
a glass tumbler,
a plastic bag,
some paper towels.


what you do


Measure the glue into the tumbler (it doesn't have to be too exact). About 15ml (three teaspoonfuls) is enough. The more glue you add the more silly putty you'll get.
Next add about 25ml (5 teaspoons) of water to the tumbler and sprinkle in one teaspoon of talc. Stir thoroughly with the spoon to mix the contents of the tumbler until you have a smooth grey paste. Break up any clumps of talc that form at the sides.
Now add drops of the food colouring until you get the colour you want, but be careful not to add too much.

You now have a tumbler full of colourful, watery glue. It's time for the magic ingredient: borax. Make a borax solution by stirring a heaped teaspoon of borax into a glass of water. Add a teaspoonful of this borax solution to your tumbler of silly putty and stir. Once the borax is mixed in thoroughly, take the spoon out and pull the putty off it.

Work the solid material with your hands for a few minutes. At first it will be quite slimy, but soon it will become smooth and dry. Have the paper towels ready so you can wipe any colour and goo off your hands. You should lay out your plastic bag to protect the work surface. And there you have it: silly putty.

Borax powder is readily available from pharmacies and hardware shops, but you must be careful with it, as it is harmful when swallowed. Always wash your hand after handling Borax



topic link

WHAT EXACTLY IS BORIC ACID< AND WHERE DOES IT COME FROM? http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=6814.0

the properties of silly putty http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=8140.new#new

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #135 on: 03/06/2007 15:55:58 »
what you need


A large iron nail (about 3 inches)
About 3 feet of THIN COATED copper wire
A fresh D size battery
Some paper clips


what you do


Leave about 8 inches of wire loose at one end and wrap most of the rest of the wire around the nail. Try not to overlap the wires.

Cut the wire (if needed) so that there is about another 8 inches loose at the other end too. 

remove about an inch of the plastic coating from both ends of the wire and attach the one wire to one end of a battery and the other wire to the other end of the battery. It is best to tape the wires to the battery - be careful though, the wire could get very hot!

Put the point of the nail near a few paper clips, what happens?


topic link


How fast does a magnet attract ?..and other magnet questions ! http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=6696.0

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #136 on: 03/06/2007 20:49:47 »
Well, it's the weekend. So why not let the kids make their own silly putty.

what you need


PVA glue (15ml, or 3 teaspoons),
talcum powder (5 ml, or 1 teaspoon),
food colouring (a few drops),
water (25 ml, or 5 teaspoons),
Borax solution (5 ml, or 1 teaspoon),
a glass tumbler,
a plastic bag,
some paper towels.


what you do


Measure the glue into the tumbler (it doesn't have to be too exact). About 15ml (three teaspoonfuls) is enough. The more glue you add the more silly putty you'll get.
Next add about 25ml (5 teaspoons) of water to the tumbler and sprinkle in one teaspoon of talc. Stir thoroughly with the spoon to mix the contents of the tumbler until you have a smooth grey paste. Break up any clumps of talc that form at the sides.
Now add drops of the food colouring until you get the colour you want, but be careful not to add too much.

You now have a tumbler full of colourful, watery glue. It's time for the magic ingredient: borax. Make a borax solution by stirring a heaped teaspoon of borax into a glass of water. Add a teaspoonful of this borax solution to your tumbler of silly putty and stir. Once the borax is mixed in thoroughly, take the spoon out and pull the putty off it.

Work the solid material with your hands for a few minutes. At first it will be quite slimy, but soon it will become smooth and dry. Have the paper towels ready so you can wipe any colour and goo off your hands. You should lay out your plastic bag to protect the work surface. And there you have it: silly putty.

Borax powder is readily available from pharmacies and hardware shops, but you must be careful with it, as it is harmful when swallowed. Always wash your hand after handling Borax



topic link

WHAT EXACTLY IS BORIC ACID< AND WHERE DOES IT COME FROM? http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=6814.0

the properties of silly putty http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=8140.new#new

This is way cool, But what is PVA Glue??? Plastic Vinyl adhesive??? LOL I am guessing am I close ??? LOL

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #137 on: 04/06/2007 09:49:20 »
Karen, PVA glue is PVA glue Poly vinyl acetate. It is white and tends to come in tubes, i'm sure you use it at school.

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paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #138 on: 04/06/2007 09:54:52 »
what you need

two tabletennis balls (ping pong balls)
string
sellotape
a straw


what you do


cut two 30cm lengths of string, and sellotape one to each of the table tennis balls. Attach the free end of each string to the top of your door frame, there should be about 3/4 of an inch gap between the balls when they are hung.

Now, use the straw to blow air on to one of the balls. What happens to the gap between the balls?

steady the balls and repeat, this time blowing the air at the gap between the balls. What happens this time?

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #139 on: 05/06/2007 09:50:54 »
what you need

a tin can
can opener
cardboard
sellotape
match or lighter
wooden splint or paper


what you do


remove both ends of the tin can, tape a piece of cardboard over one end, and cut a 1" hole in the center of the cardboard. Tape a disk of thin card over the other end (or you could cut a balloon in half and stretch it over the opening.)

Light your splint or paper and put it in the can through the hole you cut out, leave it there until the can is full of smoke. remove and extinguish the flame.

Tap the bottome gently (the end with no hole in it) what happens?

This will work best in a darkened room while placing the can between you and a bright table lamp and aiming at the ball


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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #140 on: 07/06/2007 20:06:07 »
What you need



4 balloons
an upside-down desk or some other flat-bottomed object that can survive you standing on it
a carpeted floor
a table, pole or wall you can use to help yourself balance.
friends, the more the merrier



what you do



Check that there is nothing sharp on the desk or floor that could burst the balloons. Half-inflate four balloons and tie them off, place one balloon under each corner of the desk.

Have your assistant hold the desk still. They shouldn't try to take the weight, just help keep it balanced. Make sure they do not put any of their fingers under the desk - they might get squashed!

Carefully step up onto the desk. You can use another table or a pole to help you balance as you climb up. Unless something sharp bursts them, the balloons should be able to support your weight.

how many people can you get on one desk before the balloons pop?

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #141 on: 08/06/2007 10:28:26 »
what you need

matchsticks
an eye-dropper
water
a plate.


what you do


Bend five matchsticks in the middle. Be careful not to break them. Arrange the matchsticks on the plate so they are all touching, with the bends in the centre. It should look like a five-pointed asterisk.



Use the dropper to place three or four drops of water in the centre of the matches and watch the matches for a couple of minutes.

What happens?


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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #142 on: 08/06/2007 11:23:49 »
well, its the weekend again. did you make the silly putty last weekend? for the kids this weekend, we have home made playdough.


what you need


1 cup baking soda
1/2 cup corn starch
3/4 cup water
adult supervision


what you do


mix the baking soda and corn starch in a pot.  Use hands to make sure all the lumps are broken up.  Add water.  The adult should put the pan on the stove over medium heat and stir constantly.  As soon as the mixture gathers together, remove from the heat.  When it cools, knead it into a smooth playdough.

Note: Don't over cook this playdough or it will crumble when the children use it.

you can add food colouring, to make different coloured playdough.

sounds obvious, but please supervise the kids when heating the mixture.

be sure to visit the official kitchen science section on the main website http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/content/kitchenscience/
for more fun experiments, they even include nice pictures!
« Last Edit: 08/06/2007 12:02:18 by paul.fr »

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #143 on: 11/06/2007 11:01:39 »
what you need


a margarine container
a balloon
a straw
a rubber band
plasticine
scissors
something that will pierce the margarine container to make a hole big enough to fit a straw through.


what you do


Find a clean, rectangular, margarine container and carefully make a hole in the centre of one of the shorter sides about 1 cm from the bottom.
Cut a straw in half and insert one end into the neck of a balloon. Fix the balloon firmly to the straw with a rubber band.
Push the straw through the hole in the marg container and seal it in place with plasticine. Weigh the back of the marg container with more plasticine in the centre. Blow the balloon up through the straw and pinch the end to keep the air inside.
Put the boat in the water, let go.

What happens?


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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #144 on: 12/06/2007 01:20:52 »
what you need


paper
pen felt-tip or marker pen
scissors



what you do


Start with a long rectangle made from your paper. Give the rectangle a half twist and join the ends so that A is matched with D and B is matched with C.



start midway between the "edges" of a Möbius Strip and draw a line down its center; continue the line until you return to your starting point. Did you ever cross an edge?

Next, hold the edge of a Möbius Strip against the tip of a felt-tipped highlighter pen. Color the edge of the Möbius Strip by holding the highlighter still and just rotating the Mobius Strip around.

Were you able to color the entire edge?

Now, with scissors cut the Mobius Strip along the center line that you drew. Then draw a center line around the resulting band, and cut along it.

what happens?


topic link

are there practical applications for a mobius strip? http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=8246.0

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paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #145 on: 13/06/2007 19:50:41 »
make your own face pack / mask!


what you need


one banana
one tablespoon of honey
one drop of rose oil or sweet almond oil
one teaspoon of lemon juice
one tablespoon of oatmeal
one teaspoon of wheat germ oil
one egg yolk.


what you do


Mash the banana and mix in all of the ingredients except for the rose (or almond) oil. Mash the mixture until it forms a smooth paste. If it is too thick you can add a little bit of water.
Mix in the rose (or almond) oil.
Time to try out your face-mask! Apply the mixture to your face and neck, and rest for 10 minutes.
Wash off the face-mask. You should feel fresh and relaxed.

Our skin has a protective barrier of fats that clump together and create a waterproof layer to keep water in and foreign substances out. Cold or hot weather, wind, air-conditioning and heating can damage this layer of skin, making it dry and flaky.

When you smear the banana mixture on your face, the fat molecules in the banana and rose oil form a temporary waterproof layer over your face, giving your skin cells a chance to rebuild their moisture levels.

The oatmeal in the facemask can help acne – the small grains gently exfoliate your face, removing dead skin and dirt. Honey is well-known for its medicinal properties and it has been used for centuries to treat a variety of diseases. It's been shown to reduce swelling and inflammation in wounds and in some cases can kill germs lurking there. Plus, it can help damaged skin recover more quickly.

This is how i keep my youthful good looks!  [:-[]

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paul.fr

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #146 on: 14/06/2007 09:46:46 »
what you need


a tall glass or plastic container
some vegetable oil
ice (try adding some food colouring to make it easier to see).


what you do


Fill the glass with oil. Drop a block of ice into the glass. The ice should float in the middle of the oil.
Watch the ice as it melts.

what happens?

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paul.fr

  • Guest
Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #147 on: 15/06/2007 20:30:59 »
what yo need

paper


what you do

well, this weekends "experiment" is folding paper. I'm sure you have all heard that it is impossible to fold paper 10 times. Well what you need to do this weeken is just that, fold a piece of paper in half, and in half again, and so on for a total of 10 times.

This has been done, in 2001 by a school girl! Can you get anywhere near her record? I will post the answer as to how she accomplished this on Monday, have a happy paper folding weekend.

Edit: I should add that the record she achieved was 12 folds!
« Last Edit: 15/06/2007 20:38:18 by paul.fr »

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Offline Batroost

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #148 on: 15/06/2007 21:24:06 »
Simple Underwater fireworks?

what you need

A clear glass
Water
Any kind of cooking Oil
Food colour

What you do

Fill the glass approximately 2/3 full with water. Then pour in the oil (over the back of a spoon is best) to near the top of the glass. You'll soon have two clearly defined layers with the oil on top.

Next add small drops of food colour - an eye dropper works best.

Watch the food colour in the oil and then the water and see the differences. Try different colours.

Hint: if things get 'stuck' try prodding with something sharp...
Never express yourself more clearly than you are able to think.

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Offline Batroost

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Re: What's your kitchen science?
« Reply #149 on: 15/06/2007 21:39:09 »
What you need

A cup of water
An ice cube
A length of cotton thread
salt

What you do

Float the ice cube in the glass of water. Tie a loop in th thread and lay it gently on top of the ice cube. sprinkle a little salt on top of the thread and then wait for one minute. When you pull on the thread you should be able to lift the ice cube out of the water!

(The salt lowers the freezing point of the ice and causes it to melt. It then re-refreezes around your thread, trapping it in the ice).
Never express yourself more clearly than you are able to think.