Differences betwn prokaryote, eukaryote & endosymbiont antibiotic susceptibility

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Offline _Stefan_

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Could someone please help me with what the structural and functional differences are between prokaryotes, eukaryotes & endosymbionts, that make them differentially resistant or susceptible to different antibiotics?

Especially the reasons why mitochondria and chloroplasts are resistant to antibiotics that bacteria are susceptible to, even though they have evolved from bacteria themselves?

I am referring to general differences that the groups have, not specific resistances to drugs as in the case of MRSA etc.

Many thanks in advance.
Stefan
"No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle, unless the testimony be of such a kind, that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavors to establish." -David Hume

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Offline Phil1907

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I've not much in the way of reports re. your assumption that mitchondria, for example, are resistant to antibiotics effective vs. bacteria. Certainly those that target cell walls are not relevant.  I do know that chloramphenicol does affect fungal mitchondria as it does bacteria  but it takes higher levels.


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Offline _Stefan_

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Thanks.

I assumed mitochondria and chloroplasts are resistant to some bacteria-targeting antibiotics because otherwise they would die whenever we medicate ourselves against bacterial infections. So what's preventing this from happening?
Stefan
"No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle, unless the testimony be of such a kind, that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavors to establish." -David Hume

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Offline Phil1907

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They're not resistant per se - it just takes greater levels.  The chloramphenicol  mitochondrial inhibition requires higher levels - presume due to the physical separation inside the cell).
Of course they'll not be affected cell wall targeting antibiotics like penicillin.

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Offline _Stefan_

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Thanks Phil!
Stefan
"No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle, unless the testimony be of such a kind, that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavors to establish." -David Hume