Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #200 on: 19/04/2008 13:36:18 »
WOW! Ikod,

I am stunned.  I like you have a connection to leukemia and children.  Don't give up keep pushing someone will listen... I am listening.  I want to talk to you about this very fascinating area on COD Liver Oil.

I am a Pedi Oncologist in USA... we don't often talk about alternative medical practice/methods...but I agree with you.  We cannot be satisfied with the stalemate of the last several years.

Best wishes.




Hi Cod 4 ALL,

welcome to this forum.
I must thank you and congratulate you for your nickname.
(But keep in mind that AML should be more cod-responding!)
Wish you a connection to leukemia not so tight as mine.
I think this matter is not alternative at all,
but pure, crystal-clear and neglected Science!
Enjoy bits and pieces around here

ikoD  [^]
« Last Edit: 26/12/2008 17:40:16 by iko »

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Offline Cod 4 ALL

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #201 on: 19/04/2008 14:00:42 »
Ikod,

I am slowly working my way through this fascinating thread- a clear demonstration of your open thought and ability to define the critical question that plague families of children with cancer.

WHY MY CHILD?
I want to offer a few points to ponder, I don't know the answers myself but perhaps someone can add to the thought as we work through this monster.

1.  Genetic changes seen in patients with leukemia have been demonstrated clonal changes among WBC's in the so called "Guthrie cards" now routinely collected at birth to "screen" for treatable genetic diseases.  This work has been widely reported and thought to support the Knudson "two-hit" theory of cancer development - meaning it takes two separate but cooperating events to cause cancer.

my point and questions this... could these "clonal changes" and Vitamin D deficiency cooperate to PUSH and individual toward leukemia.  The obvious argument against this is that not all patients have demonstrated "clonal" changes.  But could this be a CLUE?

2.  If you consider the simple CBC differential as a person ages... there is a predicted "switch" that occurs in children between the ages of 2-4 where the number or relative percentage of lymphocytes goes from a dominate position of say 50-60% of the total WBC's to a much lower 30-40%.  This may not be related and I certainly don't know the answer why this happens - but it has always "bothered" me as there must be a logical if not scientific reason... the deeper question here is ...

Most children develop leukemia during this same time period...the thought I have had for years is what is the connection....if any.

3.  If we accept that Vitamin D deficiency is only the tip of the problem, I think it has been stated that overall vitamin D plays many roles but roughly divided you can say one is BONE development and two roughly lumped together "CELL SIGNALING" mechanisms.  This brings me to my question about the possible association of Vitamin D and OSTEOSARCOMA.

Is it possible that during the adolescent growth spurt the relative amount of vitamin D available for "CELL SIGNALING" events is decreased - thereby creating a "deficiency state" that promotes bone tumor formation?

I will stop here... for now.  Thanks for listening.

Best wishes
Live, Love and Learn.

"The clue provided by fate [may] lead you [us] to some important advance."  Alexander Fleming

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Offline Cod 4 ALL

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #202 on: 20/04/2008 00:34:06 »
IkoD,
Thanks for the welcome.  I must say when I created my "nickname" I did not intend to put "all" in CAPS - guess it happened for a reason.  I understand why AML would be more likely to be a COD responding condition based on what is known about the VDR.

Do we know what the level of 25(OH)D is among patients newly diagnosed?  For that matter do we know how or if 25(OH)D3 influences lymphocyte populations.  The reason I ask is I have been reading quite a bit lately about using the ABSOLUTE LYMPHOCYTE COUNT during induction chemotherapy as a way to identify patients at "risk" of relapse and survival.

It would seem if we could "modify" the ALC when low using (MYSTERY AGENT) we may be able to "stimulate" ones natural anticancer defenses.  I cannot help myself to think there is some way to link this to your interest - I just don't have the knowledge.  Of course it would help if we knew what the target was?  What do you think NK cells? TH2, TH1?


Below is an excerpt from the abstract.  This should be easy to find with the info provided.

CONCLUSIONS:
"ALC is a simple, statistically powerful measurement for patients with de novo AML and ALL. The results, when combined with previous studies, demonstrate that ALC is a powerful new prognostic factor for a range of malignancies. These findings suggest a need for further exploration of postchemotherapy immune status and immune-modulating cancer therapies. Cancer 2008. © 2007 American Cancer Society."
Cancer Volume 112, Issue 2 , Pages 407 - 415

Live, Love and Learn.

"The clue provided by fate [may] lead you [us] to some important advance."  Alexander Fleming

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #203 on: 20/04/2008 06:07:23 »
Interesting point Cod 4 ALL,

and crossing "vitamin D deficiency" and lymphopenia on PubMed database gives just ONE citation, 18yrs old russian paper: good for a start, isn't it?

[Development of vitamin D deficiency and immunologic disorders in children with glomerulonephritis]
[Article in Russian]


Sergeev IN, Pletsityĭ KD, Rusnak FI, Spirichev VB.
Biochemical symptoms of vitamin D deficiency and a sharp reduction in the number of T-lymphocytes in the peripheral blood were recorded in children suffering from glomerulonephritis. During the combined therapy using the compound "oksidevit " (1-hydroxyvitamin D3) the parameters characterizing D-vitamin providing became normal, and the number of T-lymphocytes in the peripheral blood was recovered.

Vopr Pitan. 1990 Jul-Aug;(4):28-31.


I'm used to cosidering hypothetical COD-related effects as combined by omega-3, vitamin D3 and vitamin A plus a strong placebo effect.  Yes, a placebo for parents and patients that feel lost against the mysterious enemy but have this old remedy, a relic from the past (number one superfood?), a precious nutrient useful to recover over the months and years.
We had all the scheduled pills over the hours...but 'COD' was our particular thing, that had been so good to our family in the past.  A special care.
At the end of maintenance, when all drugs are suspended and you just follow regular check-ups, 'cod' is always there, to help and defend you...just in case.
Focusing too much on vitamin D effects might lead to the same negative results observed with vitamin A in the eighties...



Speaking of why giving stinky "cod" instead of specific synthetic substances, let's borrow this note from the anti-oxidant topic of the Forum:

quote:

A quote from the article is "Just because a food with a certain compound in it is beneficial to health, it does not mean a pill with the same compound in is"


That's exactly right. A pill sometimes works better than the original food and viceversa.

Scientists versus Mother Nature and her tricks

In the late '70s researchers opened their enormous freezers where thousands of serum samples from blood donors had been stocked since over 10yrs before. They wanted to test vitamin A concentration (knowing that it is well preserved in frozen samples) and look for a correlation with cancer incidence in those individuals. Experimental data in animals had demonstrated a positive effect of retinoic acid on precancerous lesions.
They found a strong inverse relation between vitamin A concentration and risk of tumor. All the media started recommending vitamin A to prevent or even fight cancer.
Few years later a proper RCT (randomized clinical trial) was started: a group of nurses and doctors took either a certain dose of vitamin A or a placebo every day for years. The conclusion of the study was disappointing: no difference in cancer incidence with or without vitamin A.
Some clever mind offered an explanation for this: vitamin A had been found increased in blood donors who had lower risk of cancer because it had been eaten together with some other more effective anticancer compounds.
Here we go with all the broccoli, cabbage, cauliflowers and so on...they are rich of vitamin A and probably have other mysterious anticancer factors.

iko



Addendum:
Vitamin A instead of cod liver oil would play the same trick...if you gave vit.A to patients because the ones taking 'cod' had higher levels of retinoic acid in their blood and were doing better (hypothesis!), you could get poor results because you are not giving together Vit.D and a bit of omega-3 fatty acids, the original recipe.

:mudneddA
 Vitamin D instead of cod liver oil would play the same trick...if you gave vit.D to patients because the ones taking 'cod' had higher levels of vitamin D3 in their blood and were doing better (hypothesis!), you could get poor results because you are not giving together Vit.A and a bit of omega-3 fatty acids, the original recipe.





Do we know what the level of 25(OH)D is among patients newly diagnosed?  For that matter do we know how or if 25(OH)D3 influences lymphocyte populations.  The reason I ask is I have been reading quite a bit lately about using the ABSOLUTE LYMPHOCYTE COUNT during induction chemotherapy as a way to identify patients at "risk" of relapse and survival.


Good question, unfortunately the 2005 Mansoura study from Egypt is the only one showing a profund vitamin D deficiency in every leukemic child at diagnosis, 3mts and 1 year.



Low turnover bone disease in Egyptian children with acute leukemia.


El-Ziny MA, Al-Tonbary YA, Salama OS, Bakr AA, Al-Marsafawy H, Elsharkawy AA.
Endocrinology Unit, Pediatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt.

The aim of this work was to study bone turnover markers, calcium homeostasis and bone mineral density (BMD) in children with acute leukemia at diagnosis, after induction chemotherapy, and during maintenance therapy to delineate abnormalities present. After evaluation of L2-L4 BMD using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in patients with acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia at presentation and after treatment, the results were compared to 352 healthy age- and sex-matched Egyptian controls. Calcium homeostasis parameters and bone turnover biochemical markers (serum osteocalcin and urinary deoxypyridinoline) were also assayed and the results were compared to 12 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Osteopenia was observed at diagnosis and during treatment in patients with acute leukemia. At diagnosis osteopenia was observed in 27 patients (62.8%): 10 (23.3%) had non severe osteopenia and 17 (39.5%) had severe osteopenia. This low BMD persisted in those who were followed up. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) (pg/ml) levels demonstrated non significant differences between children with acute leukemia at different stages of therapy and controls, while, 25 (OH) D3 (ng/ml) was significantly lower in acute leukemia patients at different stages of therapy compared to controls (p<0.001). Osteocalcin (ng/ml) is significantly lower in patients at different stages of the disease compared to controls (p<0.001) but there was no significant difference between patients at different stages of therapy. Deoxy-pyridoline cross links showed non-significant difference between the different types of acute leukemia and with controls. Osteopenia is a significant problem in children with acute leukemia at presentation and after chemotherapy. Osteopenia in acute leukemia appears to be of the low turnover type (decreased osteoblastic activity and decreased bone mineralization).

Hematology. 2005 Aug;10(4):327-33.


You should see the table with vitD serum levels!
I wrote an e-mail to this Author in 2006, citing the Shanghai report.
No reply.  Then I was lucky to find this forum.
« Last Edit: 20/04/2008 13:56:38 by iko »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #204 on: 20/04/2008 06:43:13 »
BTW, vitD3 is good for HIV-related lymphopenia as well!  [;D]

A potential role for vitamin D on HIV infection?


Villamor E.
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. evillamo@hsph.harvard.edu

Despite advances in the knowledge of vitamin D's potent immunomodulatory activity, its role on HIV disease progression is unknown. Decreased concentrations of 1alpha,25-hydroxyvitamin D3, or 1,25(OH)2D, the active form of vitamin D, have been reported among HIV-infected people and attributed to defects in renal hydroxylation and increased utilization. A few studies also described low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, 25(OH)D, the vitamin obtained from solar synthesis and diet. An inverse association between 1,25(OH)2D concentrations and mortality has been reported from a small cohort of HIV-infected adults, and some cross-sectional studies have indicated positive correlations between 1,25(OH)2D and CD4+ cell counts. Additional observational studies are needed to confirm the associations between vitamin D status and HIV disease progression. These investigations would provide useful insights on the potential role of vitamin D supplementation to HIV-infected persons and the planning of intervention trials.

Nutr Rev. 2006 May;64(5 Pt 1):226-33.





P.S.
I'll do my best to reply point 1-3 from your previous post.
Deep questions need more thinking...



« Last Edit: 20/04/2008 09:38:38 by iko »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #205 on: 20/04/2008 13:18:15 »

Do we know what the level of 25(OH)D is among patients newly diagnosed?  For that matter do we know how or if 25(OH)D3 influences lymphocyte populations.  The reason I ask is I have been reading quite a bit lately about using the ABSOLUTE LYMPHOCYTE COUNT during induction chemotherapy as a way to identify patients at "risk" of relapse and survival.


CONCLUSIONS:
"ALC is a simple, statistically powerful measurement for patients with de novo AML and ALL. The results, when combined with previous studies, demonstrate that ALC is a powerful new prognostic factor for a range of malignancies. These findings suggest a need for further exploration of postchemotherapy immune status and immune-modulating cancer therapies. Cancer 2008. © 2007 American Cancer Society."
Cancer Volume 112, Issue 2 , Pages 407 - 415



It's not your fault, I know it, but this makes me feel old and useless.
Almost thirty years have past, studying kinetics and differentiation of the bad 'clones', ignoring the initial causes, testing any remedy... and here we are, counting total circulating lymphocytes to predict an early death.  Where is Science?
I apologize, tomorrow it will be much better.
« Last Edit: 20/04/2008 13:52:28 by iko »

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Offline Cod 4 ALL

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #206 on: 20/04/2008 15:54:58 »
IkoD,

I agree with you... but this is hard to ignore, there are other papers citing the effect among solid tumors in children.  I should add the original evidence was found in adults following stem cell transplant.

The Mansoura, Egypt data will require more analysis on my part.  It is clearly interesting that they show Vit D deficiency at diagnosis... I think they were looking at this as a clue to the BMD problems seen with ALL therapy.  But before I make wrong assumptions I will need to review the full manuscript and data tables.

This "ALC" effect is real.  But what does it mean?  Is it yet another clue?  Your reply is like others that I have discussed this with.  Everyone cannot believe how we missed this.

Kind of feels like COD and the LOST but not forgotten Shanghai report.  Thanks for the reminder to not FOCUS too much on VIT D3.  I will be in touch.

Live, Love and Learn.

"The clue provided by fate [may] lead you [us] to some important advance."  Alexander Fleming

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #207 on: 21/04/2008 11:23:58 »
...A massive vitamin D 'tsunami' is coming closer,
spinning out of the scientific literature circuit:
will flu vaccination campaigns be the first casualties?

Epidemic influenza and vitamin D.

Cannell JJ, Vieth R, Umhau JC, Holick MF, Grant WB, Madronich S, Garland CF, Giovannucci E.
Atascadero State Hospital, 10333 El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA 93422, USA.

In 1981, R. Edgar Hope-Simpson proposed that a 'seasonal stimulus' intimately associated with solar radiation explained the remarkable seasonality of epidemic influenza. Solar radiation triggers robust seasonal vitamin D production in the skin; vitamin D deficiency is common in the winter, and activated vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D, a steroid hormone, has profound effects on human immunity. 1,25(OH)2D acts as an immune system modulator, preventing excessive expression of inflammatory cytokines and increasing the 'oxidative burst' potential of macrophages. Perhaps most importantly, it dramatically stimulates the expression of potent anti-microbial peptides, which exist in neutrophils, monocytes, natural killer cells, and in epithelial cells lining the respiratory tract where they play a major role in protecting the lung from infection. Volunteers inoculated with live attenuated influenza virus are more likely to develop fever and serological evidence of an immune response in the winter. Vitamin D deficiency predisposes children to respiratory infections. Ultraviolet radiation (either from artificial sources or from sunlight) reduces the incidence of viral respiratory infections, as does cod liver oil (which contains vitamin D). An interventional study showed that vitamin D reduces the incidence of respiratory infections in children. We conclude that vitamin D, or lack of it, may be Hope-Simpson's 'seasonal stimulus'.

Epidemiol Infect. 2006 Dec;134(6):1129-40. Epub 2006 Sep 7.






Note: ... Vitamin D deficiency predisposes children to respiratory infections .

from: Rickets Today - Children Still Need Milk and Sunshine

Nicholas Bishop,M.D.  University of Sheffield
...
Rickets may have severe consequences. It is strongly associated with pneumonia in young children in developing countries. In a case–control study at the Ethio-Swedish Children's Hospital in Addis Ababa,3 Muhe and colleagues demonstrated an incidence of rickets among children with pneumonia that was 13 times as high as that among control children, after adjustment for family size, birth order, crowding, and months of exclusive breast-feeding. The relative risk of death for the children with rickets as compared with the children without rickets was 1.7. Furthermore, bony deformity of the pelvis in women leads to obstructed labor and increased perinatal morbidity and mortality.
...
Children in developed countries need calcium, too. There is clear evidence from prospective studies of dietary supplementation that increased calcium intake during childhood results in increased calcium retention and increased bone mass.8 Young adults with a history of greater milk consumption have a higher total-body bone mass than those with lower intake after the influence of body size is taken into account.9 Calcium, vitamin D, and phosphate are essential nutrients for the growing skeleton. Wherever children live, they should follow Grandma's advice: "Drink up your milk, and go play outside."

N.Engl.J.Med. 1999 341(8): 602-604.










Connection vitD&low lymphs:  Infantile rickets reduces lymphocyte survival

http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=18348812








Infantile rickets reduces lymphocyte survival


EL HODHOD Moustafa A., NASSAR May Fouad, IBRAHIM Abla Y.
Department of Pediatric, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566, EGYPTE
Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University Specialized Hospital, Cairo, EGYPTE


Increased incidence of infections had long been recognized in rachitic patients who were also described to have impaired lymphocytic functions.
 This study was designed to assess different apoptotic changes in peripheral lymphocytes in patients with infantile rickets in its various stages and to correlate these findings with the frequency of infection in this disease. The study included 24 rachitic patients with a mean age of 17.88 ± 7.65 months compared with 16 healthy matching controls. There were 7 rachitic patients who were in the active stage, 11 in the healing stage, and 6 in the healed stage. The enrolled cases were subjected to a full history and clinical examination. X-ray of extremities was performed, in addition to the laboratory tests including serum calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase as well as direct immunofluorescence using flow cytometry with dual staining technique to check for apoptotic changes in peripheral lymphocytes. The results of the present study showed that the early apoptotic cells percent (EAC%), the late apoptotic and/or necrotic cells percent (LA and/or NC%), the NC%, and the total abnormal cells (%) of the lymphocytes were higher in the rachitic patients compared with healthy controls; although only the latter showed statistical significance. The EAC% of lymphocytes showed a trend to increase accompanied by a simultaneous decrease in the LA and/or NC% with the progression toward the healed rickets stage. The current study also showed a trend of the EAC% and LA and/or NC% of the lymphocytes to decrease with the doses of vitamin D shock therapy given to the rachitic patients. A significant positive correlation was demonstrated between the EAC% and the total abnormal cells (%) of the peripheral lymphocytes and the rate of chest infection in the rachitic cases in the 3 months previous to the study.
In conclusion, rickets does not increase the rate of infection through local causes or immune cell dysfunction only, but it entails disturbed lymphocyte survival. The increased apoptotic tendency of peripheral lymphocytes in rickets is reversed with vitamin D therapy, which further emphasizes the importance of early prevention and proper treatment of such a disease.

Nutrition research 2006, 26 (11), 561-566.


« Last Edit: 29/07/2008 20:44:15 by iko »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #208 on: 28/04/2008 21:51:47 »
Putting Cod 4 ALL questions in the right order...to reply properly asap.



1.  Genetic changes seen in patients with leukemia have been demonstrated clonal changes among WBC's in the so called "Guthrie cards" now routinely collected at birth to "screen" for treatable genetic diseases.  This work has been widely reported and thought to support the Knudson "two-hit" theory of cancer development - meaning it takes two separate but cooperating events to cause cancer.

my point and questions this... could these "clonal changes" and Vitamin D deficiency cooperate to PUSH and individual toward leukemia.  The obvious argument against this is that not all patients have demonstrated "clonal" changes.  But could this be a CLUE?


Not every leukemia shows clonal changes, as far as I know.
If plenty of immature white cells don't stop dividing, seem unable to differentiate and manage to reach circulating blood from the bone marrow, invading other organs...
well something must be definitely wrong, and it shouldn't matter so much whether they came from one or more 'clones' out of control.
Timo Timonen's hypothesis shows exactly this: vitamin D deficiency in some patients might contribute to let some precursor cells, damaged by a previous infection (viral flu, mycoplasma?) escape from control and start the disease.
In some patients, of course.
We know from the 'Shanghai report' that daily doses of vitamins A and D (actually cod liver oil!) -taken for at least one year- could be able to reduce leukemia incidence to half or 1/3.
It's not much, but we (parents) should give it a chance and offer this protection to our sick children, to avert relapse risk. 

Quote

2.  If you consider the simple CBC differential as a person ages... there is a predicted "switch" that occurs in children between the ages of 2-4 where the number or relative percentage of lymphocytes goes from a dominate position of say 50-60% of the total WBC's to a much lower 30-40%.  This may not be related and I certainly don't know the answer why this happens - but it has always "bothered" me as there must be a logical if not scientific reason... the deeper question here is ...

Most children develop leukemia during this same time period...the thought I have had for years is what is the connection....if any.


I'm not your expert for this.  I simply thought that lymphocyte pool is expanded during the first 3-5 years of life for physiological reasons (proper immunological setting under thymus-nodes-spleen control, Ig genes rearrangement etc.), so this state of hyperactivity may more easily get in trouble if something (a reaction to a common pathogen) goes wrong.
Vitamin D deficiency may play a role.

Quote

3.  If we accept that Vitamin D deficiency is only the tip of the problem, I think it has been stated that overall vitamin D plays many roles but roughly divided you can say one is BONE development and two roughly lumped together "CELL SIGNALING" mechanisms.  This brings me to my question about the possible association of Vitamin D and OSTEOSARCOMA.

Is it possible that during the adolescent growth spurt the relative amount of vitamin D available for "CELL SIGNALING" events is decreased - thereby creating a "deficiency state" that promotes bone tumor formation?


Why not?
Some time ago I couldn't find any study about VitD levels in patients with osteosarcoma.
At least we HAVE 2-3 papers about VitD deficiency in leukemia!




« Last Edit: 03/05/2008 20:46:17 by iko »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #209 on: 04/05/2008 16:41:21 »

We know from the 'Shanghai report' that daily doses of vitamins A and D (actually cod liver oil!) -taken for at least one year- could be able to reduce leukemia incidence to half or 1/3.
It's not much, but we (parents) should give it a chance and offer this protection to our sick children, to avert relapse risk.
 


Yes, an autoquote.
Waiting for cod4ALL and his comments on the 'Mansoura report' and those striking data about vitamin D deficiency at 0-3-12 months after a diagnosis of childhood leukemia (47 cases: further studies are obviously needed...in the next 2-3 decades).


for at least one year

Why such a long lag-phase of cod-therapy is needed before achieving a significant anti-leukemia effect?  Could this be bound mainly to a vitamin D action?

Well, simple minds can only give simple answers:

If proper levels of vitamin D are needed to counteract leukemia onset, a deficient child (and most humans seem to be vitamin D deficient these days!) gets a relatively small amount of the sunshine vitamin from daily doses of cod liver oil.   Maybe vitamin A helps, together with omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E, but daily vitamin D through 'cod' is about 400 I.U.
Not much to treat deficiency, so it could take longer to reach adequate concentrations and work properly.

Maybe vitamin A helps

This is a recent medical hypothesis: vitamin A could prevent toxicity of vitamin D and cooperate with vitamin K too...most of the fat-soluble vitamins together!
Isn't it wonderful?   [;)]



Vitamin D toxicity redefined: vitamin K and the molecular mechanism.


Masterjohn C.
Weston A. Price Foundation, 4200 Wisconsin Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20016, United States. ChrisMasterjohn@gmail.com

The dose of vitamin D that some researchers recommend as optimally therapeutic exceeds that officially recognized as safe by a factor of two; it is therefore important to determine the precise mechanism by which excessive doses of vitamin D exert toxicity so that physicians and other health care practitioners may understand how to use optimally therapeutic doses of this vitamin without the risk of adverse effects. Although the toxicity of vitamin D has conventionally been attributed to its induction of hypercalcemia, animal studies show that the toxic endpoints observed in response to hypervitaminosis D such as anorexia, lethargy, growth retardation, bone resorption, soft tissue calcification, and death can be dissociated from the hypercalcemia that usually accompanies them, demanding that an alternative explanation for the mechanism of vitamin D toxicity be developed.
The hypothesis presented in this paper proposes the novel understanding that vitamin D exerts toxicity by inducing a deficiency of vitamin K. According to this model, vitamin D increases the expression of proteins whose activation depends on vitamin K-mediated carboxylation; as the demand for carboxylation increases, the pool of vitamin K is depleted. Since vitamin K is essential to the nervous system and plays important roles in protecting against bone loss and calcification of the peripheral soft tissues, its deficiency results in the symptoms associated with hypervitaminosis D. This hypothesis is circumstantially supported by the observation that animals deficient in vitamin K or vitamin K-dependent proteins exhibit remarkable similarities to animals fed toxic doses of vitamin D, and the observation that vitamin D and the vitamin K-inhibitor Warfarin have similar toxicity profiles and exert toxicity synergistically when combined.
The hypothesis further proposes that vitamin A protects against the toxicity of vitamin D by decreasing the expression of vitamin K-dependent proteins and thereby exerting a vitamin K-sparing effect. If animal experiments can confirm this hypothesis, the models by which the maximum safe dose is determined would need to be revised. Physicians and other health care practitioners would be able to treat patients with doses of vitamin D that possess greater therapeutic value than those currently being used while avoiding the risk of adverse effects by administering vitamin D together with vitamins A and K.

Med Hypotheses. 2007;68(5):1026-34.



Masterjohn's hypothesis about cooperation between these three fat-soluble vitamins is just fascinating.
If proper levels of vitamin A were required to avoid vitamin D toxicity, or to optimize its effects, giving cod liver oil containing Vitamins A and D (text-string from the Shanghai report!) would be much better and safer than recommending vitamin D supplementation alone.
Ancient studies first suggested this protective effect, and they are properly cited in the article:

11) Thoenes F.    Uber die Korrelation von vitamin A and D.
       Deutsch Med Woch 1935;61:2079.

12) Morgan AF, Kimmel l, Hawkins NC.    A comparison of the hypervitaminoses induced by irradiated ergosterol and fish liver oil concentrates.
       J Biol Chem  1937;120(1):85-102.

13) Clark I, Basset CAL.    The amelioration of hypervitaminosis D in rats with vitamin A.
       J Exp Med  1962;115:147-56.




New recipe

Quote

"Physicians and other health care practitioners would be able to treat patients with doses of vitamin D that possess greater therapeutic value than those currently being used while avoiding the risk of adverse effects by administering vitamin D together with vitamins A and K."

Med Hypotheses. 2007;68(5):1026-34.

And here we go with cod liver oil (containing vitamins A and D) plus spinaches, cabbage, cauliflower, and other green leafy vegetables (rich of vitamin K)!
We might even give rosemary (carnosic acid) and sesamolin a chance.
And never forget orange juice! (but that's another story)  [;D]




« Last Edit: 08/05/2008 22:25:45 by iko »

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Offline Cod 4 ALL

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #210 on: 04/05/2008 19:58:58 »
I am a little busy right now I will properly reply as I have more time to compile my thoughts.  Sorry - not lack of interest just time.
Live, Love and Learn.

"The clue provided by fate [may] lead you [us] to some important advance."  Alexander Fleming

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #211 on: 04/05/2008 23:03:06 »
I am a little busy right now I will properly reply as I have more time to compile my thoughts.  Sorry - not lack of interest just time.

Take your time cod4ALL,
I'll wait.   I've been around here for almost 2 years!  [;D]

I hope you had enough time to check this out:

Connection vitD&low lymphs:  Infantile rickets reduces lymphocyte survival
http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=18348812

« Last Edit: 04/05/2008 23:11:24 by iko »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #212 on: 07/05/2008 21:43:33 »
Could by any chance the old remedy, a relic from the past,
an inexpensive nutrient containing vitamins A and D,
help leukemic patients in the long run, AFTER treatment?
According to this recent study, the answer is yes.


Differentiation-inducing liposoluble vitamin deficiency may explain
frequent secondary solid tumors after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
Minireview.


Gedikoglu G, Altinoz MA.

Secondary cancers are among the most threatening long-term health problems of hematopoetic stem cell- transplant (HSCT) patients. There are several lines of evidence indicating the possibility of a prolonged Vitamin A deficiency for solid tumor-type secondary cancers: I- Solid tumors such as oral cavity, head/neck region squamous carcinomas, skin cancers and melanomas, where lowered Vitamin A concentrations and chemo-preventing activity of its derivatives (retinoids) are most explicitly proven, arise much more frequently than others. II- Early monitorings: A significant retinol deficiency in HSCT patients is detectable along with a severity of mucositis and the vulnerability to infection. III- Monitoring of other liposoluble vitamins: Vitamin D, a differentiation-inducing vitamin like Vitamin A, showed a sustained decrease. Another similarity of these two vitamins is that they also depend on intestinal absorption and are decreased due to bowel injury by conditioning agents and chronic graft-versus-host disease. IV- Peroxidative reactions and inflammation can directly exhaust retinol levels despite sufficient intake. Considering the similar inhibitory role of Vitamin D analogs (deltanoids) on squamous carcinomas, skin tumors and melanomas, we propose that animal studies and extended vitamin surveillance studies in HSCT patients may unfold a preventive strategy against long-term complications.

Neoplasma. 2008;55(1):1-9.



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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #213 on: 08/05/2008 17:21:55 »
Some news come out crossing "Vitamin D" and "leukemia" on PubMed database.
A study from Valparaiso, Chile, published in January 2008:
Vitamin D administration to leukemic children for 1 year!!!


Effect of 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D on bone mass in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.


Díaz PR, Neira LC, Fischer SG, Teresa Torres MC, Milinarsky AT, Giadrosich VR, Arriagada MM, Arinoviche RS, Casanova DM.
Pediatric Hemato-Oncology Department, Viña del Mar School of Medicine, University of Valparaíso, Chile.

BACKGROUND: Calcitriol deficit has been described in patients with acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL). The aim of this randomized case-control trial is to investigate the effectiveness of calcitriol administration during the first year of treatment to protect bone mass. Sixteen children recently diagnosed with ALL, aged 1.7 to 11.5 years, average 5.5, completed the study. Anthropometrical measurements, food intake record, physical activity, and bone pain were registered. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry was performed at the completion of remission induction chemotherapy (after 1 mo) to measure bone mineral density (BMD) at hip, lumbar spine and whole body, and total bone mineral content and 1 year after. Half of them were randomly assigned to receive calcitriol during 1 year.
STATISTICAL: Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, Mann-Whitney, and Spearman.
RESULTS: Both groups had similar anthropometric measurements and bone densitometric variables increments. Spine BMD significantly increased in calcitriol supplemented children with lower baseline BMD (r=-0.78 and P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: One-year calcitriol administered to recently diagnosed ALL children did not show impact on bone mass. Greater increment in lumbar spine bone mass was observed in patients who received calcitriol and had lower baseline BMD.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2008 Jan;30(1):15-9.



Never mind.  A 'near-miss' for cod liver oil maniacs and vitamin D fanatics.
The 'Shanghai report' and the 'Mansoura study' are not even mentioned.
Neither this thread in the Naked Scientists Forum is cited!  [;D]

Plasma levels of vitamin D before and after treatment were not measured and the Authors apologize for that.
Unfortunately only calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D has been given to these children, not vitamin D3 or ultraviolet exposure.

Far away from suspecting a vit D deficiency, measuring it and providing proper treatment:

Quote
...
Treatment of vitamin D deficiency with 1,25(OH2)D (calcitriol) or analogues of 1,25(OH2)D (paricalcitol, doxercalciferol)

are inappropriate, ineffective, dangerous and contraindicated
.

JJ Cannell et al.  2008 excellent and concise review available full-text online!


Quote



Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency.


Cannell JJ, Hollis BW, Zasloff M, Heaney RP.
Atascadero State Hospital, 10333 El Camino Real, Atascadero, California 93422, USA. jcannell@ash.dmh.ca.gov

The recent discovery--in a randomised, controlled trial--that daily ingestion of 1100 IU of colecalciferol (vitamin D) over a 4-year period dramatically reduced the incidence of non-skin cancers makes it difficult to overstate the potential medical, social and economic implications of treating vitamin D deficiency. Not only are such deficiencies common, probably the rule, vitamin D deficiency stands implicated in a host of diseases other than cancer. The metabolic product of vitamin D is a potent, pleiotropic, repair and maintenance, secosteroid hormone that targets > 200 human genes in a wide variety of tissues, meaning it has as many mechanisms of action as genes it targets. A common misconception is that government agencies designed present intake recommendations to prevent or treat vitamin D deficiency. They did not. Instead, they are guidelines to prevent particular metabolic bone diseases. Official recommendations were never designed and are not effective in preventing or treating vitamin D deficiency and in no way limit the freedom of the physician--or responsibility--to do so. At this time, assessing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D is the only way to make the diagnosis and to assure that treatment is adequate and safe. The authors believe that treatment should be sufficient to maintain levels found in humans living naturally in a sun-rich environment, that is, > 40 ng/ml, year around. Three treatment modalities exist: sunlight, artificial ultraviolet B radiation or supplementation. All treatment modalities have their potential risks and benefits. Benefits of all treatment modalities outweigh potential risks and greatly outweigh the risk of no treatment. As a prolonged 'vitamin D winter', centred on the winter solstice, occurs at many temperate latitudes, < or = 5000 IU (125 microg) of vitamin D/day may be required in obese, aged and/or dark-skinned patients to maintain adequate levels during the winter, a dose that makes many physicians uncomfortable.

Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2008 Jan;9(1):107-18.










« Last Edit: 20/08/2008 22:12:29 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #214 on: 08/05/2008 21:21:15 »
Quote



Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency.


Cannell JJ, Hollis BW, Zasloff M, Heaney RP.
Atascadero State Hospital, 10333 El Camino Real, Atascadero, California 93422, USA. jcannell@ash.dmh.ca.gov

The recent discovery--in a randomised, controlled trial--that daily ingestion of 1100 IU of colecalciferol (vitamin D) over a 4-year period dramatically reduced the incidence of non-skin cancers makes it difficult to overstate the potential medical, social and economic implications of treating vitamin D deficiency. Not only are such deficiencies common, probably the rule, vitamin D deficiency stands implicated in a host of diseases other than cancer. The metabolic product of vitamin D is a potent, pleiotropic, repair and maintenance, secosteroid hormone that targets > 200 human genes in a wide variety of tissues, meaning it has as many mechanisms of action as genes it targets. A common misconception is that government agencies designed present intake recommendations to prevent or treat vitamin D deficiency. They did not. Instead, they are guidelines to prevent particular metabolic bone diseases. Official recommendations were never designed and are not effective in preventing or treating vitamin D deficiency and in no way limit the freedom of the physician--or responsibility--to do so. At this time, assessing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D is the only way to make the diagnosis and to assure that treatment is adequate and safe. The authors believe that treatment should be sufficient to maintain levels found in humans living naturally in a sun-rich environment, that is, > 40 ng/ml, year around. Three treatment modalities exist: sunlight, artificial ultraviolet B radiation or supplementation. All treatment modalities have their potential risks and benefits. Benefits of all treatment modalities outweigh potential risks and greatly outweigh the risk of no treatment. As a prolonged 'vitamin D winter', centred on the winter solstice, occurs at many temperate latitudes, < or = 5000 IU (125 microg) of vitamin D/day may be required in obese, aged and/or dark-skinned patients to maintain adequate levels during the winter, a dose that makes many physicians uncomfortable.

Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2008 Jan;9(1):107-18.





I know you cannot read it and I'm perfectly aware that most people aren't interested in Dr. Cannell's crusade on vitamindcouncil.com as well.
These days people read messages like these:

Quote

"Keep away from the sun to avoid cancer"

"multivitamin pills shorten your life"


Something must be wrong around here.
So, before we hear the usual folks blaming vitamin D supporters for huge profits from celebrity and vitamin pills plus UV lamps market, let me report the final words of this superb review by John Cannell and his colleagues.
Please do read the complete article: if you had enough time to read this crap page, you MUST find a few minutes for real Science!


Quote


...
To the authors' knowledge, plaintiffs' attorneys are not yet involved in the vitamin D debate.   After the findings of Lappe et al. (1), it may only be a matter of time until lawsuits against physicians begin to appear, claiming that physicians dispensed sun-avoidance advice, but negligently failed to diagnose and treat the consequent vitamin D deficiency, leading to fatal cancers.   Unless the future literature fails to support the present, such medical malpractice suits may become commonplace.

Finally, physicians and policy-makers should understand that much of the future of vitamin D is out of their hands.   Inexpensive high-dose supplements are now widely available to the American public over-the-counter and to the world via the Internet.   Sunlight remains free.   A Google search for 'vitamin D' reveals several million hits.   After the Canadian Cancer Society recently recommended 1000 IU/day for all Canadian adults in the wintertime, vitamin D disappeared off the shelves, causing a shortage during the summer.

The pleiotropic actions and unique pharmacology of vitamin D mean educated patients, on their own, can entirely control their own tissue levels of this steroid, through either UVB exposure or over-the-counter supplementation.   Given the attitudes that some in mainstream medicine have about any substance with the word 'vitamin' in it (105), the public and not the medical profession may be the first to enter the vitamin D era.






reference 105:


Battling quackery: attitudes about micronutrient supplements in American academic medicine.

Goodwin JS, Tangum MR.
Center on Aging, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston 77555-0460, USA.

...sorry, $15 to read even the only abstract!!!  [>:(]

Arch Intern Med. 1998 Nov 9;158(20):2187-91.




« Last Edit: 09/05/2008 11:29:19 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #215 on: 30/06/2008 21:20:10 »
WOW! Folks, I'm stunned too...

so much time has passed, the "resurrection of vitamin D" is going fast and many scientific reports are invading the medical literature.
Still, Googling this particular text-string: " vitamin D deficiency in leukemia "...you find absolutely no result.    It will be a long way.

ikoD


BTW, today, typing: "vitamin D deficiency in " gives you a 120,000 round figure.
                   "vitamin C deficiency in " gives you 18,100 citations.





...it's just about time to change the title of this "ancient" thread:

from "Cod Liver Oil and Childhood Leukemia" to a more intriguing "Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?"


From now on, this highly specific text-string "works" on Google!
« Last Edit: 19/08/2008 11:56:22 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #216 on: 30/06/2008 21:57:16 »
September 1999...November 2007:

 "Play it again Timo!"


Are sunlight deprivation and influenza epidemics associated with the onset of acute leukemia?


Timonen T, Näyhä S, Koskela T, Pukkala E.
Department of Internal Medicine, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.

Month of diagnosis of 7,423 cases of acute leukemia (AL) in Finland during 1964-2003 were linked with data on influenza and solar radiation.
Acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) showed the highest risk in the dark season. During the light season, the incidence decreased by 58% (95% confidence interval, 16-79%) per 1,000 kJ/m(2)/d increase of solar radiation. Independent of solar radiation, AML increased by 9% (95% confidence interval, 0-19%) during influenza epidemics. Reoccurring at the same time annually, darkness-related vitamin D deficiency and influenza could cause successive and co-operative mutations leading to AL with a short latency.

Haematologica. 2007 Nov;92(11):1553-6.

Free full-text available on line:
http://www.haematologica.org/cgi/reprint/92/11/1553?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=1&andorexacttitle=and&andorexacttitleabs=and&andorexactfulltext=and&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&sortspec=relevance&volume=92&firstpage=1553&resourcetype=HWCIT



...Surprisingly enough, the "Shanghai report" is not mentioned in the whole article.


Nobody is perfect.
[:D]




...
Getting close

…In late 1999 a team of Finnish pediatricians investigate bone turn over in children suffering from cancer (40% leukemias) at completion of therapy. They find abnormal data related to calcium and bone metabolism that explain the high incidence of osteoporosis and pathological fractures observed in these patients. Together with calcium, vitamin D is found significantly lower (P<0.0001). These alterations are referred to bone invasion by cancer initially, but most of all to chemotherapy damage later. These Authors suggest to consider a controlled clinical trial to evaluate the possibility of vitamin D and calcium supplementation.


Click down here to see the abstract:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=10531569&query_hl=2&itool=pubmed_docsum

Suprisingly, in 1999, writing from the very same country (Finland) the bright hematologist T.T.Timonen gets published in Ann.Hematol. "A hypothesis concerning deficiency of sunlight, cold temperature, and influenza epidemics associated with the onset of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in northern Finland." In the end of the summary: "is hypothesized that sunlight deprivation in the arctic winter can lead to a deficiency of the 1, 25(OH)2D3 vitamin, which might stimulate leukemic cell proliferation and block cell differentiation through dysregulation of growth factors in the bone marrow stromal cells, causing one mutation and an overt ALL in progenitor cells damaged during the current or the previous winter by influenza virus, the other mutation."

"A hypothesis concerning deficiency of sunlight, cold temperature, and influenza epidemics associated with the onset of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in northern Finland."  by T.T. Timonen, 1999.

Click down here to see the abstract:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=10525828&query_hl=6&itool=pubmed_docsum

...but all this is just supporting Mel Greaves’s hypothesis: “the final hit may be infectious”.
Dr. Timo Timonen actually introduces the concept that vitamin D3 deficiency itself might cause leukemia in some patients.


http://www.corecharacter.com/uploads/einstein3-thumb.jpg

"The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday thinking."
Albert Einstein





Quote
...
The pleiotropic actions and unique pharmacology of vitamin D mean educated patients, on their own, can entirely control their own tissue levels of this steroid, through either UVB exposure or over-the-counter supplementation.   Given the attitudes that some in mainstream medicine have about any substance with the word 'vitamin' in it, the public and not the medical profession may be the first to enter the vitamin D era.



..."educated patients" doesn't necessarily mean that they had read up on vitamin D.
In some cases personal experience helped to solve this problem from the very start.

Many years ago, at the camping ground near the seaside where I went with my family, I noticed four elderly men around a table, playing cards.
One of the group was 'reeeally' tanned, almost black, much darker than the others.  Another friend passed by and started chatting.
After having said to the overtanned fellow: "You surely took a lot of sun this summer!",
he got this quick reply, probably the same given every day to others, over and over:

"Well, when I don't do this, I get aches and pains in the winter"


That wise old man had found out something important for his health all by himself.
He actually tested it "on his own skin"... year after year, then he drew his conclusions.
No 1988 Shanghai report, no 1999 Timo Timonen's hypothesis, and much before the "resurrection of vitamin D" (2007).


« Last Edit: 28/03/2009 15:05:35 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #217 on: 05/08/2008 14:40:13 »
Cut and paste from another thread:

Neilep, our dearest moderator, asked: "Why are colds, sore throats, colds etc so much more common in winter ?"




Easy question Neilepus amicissimus,

the answer MIGHT be right here:

http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=529704

Enjoy

ikod

AWESOME !!!..Vitamin D Rules !!...If only I knew a good source of Vitamin D !! [;)] [;)]

Hi Neilepus rapidofastissimus thread-makerus!

Cod liver oil is no good for 'boosting' your vitamin D: plenty of vitamin A and omega-3 fatty acids plus 'some' vitamin D.
It probably works in the long run as far as vitamin D3 is concerned (approx. 400 I.U./day).
So dear old 'cod' is still used daily in northern Europe, during months with the 'R': from September to April.
Short 'flashes' (30min.) of sushine between 10a.m. to 2p.m. at a proper latitude (no clouds please) really boost your  skin production of vitamin D3 (>20,000 I.U.)

Sorry you cannot read the complete paper previously cited by ikus.
You would be impressed by a 1918 study about flu reported in the article.

Shortly, in 1918, trying to find out how influenza viruses managed to infect people and to verify relative incubation times (2-3 days), proper experiments were set up using human volunteers.  Forget the details  [xx(]...but secretions from infected patients were carefully collected, mixed up and flushed through the nostrils of brave volunteers.   [:o]
Surprisingly enough, nothing happened afterwards, so the experiment was considered a 'fiasco'.


Only now, 90 years later, a crystal-clear explanation is ready for this.
Anti-infective properties of vitamin D were proved only 4-5 years ago, when the cathelicidin pathway was described.
Those volunteers were healthy men from the Navy.
Probably well-tanned all year round, perfectly healthy, they had been selected for not having had a flu in the previous months, to avoid an 'immunization' bias.
Maybe a good level of vitamin D helped them to block the influenza viruses quickly.

For the same reason, somewhere in 2005, most (maybe all) vitamin D supplemented patients in Dr J.Cannell department, Atascadero CA, went through a big influenza epidemic perfectly healthy.
John Cannell was the 'prepared mind', times were changing, so the vitamindcouncil.com crusade started.

One hypothesis out of many is that flu viruses do circulate all year round in humans, but give troubles in some people only in the cold season, i.e. when vitamin D levels are low.
So much for the anti-flu vaccination campaigns.




P.S.
The reason why Chris is not commenting on these issues is simple: he is a virology expert and knows much better than others the other side of the coin.
Everybody is waiting for final scientific proofs about vitamin D and flu, but most of all about vitamin D benefits in other dreadful diseases.
Wonderful hypotheses need extended and accurate studies to become Science.  It takes so much time.
I'm sure Chris will never have to decide from trembling hypotheses whether to give 'cod' to one of his kids or NOT.
It happened to me, after years of serious searches and rigorous evidence-based training.
That's life.

ikod





Hypothesis--ultraviolet-B irradiance and vitamin D reduce the risk of viral infections and thus their sequelae, including autoimmune diseases and some cancers.


Grant WB.
Sunlight, Nutrition, and Health Research Center, San Francisco, CA, USA. wgrant@infionline.net

Many viral infections reach clinical significance in winter, when it is cold, relative humidity is lowest and vitamin D production from solar ultraviolet-B irradiation is at its nadir. Several autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus and asthma, are linked to viral infections. Vitamin D, through induction of cathelicidin, which effectively combats both bacterial and viral infections, may reduce the risk of several autoimmune diseases and cancers by reducing the development of viral infections. Some types of cancer are also linked to viral infections. The cancers with seemingly important risk from viral infections important in winter, based on correlations with increasing latitude in the United States, an index of wintertime solar ultraviolet-B dose and vitamin D, are bladder, prostate, testicular and thyroid cancer, Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and, perhaps, gastric cancer. The evidence examined includes the role of viruses in the etiology of these diseases, the geographic and seasonal variation of these diseases, and the time of life when vitamin D is effective in reducing the risk of disease. In general, the evidence supports the hypothesis. However, further work is required to evaluate this hypothesis.

Photochem Photobiol. 2008 Mar-Apr;84(2):356-65. Epub 2008 Jan 7.




   
« Last Edit: 26/11/2008 18:29:36 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #218 on: 15/09/2008 13:27:24 »
Fifty-five years ago...


"Look, Johnnie, over there is a little spot of sunshine,
go over and play in and get your vitamin D."




http://www.uvadvantage.org/portals/0/pres/video/video/slides/slide375.jpg
« Last Edit: 02/03/2011 15:01:48 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #219 on: 15/09/2008 13:35:49 »
Good NEWS on D-vitamin!!!

Quote

M. A. Helou, G. Massey, G. Francis, K. Godder, J. Laver
 
Abstract:
Background: Survivors of childhood cancer are at increased risk for osteoporosis. Contributing factors include direct effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on bone, secondary hormone deficiencies, and chronic illness. However, vitamin D insufficiency could be a major risk factor during and after cancer therapy. Vitamin D insufficiency is common in healthy school aged children (median 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] = 28 ng/mL, 55% <30 ng/mL, 5% < 10 ng/mL.) Based on this data, we hypothesize that vitamin D insufficiency would be common among children with cancer. If vitamin D insufficiency is prevalent, correction may contribute to better bone health and immune responses in children with cancer. Methods: We determined the serum levels of 25(OH)D, PTH, calcium, and phosphorus for 40 children with leukemia or lymphoma currently on therapy (group 1), 34 children with leukemia or lymphoma off therapy (group 2), 16 children with solid tumors currently on therapy (group 3), and 10 children with solid tumors off therapy (group 4.) Prevalence of 25(OH)D insufficiency ( <32 ng/mL) and severe deficiency (<10 ng/mL) was compared by Chi square test to the healthy reference population (established by Weng, et al.)
Results: For the majority of patients, calcium and phosphorus levels were within normal limits. Conclusions: Vitamin D insufficiency was very common in all groups, especially in children with solid tumors on therapy (Group 3.) 25(OH)D levels did improve off therapy, but for Group 2, still remained significantly less than normal reference population (p=0.0001.)

The data suggests that vitamin D status should be determined for all children at diagnosis of malignancy with a strong recommendation to consider vitamin D supplementation during treatment and follow up.

J Clin Oncol 26: 2008 (May 20 suppl; abstr 10023)




Something is finally "moving" on the clinical research side...
I hope(dream) that many parents -on the other side- are giving 'cod for more than one year'!


Quote

Unfortunately, if vitamin D is needed mainly, and too much vitamin A is either toxic or counteracting "D" wonderful effects (J.Cannell et al. Nov.2008), we would need a special cod liver oil formula:


a moderate amount of vitamin A, plenty of D-vitamin and lots of omega-3!


This probably WAS the original cod liver oil, before they started removing D-vitamin, erroneously thinking that it was too close to toxic amounts.
Two thousands I.U. per day of vitamin D3 was considered almost toxic for humans.
What a shame: we seem to have destroyed the original formula.







From January 2008 VitaminD Newsletter:

Quote
...
All of the epidemiological and animal studies in the literature suggest cancer patients will prolong their lives if they take vitamin D.  I can't find any studies that indicate otherwise.  However, none of the suggestive studies are randomized controlled interventional trials; they are all epidemiological or animal studies, or, in the case of Vieth's, an open human study.  However, if you have cancer, or your child does, do you want to wait the decades it will take for the American Cancer Society to fund randomized controlled trials using the proper dose of vitamin D?  Chances are you, or your child, will not be around to see the results.
 
John Cannell, MD










« Last Edit: 16/03/2009 19:40:39 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #220 on: 20/12/2008 11:34:56 »
Closer and closer...



...
Nutrition

Only fish is naturally rich in vitamin D, so much vitamin D intake in the industrialized world is from fortified products including milk, soy milk and breakfast cereals or supplements.[1]

A blood calcidiol (25-hydroxy-vitamin D) level is the accepted way to determine vitamin D nutritional status. The optimal level of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is 35–55 ng/mL; with some debate among medical scientists for the slightly higher value. Supplementation of 100 IU (2.5 mcg) vitamin D3 raises circulating 25(OH)D by 2.5 nmol/l (1 ng/ml).[17]

The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that older adults, people with dark skin, and those exposed to insufficient ultraviolet radiation (i.e., sunlight) consume extra vitamin D from vitamin D-fortified foods and/or supplements. Individuals in these high-risk groups should consume 25 μg (1000 IU) of vitamin D daily to maintain adequate blood concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the biomarker for vitamin D status.

 
Milk and cereal grains are often fortified with vitamin D.
The Canadian Pediatric Society recommends 2,000 IU daily for pregnant and breastfeeding women.[18]

from:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_D

wiki wiki wiki wiki wiki wiki wiki wiki wiki wiki wiki!!!




« Last Edit: 10/01/2009 10:36:38 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #221 on: 05/02/2009 15:16:44 »


News, news, news...   

The Vitamin D Connection to Pediatric Infections and Immune Function.


Walker VP, Modlin RL.
Department of Pediatrics [V.P.W.], Department of Microbiology [R.L.M.], Department of Medicine [R.L.M.], David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA Los Angeles, CA 90095.

Over the past twenty years, a resurgence in vitamin D deficiency and nutritional rickets has been reported throughout the world, including the United States. Inadequate serum vitamin D concentrations have also been associated with complications from other health problems, including tuberculosis, cancer (prostate, breast and colon), multiple sclerosis and diabetes. These findings support the concept of vitamin D possessing important pleiotropic actions outside of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism.
In children, an association between nutritional rickets with respiratory compromise has long been recognized. Recent epidemiological studies clearly demonstrate the link between vitamin D deficiency and the increased incidence of respiratory infections. Further research has also elucidated the contribution of vitamin D in the host defense response to infection. However, the mechanism(s) by which vitamin D levels contribute to pediatric infections and immune function has yet to be determined. This knowledge is particularly relevant and timely, because infants and children appear more susceptible to viral rather than bacterial infections in the face of vitamin D deficiency.
The connection between vitamin D, infections and immune function in the pediatric population indicates a possible role for vitamin D supplementation in potential interventions and adjuvant therapies.

Pediatr Res. 2009 Jan 28. [Epub ahead of print]




« Last Edit: 05/02/2009 15:18:32 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #222 on: 07/03/2009 14:47:56 »
Vitamins 'could shorten lifespan'...
...may be they don't!
I'll try to read the complete report, then
I might be able to comment on this.
For now I just note that vitamin C didn't
do bad things and vitamin D is not mentioned.

ikod

...I'm not sure, really, that vitamin supplements could 'shorten' lifespan...
at least at the very beginning of life!
Canada rules.


Prenatal multivitamin supplementation and rates of pediatric cancers: a meta-analysis.


Goh YI, Bollano E, Einarson TR, Koren G.
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, and The Motherisk Program, Division of Clinical Pharmacology/Toxicology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Prenatal supplementation of folic acid has been shown to decrease the risk of several congenital malformations. Several studies have recently suggested a potential protective effect of folic acid on certain pediatric cancers. The protective role of prenatal multivitamins has not been elucidated. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the potential protective effect of prenatal multivitamins on several pediatric cancers. Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, Toxline, Healthstar, and Cochrane databases were searched for studies published in all languages from 1960 to July 2005 on multivitamin supplementation and pediatric cancers. References from all articles collected were reviewed for additional articles. Two blinded independent reviewers assessed the articles for inclusion and exclusion. Rates of cancers in women supplemented with multivitamins were compared with unsupplemented women using a random effects model. Sixty-one articles were identified in the initial search, of which, seven articles met the inclusion criteria. There was an apparent protective effect for leukemia (odds ratio (OR)=0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.50-0.74), pediatric brain tumors (OR=0.73, 95% CI=0.60-0.88) and neuroblastoma (OR=0.53, 95% CI=0.42-0.68).
In conclusion, maternal ingestion of prenatal multivitamins is associated with a decreased risk for pediatric brain tumors, neuroblastoma, and leukemia. Presently, it is not known which constituent(s) among the multivitamins confer this protective effect.

Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2007 May;81(5):685-91.






« Last Edit: 07/03/2009 14:49:52 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #223 on: 07/03/2009 14:51:08 »
...and here we go, BACK to the beginning of this endless thread!

Quote
Maternal Dietary Risk Factors in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (United States)
Jensen CD, Block G, Buffler P, Ma X, Selvin S, Month S.

...
Abstract

Objective:   Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer, and the second most common cause of mortality in children aged 1–14 years. Recent research has established that the disease can originate in utero, and thus maternal diet may be an important risk factor for ALL.

Cancer Causes Control. 2004 Aug;15(6):559-70.    http://www.springerlink.com/content/t87661x864l14368/fulltext.pdf


Is vitamin D deficiency in childhood leukemia an underestimated reality?
Could cod liver oil - the old remedy, a relic from the past - help in the
empirically arranged but clinically effective today's treatment protocols?

...
« Last Edit: 22/03/2009 08:23:52 by iko »

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #224 on: 28/03/2009 15:06:46 »


Thank you Zoey,
for asking about my favourite quote.  Well, to explain it properly, in a short 'essay' in english... it will take me more than a few minutes!  But translating it is the easiest thing:

"The sun gives life, the sun takes it back"


These words concluded one of the best lectures I attended in my life. At the 3rd year of Medical school, General Pathology course, more than thirty years ago. Professor Mario Umberto Dianzani was our teacher, Dean of the Medical Faculty and a distinguished scientist, totally dedicated to his students.  Later on he has been Rector of the University of Turin for several years before retiring.
In those days biochemistry was 'the' thing: new cofactors and vitamins were deeply explored by medical research.
I'm sure I owe to his excellent lectures my following research interest in cofactors.


"Aging of cells and living organisms" was the subject of the lecture.

In less than one hour we went from the origin of life on our Planet to the present time.
Volcanoes and oceans plus UV light to catalyze the synthesis of organic compounds (Miller's experiment), then nucleic acid formation after million years of random combinations.
Primitive organisms, bacteria and algae.  Again the sunlight creates energy through photosynthetic processes and here come trees and forests! Different species of primitive life, unicellular, multicellular towards more and more complex organisms, thanks to spontaneous mutations, natural selection and evolution. For the whole 'biosphere' survival is always tightly bound to its origin, to the sunlight.
Sunlight and ultraviolet rays give energy and feed the whole system, nevertheless they are responsible -in the end- for lipid peroxidation and DNA damage.  A series of biochemical reactions lead to senescence in multicellular organisms too.
Complex systems are progressively deranged: skin, bones, muscles, nerves, glands and immune cells get older...diseases follow.
The sun itself puts an end to our lives.

Magic

... 




"Il sole dona la vita, il sole se la riprende"
Mario Umberto Dianzani, 1975.





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Offline Karen W.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #225 on: 29/03/2009 02:04:20 »
I got two hours of that beautiful sunshine today and it makes me feel so much better!!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #226 on: 08/12/2009 15:06:41 »
Long time, no see... [;)]
No discussion anymore, >70k viewers in over 3 years, ≈100 a day.

Is vitamin D3 good for the bone(marrow)?

Vitamin D Metabolism and Action in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells.


Zhou S, Leboff MS, Glowacki J.

Departments of Orthopedic Surgery (S.Z., J.G.) and Medicine (M.S.L.), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.

Vitamin D metabolites are important effectors of bone and mineral homeostasis. Extrarenal conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) to the biologically active form of vitamin D, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] is catalyzed in several cell types by the 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), but little is known about the expression or regulation of CYP27B1 in human bones. We examined whether human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs, also known as mesenchymal stem cells) participate in vitamin D metabolism and whether vitamin D hydroxylases in hMSCs are influenced by the vitamin D status of the individual from whom the hMSCs were obtained. We also investigated the effects of vitamin D metabolites on osteoblast differentiation and the role of IGF-I in the regulation of CYP27B1. In a series of 27 subjects, vitamin D hydroxylases in hMSCs were expressed at different levels and were correlated with serum 25OHD, 1,25(OH)2D, and PTH. In vitro treatment with 25OHD up-regulated CYP27B1 and IGF-I in hMSCs; IGF-I also up-regulated CY27B1 expression and stimulated osteoblast differentiation. When hydroxylation of 25OHD was blocked by ketoconazole, a cytochrome P450 inhibitor, 25OHD was no longer able to induce CYP27B1 expression.

 In summary, these findings show that human bone marrow stromal cells have the molecular machinery both to metabolize and respond to vitamin D. We propose that circulating 25OHD, by virtue of its local conversion to 1,25(OH)2D catalyzed by basal CYP27B1 in hMSCs, amplifies vitamin D signaling through IGF-I up-regulation, which in turn induces CYP27B1 in a feed-forward mechanism to potentiate osteoblast differentiation initiated by IGF-I.

Endocrinology. 2009 Dec 4. [Epub ahead of print]


« Last Edit: 09/12/2009 21:57:05 by iko »

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #227 on: 12/12/2009 10:04:24 »
 Iko what is osteoblast differentiation?

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline Chemistry4me

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #228 on: 13/12/2009 05:05:04 »
An osteoblast is a cell from which bone develops, differentiation here means to specialise and form different types of cells with different functions, for example, some specialise to become the periosteum on the outside of the bone and others the marrow on the inside.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #229 on: 14/12/2009 14:37:53 »
Thank you Chem4me,

...I have been looking for some pic&link to post for Karen:




...and here is the text:  http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/life-science/stem-cell-biology/mesenchymal-stem-cells.html

Bone marrow is a complex 'system', and to fix its defects and failures even more difficult sometime!
I'll look for other nice pictures and links in a while.

ikod

...Location of active bone marrow in an adult:


« Last Edit: 14/12/2009 16:35:15 by iko »

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #230 on: 19/02/2010 16:05:02 »
Say someone is diagnosed as being severely deficient in vitamin D. Would that person Possibly be suffering, extreme exhaustion, weakness in the legs, arms etc. Maybe general feelings of un-wellness, or perhaps heaviness of limbs, degenerating bones, fractures,and unusual wear and tear on bones? Maybe even aches in the joints and such problems..etc? Perhaps short stabbing pains in toes and bottom of feet and legs also? Could a deficiency of"D" cause any of these symptoms...?
What concerns should one have when having severe deficiencies of "D".

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #231 on: 19/02/2010 22:00:24 »
Say someone is diagnosed as being severely deficient in vitamin D. Would that person Possibly be suffering, extreme exhaustion, weakness in the legs, arms etc. Maybe general feelings of un-wellness, or perhaps heaviness of limbs, degenerating bones, fractures,and unusual wear and tear on bones? Maybe even aches in the joints and such problems..etc? Perhaps short stabbing pains in toes and bottom of feet and legs also? Could a deficiency of"D" cause any of these symptoms...?
What concerns should one have when having severe deficiencies of "D".

Hi Karen,

Today vitamin D deficiency is diagnosed by testing 25OHvitamin D levels in a blood sample.
Levels <20 ng/mL are defined as 'vitamin D deficiency'. Symptoms may be totally absent or many and severe. We are all different, with different capabilities to cope with a temporary condition of deficiency (lack of sun exposure during winter months).
Treatment is easy: 50,000 I.U vitamin D3 per week, orally for 6 weeks (300,000 I.U total), then 50,000 I.U. per month. Blood levels may be rechecked after 6-12 months.
Half-life of vitamin D should be around 90 days.
Improvement in symptoms of deficiency (bone pain, weakness etc.) may be expected not before 10-15days.  See Professor Michael Holick's videos for details! ...and for the fun of it: he is treating zoo's patients...waiting for his turn in the Nobel Prize race!





What my mind is made up about is the assertion that "vitamins can do magic" is crap.

Vitamin D is unique amongst vitamins because it's a pre-hormone and is part of the endocrine system.  Genetic research from the last 10-20 years has revealed that vitamin D (as calcitriol) regulates many important functions throughout the body, including immunity, inflammation and cell propagation.  These functions are linked to a number of morbidities.

Ecological studies link latitude and skin colour to 'vitamin D' morbidities; cohort studies link low vitamin D levels with 'vitamin D' morbidities; epidemiological studies show high levels of vitamin D deficiency by latitude and by skin colour; the few RCTs involving large dose supplementation show that vitamin D significantly reduces 'vitamin D' morbidities.

Not "vitamins", just vitamin D; not magic, just science.


You are exactly right Kevan,

but we have to tell the whole story:
why such a simple and cheap remedy is coming so late in modern medicine?
I can give you some good reasons to 'justify' such a delay:
- Vitamin D is not a vitamin, but a steroid hormone acting on specific cell receptors.
- The dosage in serum is tricky and expensive: large studies are coming out only now.
- Normal levels are expressed in ng/mL or nmol/ml, just for the fun of it...
- The active form, calcitriol, has been improperly used instead of replenishing 25-OHvitD pool.
- Toxicity has been overestimated: 400U/day failed where 2000U/day are making the trick.
- Cholecalciferol or vitamin D3 is a 'generic' drug, too cheap to support clinical trials.

Do you want to play the doctor?
Just read this amazing case report, free-fulltext from Canada:



Now look for a chronic-back-pain patient, get a history of lack of sunlight exposure, no cod liver oil or vitamin D supplements and suggest her/him to have 25-OHvitaminD tested.
If the result is below 20 ng/ml...Bingo!  Send her/him to a doctor for a 50kU/week x 8weeks prescription.  A clinician will exclude any condition of vitD toxicity or intolerance and monitor calcium levels if necessary.
The following two-three weeks might be really magic for that patient...
Unbelievable? On my part, I don't think so anymore!  [;)]



Improvement of chronic back pain or failed back surgery with vitamin D repletion: a case series.

Schwalfenberg G.

Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Canada. gschwalf@telus.net

This article reviews 6 selected cases of improvement/resolution of chronic back pain or failed back surgery after vitamin D repletion in a Canadian family practice setting. Pub Med was searched for articles on chronic back pain, failed back surgery, and vitamin D deficiency. Chronic low back pain and failed back surgery may improve with repletion of vitamin D from a state of deficiency/insufficiency to sufficiency. Vitamin D insufficiency is common; repletion of vitamin D to normal levels in patients who have chronic low back pain or have had failed back surgery may improve quality of life or, in some cases, result in complete resolution of symptoms.

J Am Board Fam Med.2009 Jan-Feb;22(1):69-74.

« Last Edit: 19/02/2010 22:40:59 by iko »

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #232 on: 20/02/2010 02:17:00 »
ok Iko.. My blood tests=vitamin "D" test came back at 12 WHICH she said was very very low.. supplements have been added 1 a week at 1.25mg for a 12 weeks. Only she said it shouldn't be that low while I am taking huge doses of omega 3, Vitamin "D," and my thyroid screwed up, so I am  now taking 175mcg levoxyl instead 150.Feel like crap and hurt everywhere especially in my bones etc...
« Last Edit: 06/06/2010 07:19:20 by Karen W. »

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #233 on: 20/02/2010 11:50:54 »
ok Iko.. My tests vitamin "D" test came back at 12 and she said it was very very low.. supplements have been added 1 a week at 1.25mg for a 12 weeks. Only she said it shouldn't be that low while I am taking huge doses of omega 3 Vitamin. "D" and my thyroid screwed up now taking 175mcg levoxyl instead 150.Feel like crap and hurt everywhere specially in my bones etc...


1 a week at 1.25mg...

...of WHAT? D2, D3, Dx?
Ergocalciferol, Cholecalciferol, Calcitriol, Whateverol?  [;)]

1.25mg per week of D2(ergocalciferol) or D3(cholecalciferol) are 50,000 I.U.(International Units).
Just fine for a good replenishing of the sunshine hormone avoiding toxicity.
Improvement expected in 10-15 days: sometimes referred as magic, all of a sudden.
Fingers crossed.

How low were your very very low low values...in digits?



20-30min. of proper sunlight exposure,
the so called "suberythemal dose"
should give us 10-20,000 I.U. of Vit.D!!!


I got two hours of that beautiful sunshine today and it makes me feel so much better!!


« Last Edit: 20/02/2010 12:11:13 by iko »

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #234 on: 20/02/2010 14:18:57 »
in digits....12

She said she wants to get me back up to around 50 or 60 can't recall which one.
« Last Edit: 20/02/2010 14:38:43 by Karen W. »

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #235 on: 20/02/2010 14:29:05 »
The bottle says: TAKE ONE CAPSULE WEEKLY
                 
                 VITAMIN D 1.25MG
                 
                 GREEN OVAL PA140

THEY ARE GREEN OVAL LIQUID FILLED CAPSULES.

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #236 on: 20/02/2010 15:02:03 »
Yap! Got it!


It is vitamin D2(ergocalciferol)...It seems that you don't have D3 in the States, poor things  [:D].
But you have prof. Michael Holick!
It is the right stuff and the proper dosage.
See you in 10days (after the second pill!).
Wish you all the best,

ikod

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #237 on: 20/02/2010 15:04:27 »

in digits....12
 

...I'm so sorry! and ignorant: I thought 'back at 12' was the TIME!!!  [;D]

You seem to be in the right range to benefit from this type of treatment.
Today values <20 nanograms/milliliter are considered as vitamin D deficiency.
In the few patients I heard of, from relatives and friends (I don't practice):
a 6ng/mL, over 80yrs was in very bad shape and got better quickly,
a 9ng/mL, around 70yrs had chronic back pain and  bony aches(mostly hips): fine after 10days.
a 17ng/mL, 60yrs with back pains in the morning got better in weeks.
It's called osteomalacia from vitamin D deficiency...and it has been neglected for long.
Vitamin D dosages started to be commonly available only in the '90s.
For fear of toxicity, vitamin supplements usually have 200 I.U. only (1400 per week!).
I hope this is your case and you'll find other 'deficient' patients in your neighbourhood to tell your happy end...in just two weeks!

« Last Edit: 22/02/2010 14:32:12 by iko »

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #238 on: 21/02/2010 02:34:36 »
Thank you IKO I
Yap! Got it!


It is vitamin D2(ergocalciferol)...It seems that you don't have D3 in the States, poor things  [:D].
But you have prof. Michael Holick!
It is the right stuff and the proper dosage.
See you in 10days (after the second pill!).
Wish you all the best,

ikod
LOL...LOL..I sure hope it works well. Will be good to feel better!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #239 on: 21/02/2010 02:46:04 »
Thanks IKO..
Yap! Got it!


It is vitamin D2(ergocalciferol)...It seems that you don't have D3 in the States, poor things  [:D].
But you have prof. Michael Holick!
It is the right stuff and the proper dosage.
See you in 10days (after the second pill!).
Wish you all the best,

ikod
Ten days from thursday day before yesterday! YAYYYYYYYYY!!!!

"Life is not measured by the number of Breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #240 on: 21/02/2010 13:27:02 »
ok Iko.. My blood tests=vitamin "D" test came back at 12 WHICH she said was very very low.. supplements have been added 1 a week at 1.25mg for a 12 weeks. Only she said it shouldn't be that low while I am taking huge doses of omega 3 Vitamin. "D" and my thyroid screwed up now taking 175mcg levoxyl instead 150.Feel like crap and hurt everywhere specially in my bones etc...


Instead of tons of omega-3(fish oil), you could have taken
Liver fish oil, rich of omega-3 plus vitamin A and D.  [;)]
« Last Edit: 21/02/2010 13:30:24 by iko »

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #241 on: 21/02/2010 15:07:23 »
WELL THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN GOOD lol... WHAT THE HECK IS A LIVER FISH? LOL...

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #242 on: 21/02/2010 16:12:59 »
WELL THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN GOOD lol... WHAT THE HECK IS A LIVER FISH? LOL...

Fish liver oil...mostly cod liver oil!!!  [;D]
(I learned English from a book!)
Hugs

ikod

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #243 on: 21/02/2010 19:40:49 »
LOL...LOL. Basically cod liver oil.... OK then.. Thanks Iko.. Your English is fine like mine... Sometimes, I need to explain myself, too!

Thank you!

Hugs you back!

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #244 on: 06/06/2010 07:31:27 »
update...I am now in my second round of 12 weeks of Vitamin D supplementation. I do feel some better but still having some problems.. She checked my Vitamin d level and felt it necessary to   continue for another 12 weeks on 50,000 units a week. 

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Offline ericcarter13

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #245 on: 18/06/2010 14:37:05 »
"There is much we still need to learn about the roles of diet and physical activity in protecting against cancer: We are confident these new studies will add to our understanding in this vital field,"
newbielink:http://www.r4-ds-card.com/ [nonactive]

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #246 on: 18/06/2010 17:54:34 »
Do we need more than vitamin D 200-400 I.U. per day recommended in the past century?
Maybe:

Are commonly recommended dosages for vitamin D supplementation too low?
Vitamin D status and effects of supplementation on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels
-an observational study during clinical practice conditions.


Leidig-Bruckner G, Roth HJ, Bruckner T, Lorenz A, Raue F, Frank-Raue K.
Gemeinschaftspraxis für Endokrinologie, Nuklearmedizin und Humangenetik, Brückenstr. 21, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany, thomas.bruckner@t-online.de.

Abstract
Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased fracture risk. The observational study aimed to investigate vitamin D status and supplementation in ambulatory patients. Only 20% of patients had optimal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels. Commonly recommended dosages were insufficient to achieve clinically relevant increase of 25(OH)D levels. Higher dosages were safe and effective under clinical practice conditions.
INTRODUCTION: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with adverse health outcome. The study aimed to investigate vitamin D status and supplementation in ambulatory patients.
METHODS: Nine hundred seventy-five women and 188 men were evaluated for bone status from January 2008 to August 2008 within an observational study; 104 patients (n = 70 osteoporosis) received follow-up after 3 months. Dosage of vitamin D supplementation was documented and serum 25(OH)D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) determined.
RESULTS: In all patients (age, 60.4 +/- 14.1 years), distribution of 25(OH)D was 56.3 +/- 22.3 nmol/L (normal range, 52-182 nmol/L) and PTH 53.8 +/- 67.5 ng/L (normal range, 11-43 ng/L). The proportion of patients with 25(OH)D < 25, 25 to <50, 50 to <75, >/=75 nmol/L was 7.5%, 33.3%, 38.9% and 20.2% in the total group and 20.1%, 38.5%, 30.8%, 10.6% at baseline in the follow-up group, respectively. After 3 months, 3.9% had still 25(OH)D < 25 nmol/L; only 12.5% achieved 25(OH)D >/= 75 nmol/L. In osteoporosis patients, 25(OH)D increased more in those taking >/=1,500 (median, 3,000) IU vitamin D per day (33.1 +/- 14.7 nmol/L) compared with </=1,000 (median, 800) IU/day (10.6 +/- 20.0 nmol/L) (p < 0.0008). PTH decreased more in patients taking >/=1,500 IU/day (-13.2 +/- 15.2 ng/L) compared with </=1,000 IU/day (-7.6 +/- 19.2 ng/L; p = 0.29). 25(OH)D was negatively correlated to PTH (r = -0.49, p < 0.0001). An increase of 25(OH)D >/= 75 nmol/L resulted in normalised PTH.

CONCLUSION: Supplementation with higher vitamin D dosages (2,000-3,000 IU/day) is required to achieve a relevant increase of 25(OH)D and normalisation of PTH.

Osteoporos Int. 2010 Jun 17. [Epub ahead of print]






A promise is a promise... [;)]
so here you find D-vitamin safety limits:

Risk assessment for vitamin D.


Hathcock JN, Shao A, Vieth R, Heaney R.
Council for Responsible Nutrition, Washington, DC 20036-5114, USA. jhathcock@crnusa.org

The objective of this review was to apply the risk assessment methodology used by the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) to derive a revised safe Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for vitamin D. New data continue to emerge regarding the health benefits of vitamin D beyond its role in bone. The intakes associated with those benefits suggest a need for levels of supplementation, food fortification, or both that are higher than current levels. A prevailing concern exists, however, regarding the potential for toxicity related to excessive vitamin D intakes. The UL established by the FNB for vitamin D (50 microg, or 2000 IU) is not based on current evidence and is viewed by many as being too restrictive, thus curtailing research, commercial development, and optimization of nutritional policy. Human clinical trial data published subsequent to the establishment of the FNB vitamin D UL published in 1997 support a significantly higher UL. We present a risk assessment based on relevant, well-designed human clinical trials of vitamin D.
Collectively, the absence of toxicity in trials conducted in healthy adults that used vitamin D dose > or = 250 microg/d (10,000 IU vitamin D3) supports the confident selection of this value as the UL.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jan;85(1):6-18.




Free full text to enjoy real Science!  http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/reprint/85/1/6
« Last Edit: 24/06/2010 14:11:04 by iko »

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Offline Jimy blue

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #247 on: 18/06/2010 18:55:57 »
he doctor should be called if the parent notices that the child has any signs of vitamin D
take care people

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Offline Karen W.

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #248 on: 19/06/2010 12:13:42 »
Jimmy Blue do you mean if the child has any sign of vitamin "D" deficiency?

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Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #249 on: 24/06/2010 10:20:19 »

D-vitamin newsletter!  [;D] [;D] [;D]



Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections in healthy adults.

Sabetta JR, Depetrillo P, Cipriani RJ, Smardin J, Burns LA, Landry ML.

Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Declining serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D seen in the fall and winter as distance increases from the equator may be a factor in the seasonal increased prevalence of influenza and other viral infections. This study was done to determine if serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations correlated with the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: In this prospective cohort study serial monthly concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured over the fall and winter 2009-2010 in 198 healthy adults, blinded to the nature of the substance being measured. The participants were evaluated for the development of any acute respiratory tract infections by investigators blinded to the 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations. The incidence of infection in participants with different concentrations of vitamin D was determined. One hundred ninety-five (98.5%) of the enrolled participants completed the study. Light skin pigmentation, lean body mass, and supplementation with vitamin D were found to correlate with higher concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Concentrations of 38 ng/ml or more were associated with a significant (p<0.0001) two-fold reduction in the risk of developing acute respiratory tract infections and with a marked reduction in the percentages of days ill.
CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Maintenance of a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentration of 38 ng/ml or higher should significantly reduce the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections and the burden of illness caused thereby, at least during the fall and winter in temperate zones. The findings of the present study provide direction for and call for future interventional studies examining the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in reducing the incidence and severity of specific viral infections, including influenza, in the general population and in subpopulations with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, such as pregnant women, dark skinned individuals, and the obese.

PLoS One. 2010 Jun 14;5(6):e11088