Telemerase

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Telemerase
« on: 25/11/2008 15:40:21 »
So basically this stuff is the life-line?.?.?.

Is it possible to live without telemerase in the chromosomes? If so, are there any creatures evolving away from it?

I am not exactly sure on how it functions in the genes but to the best of my knowlege, it is used in the reproduction of chromosomes. Correct me where I am wrong.

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Offline DoctorBeaver

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Telemerase
« Reply #1 on: 26/11/2008 01:45:01 »
Telomerase is a DNA polymerase with limited functionality. It will only elongate oligonucleotides from the telomere and has no effect on other sequences.
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Offline dentstudent

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Telemerase
« Reply #2 on: 26/11/2008 07:38:14 »
It's also an anagram of Arse Omelet

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Offline Don_1

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Telemerase
« Reply #3 on: 26/11/2008 08:02:32 »
It's also an anagram of Arse Omelet

Waiter, cancel the omelet, I'll just have the two slices of toast, thank you!
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blakestyger

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Telemerase
« Reply #4 on: 26/11/2008 18:35:16 »
Telomerase in yeast cells is active and keeps chromosomes at their appropriate length, but its presence in tumours is linked to the uncontrolled multiplication of cancer cells - it is inactive in normal cells in higher organisms.

Every time a cell divides some sequences of the telomere are lost - so after 60 - 100 divisions the cell dies - this is the telomere theory of ageing that has caused some concern.

Telemerase
« Reply #5 on: 01/12/2008 15:07:04 »
But that is not the case in sex cells is it? If it were the same in the sex cells, then surely all animal lifeforms would be dead by now.

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Offline Bored chemist

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Telemerase
« Reply #6 on: 01/12/2008 18:27:09 »
Two slices of toast is an anagram of "Fossils Act Wet Too".
I don't know a lot about telomeres but I have a nasty feeling that making cells live forever (by whatever mechanism) is exactly the same as making them cancerous.
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Offline Pseudogene

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Telemerase
« Reply #7 on: 02/12/2008 06:42:46 »
Two slices of toast is an anagram of "Fossils Act Wet Too".
I don't know a lot about telomeres but I have a nasty feeling that making cells live forever (by whatever mechanism) is exactly the same as making them cancerous.

Bingo!  There are generally only two types of cells in the body that actively express telomerase, stem cells and cancerous cells.
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