How do I calculate the magnitude of the Casimir effect?

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Offline jaiii

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Hello
 
I want to ask how to calculate the force change if it has been used several plates adjacent to the Casimir effect.
 
for example
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 gap between the plates is 20 * 10 ^ -9 m.
 Between the plates is a vacuum?
 
Thank you.
 Goodbye.
« Last Edit: 26/08/2012 09:21:21 by chris »

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Offline imatfaal

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Re: How do I calculate the magnitude of the Casimir effect?
« Reply #1 on: 26/08/2012 23:55:37 »
Hello Again Jaiii - calculations of the Casimir Effect are from memory horrendously complicated.  They simplify for ideal circumstance and perfectly conducting plates to

Force per unit area = [hbar.c.pi^2] / [240.seperation^4]

At nanometre separation you will get a good force - you have the fourth power of 10^-9 on the bottom (which more than makes up for hbar on the top) ; but nanometre separation is probably unrealistic
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Offline jaiii

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Re: How do I calculate the magnitude of the Casimir effect?
« Reply #2 on: 27/08/2012 10:26:06 »
Thank you for your answer,

 but I do not think that the gap 10 ^ -9 is difficult to reach.
 Just a piece of metal or ceramics in the shape of a rectangle or a cylinder with a laser-cut groove with the desired dimensions.
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 So that the entire piece as a whole remained such a geometry is complete.

 Goodbye.

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Offline Bored chemist

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Re: How do I calculate the magnitude of the Casimir effect?
« Reply #3 on: 27/08/2012 13:50:29 »
Cutting nm scale things with a laser is not going to work.
the laser can't be focused down to an area smaller than (roughly) the wavelength of light.
That's about 500nm for visible light.
You might get to somewhere near 10nm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extreme_ultraviolet_lithography
if you have a lot of time money and equipment.
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Offline jaiii

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Re: How do I calculate the magnitude of the Casimir effect?
« Reply #4 on: 27/08/2012 16:27:44 »
Thank for information.

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