Great women in science!

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Offline Karen W.

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Great women in science!
« on: 14/01/2008 01:46:56 »
Maybe you can add a great women in science and

tell us what she did?

Rosalind.. Would you be so kind as to put your

first cousin here at the top of this page.. in

her honor of coarse!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline rosalind dna

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« Reply #1 on: 13/05/2008 22:58:17 »
Maybe you can add a great women in science and

tell us what she did?

Rosalind.. Would you be so kind as to put your

first cousin here at the top of this page.. in

her honor of coarse!

Yes the top scientist for me is definitely Rosalind Elsie Franklin, the crystallographer, who through her diffraction techniques discovered the Single DNA helix structure and I hope
we know the rest of the story,. That she was unrecognised in her
day but now Rosalind Franklin is a more noticed name in the world of DNA and genetic sciences than Crick and Watson. Good!!!!
Rosalind Franklin was my first cousin and one my life's main regrets is that I never met this brilliant and beautiful lady.
She discovered the Single DNA Helix in 1953, then it was taken by Wilkins without her knowledge or agreeement.

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Offline techmind

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« Reply #2 on: 13/05/2008 23:22:12 »
I compiled this list for another purpose originally (I'm recyling it here).

Kathleen Lonsdale - a crystallographer who used X-rays to prove the structure of benzene and worked on the synthesis of diamonds (worked at University College London)   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kathleen_Lonsdale

(I spent the 3 years of my PhD based in the Kathleen Londsdale building at UCL)

Marjory Stephenson - a biochemist  who worked on microbiology at Cambridge and (with Kathleen Lonsdale) was one of the first two women to be elected to Fellowship of the Royal Society
http://www.biochemj.org/bj/046/0377/0460377_b2.pdf   (obit)

Ada Lovelace (daughter of Lord Byron) - who programmed Babbages' mechanical computers  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_Lovelace
"It has been said that the primary function of schools is to impart enough facts to make children stop asking questions. Some, with whom the schools do not succeed, become scientists." - Schmidt-Nielsen "Memoirs of a curious scientist"

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Offline rosalind dna

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« Reply #3 on: 14/05/2008 15:07:55 »
HOw about Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, who was the very first
British female doctor and sister to Millicent Fawcett.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Garrett_Anderson

Also Dorothy Hodgkins who'd used Protein Crystallography just
like Rosalind Franklin had used Crystallography Diffraction in her research work.,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Crowfoot_Hodgkin
Rosalind Franklin was my first cousin and one my life's main regrets is that I never met this brilliant and beautiful lady.
She discovered the Single DNA Helix in 1953, then it was taken by Wilkins without her knowledge or agreeement.

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blakestyger

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« Reply #4 on: 15/07/2008 20:14:03 »
Let's hear it for Caroline Herschel (1750-1848).
Sister to the famous William Herschel, she was denied an education as a girl in Germany and was destined to become housekeeper to William who was working in England.
She learned spherical geometry and logarithms in conversations with her brother over their breakfast table and became his observing assistant, compiling catalogues of 2500 nebulae and 1000 double stars.
In his absence she did her own observations and discovered eight comets. She received a prestigious award at 78 and another on her 96th birthday.
(Source: Green & Jones, 2003. Introduction to the Sun and Stars, CUP. )

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Offline ibssz

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« Reply #5 on: 15/07/2008 20:34:30 »
Jocelyn Bell Burnell - Discoverer of the first radio pulsar. newbielink:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jocelyn_Bell_Burnell [nonactive]

Florence Nightingale - Inventor of the pie chart and was a pioneer in the medicine industry. newbielink:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Nightingale [nonactive]

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blakestyger

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« Reply #6 on: 15/07/2008 20:46:17 »
Not forgetting Annie Jump Cannon (1863 – 1941) an American astronomer whose cataloguing work was instrumental in the development of contemporary stellar classification. With Edward C. Pickering, she is credited with the creation of the Harvard Classification Scheme, which was the first serious attempt to organize and classify stars based on their temperatures.
(Source: Wikipedia).

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Offline Pumblechook

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« Reply #7 on: 15/07/2008 21:25:34 »
Maria Skłodowska–Curie...  Needs no intro...

Heather Couper.....

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/science/cosmology/heather_couper.shtml



Hedy Lammar....

Although better known as an actress, Austrian Hedy Lammar (born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler) was also an influential female inventor.

Hoping to help combat the Nazis in World War II, Lamar and co-inventor George Anthiel developed a “Secret Communications System” that manipulated radio frequencies at irregular intervals between transmission and reception. The resulting unbreakable code prevented classified messages from being intercepted. The “spread spectrum” technology that Lammar helped to invent influenced the digital communications boom, forming the technical backbone that makes possible cellular phones, fax machines and other wireless operations.

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blakestyger

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« Reply #8 on: 15/07/2008 23:01:35 »
And then there is Barbara McClintock (1902 - 1992).
US botanist and geneticist best known for the discovery of 'jumping genes', mobile genetic elements (transposons) that move along a chromosome and exert control over its genes. Awarded 1983 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.

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blakestyger

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« Reply #9 on: 16/07/2008 16:13:14 »
And finally, there is Stella Artois (b 1971) bibulous Belgian astronomer famous for her prediction that Grey Matter will one day be apparent here on Earth. She has yet to receive an honour.

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Offline neilep

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« Reply #10 on: 16/07/2008 16:29:27 »
Miss Esden my Science teacher was great !
Men are the same as women, just inside out !

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Offline meerajoh

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« Reply #11 on: 01/08/2008 12:20:10 »
The Darwin of our age is certainly Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin. In the words of colleague Max Perutz , she was "a great chemist, a saintly, gentle and tolerant lover of people, and a devoted protagonist of peace".She is known as a founder of the science of protein crystallography.Hodgkin's role in the arena of science policy and international relations was a constant complement to her own scientific work.
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Offline opus

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« Reply #12 on: 01/08/2008 14:00:55 »
Caroline Lucretia Herschel also discovered several nebulae and was the first woman to be paid £50 by George 111 for her astronomical work!

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Offline stevewillie

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« Reply #13 on: 04/09/2008 22:06:58 »
I didn't see two very influential women in this thread:

1)Rachel Carson, marine biologist and author (1907-1964); helped launch the modern environmental movement.

2)Margaret Mead, a leading cultural anthropologist (1901-1978)   

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Offline miriam0920

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« Reply #14 on: 07/09/2008 01:40:46 »
Marie Curie the famous chemist of all times.

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Offline sunflower

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« Reply #15 on: 16/04/2009 13:40:31 »
How about Mary Douglas Leaky. She was a British archaeologist who, while at a dig in Tanzania in 1978, found footprints that were 3.5 million years old. They proved that early man was walking upright long before scientists had predicted.

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Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #16 on: 16/04/2009 13:45:27 »
How did the footprints prove early man was walking upright? Were there only two of them?

----
Why do I get the feeling that you're never going to answer me sunflower?  [:)]
« Last Edit: 16/04/2009 13:53:36 by Chemistry4me »

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Offline sunflower

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« Reply #17 on: 16/04/2009 14:42:12 »
Hi Chemistry4me. The footprints were preserved in volcanic ash and there were no knuckle imprints.

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Offline dentstudent

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« Reply #18 on: 16/04/2009 14:52:03 »
It's probably also possible to determine this by the depth of the print and its full extent, for example, a quadruped with feet similar to ours would not display the same heel mark as a biped.

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Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #19 on: 17/04/2009 00:45:38 »
Ah, I see. Thank you both.

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Offline rosalind dna

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« Reply #20 on: 21/04/2009 10:07:31 »
How about Mary Douglas Leaky. She was a British archaeologist who, while at a dig in Tanzania in 1978, found footprints that were 3.5 million years old. They proved that early man was walking upright long before scientists had predicted.

Is Mary Douglas Leaky related the ecologist and sometime archeologist (sp) Richard Leaky as his sister or mother or wife?
Rosalind Franklin was my first cousin and one my life's main regrets is that I never met this brilliant and beautiful lady.
She discovered the Single DNA Helix in 1953, then it was taken by Wilkins without her knowledge or agreeement.

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Offline rosalind dna

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« Reply #21 on: 13/06/2009 22:32:26 »
How about Mary Douglas Leaky. She was a British archaeologist who, while at a dig in Tanzania in 1978, found footprints that were 3.5 million years old. They proved that early man was walking upright long before scientists had predicted.

Is Mary Douglas Leaky related the ecologist and sometime archeologist (sp) Richard Leaky as his sister or mother or wife?

Mary nee Douglas Leaky is Richard Leaky's mother.
Both worked and lived in Kenya and worked as far as I'm aware for conservation in that African country.
Rosalind Franklin was my first cousin and one my life's main regrets is that I never met this brilliant and beautiful lady.
She discovered the Single DNA Helix in 1953, then it was taken by Wilkins without her knowledge or agreeement.

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Offline Kerry

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« Reply #22 on: 21/05/2010 09:48:13 »
I interviewed a really inspiring lady last week - Missy Cummings. She used to be a fighter pilot in the US Navy and was one of the first women to be allowed to fly jets - pretty awesome!

Now she has her own human and automation lab at MIT where  - amongst other things - she's been building apps for the iPhone to let people fly miniature exploration devices.

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2010/profile-cummings-0405.html [nofollow]
http://web.mit.edu/aeroastro/labs/halab/index.shtml [nofollow]
www.labnews.co.uk [nofollow]
@laboratorynews

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Offline imatfaal

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« Reply #23 on: 21/05/2010 11:14:13 »
Hypatia of Alexandria - mathematician, philosopher, educator and practical scientist in 350-415 CE. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypatia
There’s no sense in being precise when you don’t even know what you’re talking about.  John Von Neumann

At the surface, we may appear as intellects, helpful people, friendly staff or protectors of the interwebs. Deep down inside, we're all trolls. CaptainPanic @ sf.n

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Offline infopioneers

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« Reply #24 on: 03/06/2010 14:57:13 »
We'd be really interested to see what you think of the campaign we're currently running on behalf of the BCS: newbielink:http://pioneers.bcs.org/ [nonactive]

2 of the 5 pioneers highlighted in the campaign are women.
The first is Ada Lovelace (who someone mentions further up) the second is Hedy Lamarr... what do you think?

I honestly didn't realise that Hedy was anything other than an actress until I started working on this!  I'd be really interested in your feedback :)

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Offline Dr.Rubzee

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« Reply #25 on: 03/11/2010 19:22:19 »
Marie Curie polish born cancer reasearcher who won a nobel prize in Physics

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Offline imatfaal

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« Reply #26 on: 04/11/2010 11:56:16 »
Marie Curie also won a Nobel in Chemisty - which puts her into a very select group.  I think only Linus Pauling has also won Nobels in different fields.  Her husband shared her Physics, her daughter and son in law shared a Chemistry Nobel and her other son in law accepted the Nobel Peace Prize as head of Unicef - quite a bright family overall.
There’s no sense in being precise when you don’t even know what you’re talking about.  John Von Neumann

At the surface, we may appear as intellects, helpful people, friendly staff or protectors of the interwebs. Deep down inside, we're all trolls. CaptainPanic @ sf.n

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Offline Kerry

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« Reply #27 on: 05/11/2010 11:20:57 »
I was inspired by this thread to write about several famous female scientists:
Rosalind Frankin: http://www.labnews.co.uk/laboratory_article.php/5828/5/rosalind-franklin-%E2%80%93-forgotten-scientist [nofollow]

and Marie Curie: http://www.labnews.co.uk/laboratory_article.php/5945/5/radioactivity-and-the-woman-who-discovered-it [nofollow]

I was quite disgusted by research from the Royal Society that the majority of the British public couldn't name a famous female scientist http://royalsociety.org/Scientists-trump-popstars-as-role-models-for-girls/ [nofollow]

I may borrow a few other suggestions for other inspirational female scientists for more in the series!
www.labnews.co.uk [nofollow]
@laboratorynews

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Offline pennyt

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« Reply #28 on: 28/12/2010 11:38:06 »
Very informative , I love to read great womens

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Offline BioWizard

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« Reply #29 on: 12/04/2011 05:15:30 »
Barbara McClintock (1902 - 1992).
United States botanist and geneticist best known for the discovery of 'jumping genes', mobile genetic elements (transposons) that move along a chromosome and exert control over its genes. Awarded 1983 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine. She's one of them.


Science is what you know. Philosophy is what you don't know.

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Offline widereader

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Re: Great women in science!
« Reply #30 on: 21/12/2011 23:20:17 »
My professor Josette Biyo was honored by Intel as a planet was named after her---Asteroid Biyo.  She won the Intel Excellence Award. She used to teach Biology and now she is the Director of Philippine Science HIgh School-Western Visayas Campus.